Blogs for “the other BSDs”: NetBSD, OpenBSD and DragonFlyBSD

This blog, FreeBSD – the unknown Giant, as the title suggests, covers only FreeBSD related stories and updates. However, over the last few months, I have received emails from my some readers asking why I don’t write about the “other BSDs”, such as OpenBSD, NetBSD and DragonflyBSD.

Well, the answer is quite simple: “There’s no need to!” No, not because they’re not worth writing about, they certainly are, but because there are already some quality blogs dedicated to each of these BSD operating systems.  Hence my reason for not, or only occasionally, writing about then. Since these blogs are regularly updated with news, howtos and information on made progress, I’ve decided not to just copy, paste and republish what’s on those blogs.

To find out more about OpenBSD, visit the OpenBSD Journal. The DragonflyBSD digest is updated regularly with news relating to DragonflyBSD, and lately a lot on the progress of the newly created and much promising Hammer File System (HammerFS), whilst Hubert’s NetBSD blog brings the latest and greatest with regards to NetBSD.

Of course there are more many blogs and websites tracking the “big four”, but these are the best as far as I’m aware.

4 thoughts on “Blogs for “the other BSDs”: NetBSD, OpenBSD and DragonFlyBSD

  1. Oliver Herold says:

    >Of course there are more many blogs and websites tracking the “big four”, but these are the best as far as I’m aware.

    I used to be rather vocal on my weblog in terms of BSD for some years, but in the end I don’t care anymore. There is no place for BSD on the desktop and BSD is dying, slowly but constantly. There is need for news in the mainstream-media, people don’t care about weblogs, homepages etc. with special interests in some dark corner of the internet. But the mainstream-media doesn’t care about BSD anymore. Some major release is sometimes maybe worth two or three lines, this was completely different in den 90s. Yeah “bad bad Linux, it’s stealing all of the news”, quiet frankly it’s a selfmade problem, there is almost no interest in BSD-community to be somewhat vocal in the public. It’s a pity to see the steady decline of BSD and at the same time the propaganda of some single people who are telling the opposite. It’s a ‘fight’ against wind-mills.

  2. Gerard says:

    I’m not sure if promoting BSD is a lost cause!

    More and more people are becoming aware that there are more operating systems in the world apart from Microsoft Windows.

    Admitted, Linux is gaining ground. Ubuntu is a reasonably user-friendly computer and getting better with every release, but that doesn’t mean that PC-BSD and DesktopBSD aren’t good contenders. If people haven’t heard of them, they won’t use it -> hence we all need to do more about promoting BSD, online and offline.

    There is a growing number of advanced Linux users using/trying FreeBSD because of how it’s structured and how the Project is managed by the Core Team.

    Although more BSD marketing is always desirable, the FreeBSD marketing team, iXsystems and Dru Lavigne for instance are doing a great job at recommending, demystifying and promoting BSD where they can.

    bsdstats.org statistics are showing that more people and more people are using BSD, esp. PC-BSD and DesktopBSD.

    What we need is open drivers and open hardware specifications or at leaset (closed) BSD drivers.

  3. Oliver Herold says:

    >I’m not sure if promoting BSD is a lost cause!

    I’m not saying it’s a lost cause per se, but it is a lost cause if the majority of users are ignorant about that matter.

    >bsdstats.org statistics are showing that more people and more people are using BSD, esp. PC-BSD and DesktopBSD.

    You know, these numbers are crap. Ask some people on the mailinglists, people using FreeBSD since a decade, the system to obtain those numbers is more than bogus.

    >There is a growing number of advanced Linux users using/trying FreeBSD because of how it’s structured and how the Project is managed by the Core Team.

    Gerard, that’s the propaganda for the masses, I told people the same things for some years and we see a steady decline since the 90s. There is _no_ momentum.

    >but that doesn’t mean that PC-BSD and DesktopBSD aren’t good contenders.

    I was a vocal member of the DesktopBSD-team for some years. I do know the ‘community’, I do know Linux since the early 90s, I do know commercial Unices like Irix and so on. To make it short, I’m realistic. Where is Flash for example? People don’t care about solutions like Wine+Firefox or some bogus solution with an unstable Linuxolator plus Flash 7. Flash is a so-called killer-application nowadays. Where is the easy installation for the desktop? Even PC-BSD is lightyears away compared to _every_ tiny Linux-distro out there. People don’t care about ‘why’, people want to see something, they want to use something!

    >What we need is open drivers and open hardware specifications or at leaset (closed) BSD drivers.

    What we need are developers, there are enough specifications and free drivers out there. What we need are developers who are able to use this knowledge. What we really need are developers who aren’t afraid of the desktop!!

  4. Matt Olander says:

    From a server manufacturing and integration perspective, I can definitely attest to the fact that BSD usage (FreeBSD in particular, since that is our forte) is on the rise. iXsystems has been in the same Production facility since the early 90s and we are currently shipping more servers with FreeBSD installed than at any other time during company history.

    As a volunteer that has been attending many major industry tradeshows and conferences on behalf of FreeBSD for years, I’ve noticed that more attendees are familiar with FreeBSD than there were in the past, at the same shows.

    From the PC-BSD side, we’ve now had reports from several schools that have switched entire infrastructures over to FreeBSD and PC-BSD. In addition, iXsystems has been responding to more FreeBSD and PC-BSD support contract requests than ever before.

    There is also now a BSD Magazine that seems to be off to a very good start!

    best,
    -Matt

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