Minimizing downtime using NanoBSD, ZFS and jails

With more and more services and applications running on your average server, upgrading the operating system and application software becomes trickier and larger service windows are needed performing these upgrades.

Over the last four years Paul Schenkeveld (PSconsult) has searched for means and methods to keep software up to date with minimum downtime and inconvenience for users and maximum consistency. The result is a model which combines the strength of NanoBSD, ZFS and jails to build servers where application upgrades result in downtime of only a few seconds and kernel upgrades only need the time to reboot without installing in (tampering with) the running system. This system is in production now for several months on 6 to 8 servers at four different sites.

LWN.net has an article explaining Paul’s approach:

On May 6, NLUUG held its Spring Conference with the theme System Administration. There were a lot of talks about very specific tools or case studies, but one struck your author because it married conceptual simplicity with a useful goal: Minimizing service windows on servers using NanoBSD + ZFS + jails by Paul Schenkeveld. Over the last four years, Paul has searched for methods to upgrade applications on a server with minimal downtime. The system he implemented is in production now on various servers, which require only a few seconds downtime for an application upgrade and the same amount of time for a rollback if the upgrade fails.

[...]

Combining these three technologies (NanoBSD, ZFS, and jails), Paul reached his goal of setting up a FreeBSD server that can be upgraded with minimal downtime. All user-visible applications run in jails. Underneath the jails, a minimal FreeBSD operating system runs, built using the NanoBSD script. This holds the kernel, some low-level services, and the tools for building a new system image for upgrading the operating system. The NanoBSD system image can be put on a partition of a regular disk drive, but Paul prefers to put it on a separate flash drive, because NanoBSD is specifically designed for it and using a separate drive for the operating system makes it easier for the system administrator when the hard drives with the jails fail.

Read the whole article:
NLUUG: Minimizing downtime on servers using NanoBSD, ZFS, and jails

Paul presented the above also in Tokio at AsiaBSDCon 2010:


One thought on “Minimizing downtime using NanoBSD, ZFS and jails

  1. Pingback: nanoBSD for servers – Part 1

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