Google web browser: Chrome

On 1 September Google introduced its new web browser, Chrome, with a comic book.

Yesterday when Chrome became available I installed it and have been using it happily for a few hours. It’s light weight, fast and stable. As can be expected from Google the browser is simple and has a clean and intuitive user interface.

Today, Google launched a new web browser called Google Chrome. At the same time, we are releasing all of the code as open source under a permissive BSD license. The open source project is called Chromium – after the metal used to make chrome. Today, Google launched a new web browser called Google Chrome. At the same time, we are releasing all of the code as open source under a permissive BSD license. The open source project is called Chromium – after the metal used to make chrome.  Source

I know it’s only a beta version yet, but I was missing my favourite (Firefox) extensions and a “subscribe to RSS button”. Hopefully this will be added before the final version comes out.

Did you know that Microsoft had a multimedia browser project code-named Chrome back in 1998?Ironical or what?

Is the launch of Chrome the beginning of another browser war? We don’t know yet, but competition is always good. Do you remember the anti-trust cases against Microsoft for bundling Internet Explorer to Windows? Microsoft is now planning to sue Google because of Chrome claiming that Google is a monopoly, according to the Inquirer.

You may wonder why I post this on my BSD focused blog. Well, in the first place because Chrome is an open source project released under the permissive BSD license, and secondly I’m just excited about it. Google will be releasing a Linux and MAC version soon. Maybe this can be ported to FreeBSD too…?

3 thoughts on “Google web browser: Chrome

  1. Oliver Herold says:

    It’s not real open source: http://www.google.com/chrome/eula.html

    “10.2 You may not (and you may not permit anyone else to) copy, modify, create a derivative work of, reverse engineer, decompile or otherwise attempt to extract the source code of the Software or any part thereof, unless this is expressly permitted or required by law, or unless you have been specifically told that you may do so by Google, in writing.”

    You can get only Chromium: http://code.google.com/p/chromium/ but you cannot get Chrome! So no browser for any system Google doesn’t like to support.

  2. Gerard says:

    Thanks for clearing that up, Oliver. Whatever the license, I like the browser; it’s free and it does well what it needs to do.

    Just for anywone interested, a closed code program that I can recommend is IBM Lotus Symphony: it’s faster than OpenOffice and menus are more intuitive.

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