FreeBSD 9 Review by on the Linux Action Show (video)

Alan, Chris and Bryan talk about FreeBSD 9.0 on the Linux Action Show.

In my opinion, the hosts could be more focused, serious and professional, instead of joking around continually. Anyway, this is the link: FreeBSD 9.0 Review.

If you’re interested in the FreeBSD part, jump to 37:55.

Topics of the conversation:

  • UFS Softupdate Journaling
  • The FreeBSD Fast File System now supports softupdates journaling. It introduces a intent log into a softupdates-enabled file system which eliminates the need for background fsck(8) even on unclean shutdown
  • This new feature means that a fsck after an unexpected reboot is no longer required. In modern FreeBSD only a basic preen was required, and then a full fsck would take place on a snapshot of the file system, in the background after the system had finished rebooting. With the new softupdate journaling (basically an intent log), a full fsck is no longer required at all
  • Journaling support is enabled by default on all newly created file systems, and can be enabled on existing UFS2 partitions using tunefs(8)
  • Full TRIM support for SSDs
  • The FreeBSD Fast File System now supports the TRIM command when freeing data blocks. The TRIM-enable flag makes the file system send a delete request to the underlying device for each freed block
  • TRIM support can also be enabled during newfs(8) or on an existing file system with tunefs(8)
  • ZFS Upgraded to v28
  • ZFS v28 introduces support for data deduplication, triple parity RAIDZ (raidz3), snapshot holds, log device removal, zfs diff, zpool split, zpool import -F, and read-only zpool import
  • The zpool(8): utility now supports a zpool labelclear command. This allows to wipe the label data from a drive that is not active in a pool
  • HAST Improvements
  • The Highly Available Storage daemon now supports data checksumming (crc32 or sha256) and compression (zero hole or lzf) and improved security
  • Introduction of the GEOM RAID class graid(8)
  • Which supports:
    • RAID0
    • RAID1
    • RAID1E
    • RAID10
    • SINGLE
    • CONCAT
  • It also supports the on disk formats for:
    • Intel RAID BIOS
    • JMicron RAID BIOS
    • NVIDIA MediaShield RAID BIOS
    • Promise and AMD/ATI RAID BIOS
    • SiliconImage RAID BIOS
  • Additionally, geom_map(4) allows specific areas of a device to be mapped as separate devices, especially useful for embedded flash storage
  • GEOM also support the following classes: CACHE, ELI, JOURNAL, LABEL, MIRROR, MOUNTVER, MULTIPATH, NOP, PART, RAID3, SCHED, SHSEC, STRIPE and VIRSTOR
  • NFSv4 with ACLs
  • In addition to NFSv2 and v3,
  • New utmpx(3) user accounting system
  • 5 new TCP congestion control schems
  • The FreeBSD TCP/IP network stack now supports the mod_cc(9) pluggable congestion control framework. This allows TCP congestion control algorithms to be implemented as dynamically loadable kernel modules
  • The following kernel modules are available as of 9.0-RELEASE: cc_chd(4) for the CAIA-Hamilton-Delay algorithm, cc_cubic(4) for the CUBIC algorithm, cc_hd(4) for the Hamilton-Delay algorithm, cc_htcp(4) for the H-TCP algorithm, cc_newreno(4) for the NewReno algorithm, and cc_vegas(4) for the Vegas algorithm.
  • An h_ertt(4) (Enhanced Round Trip Time) module has been added, which allows per-connection, low noise estimates of the instantaneous RTT in the TCP/IP network stack.
  • New CAM based disk subsystem
  • The ATA/SATA disk subsystem has been replaced with a new cam(4)-based implementation. cam(4) stands for Common Access Method, which is an implementation of an API set originally for SCSI–2 and standardized as “SCSI–2 Common Access Method Transport and SCSI Interface Module”
  • The ada(4) driver now supports per-device write cache control. New sysctl(8) variables kern.cam.ada.write_cache and kern.cam.ada.N.write_cache settings of 1 enables and 0 disables the write cache, and –1 leaves the device default behavior. sysctl(8) variables can override the configuration in a per-device basis (the default value is –1, which means to use the global setting)
  • New Resource Accounting and Limiting APIs
  • RACCT is a new resource accounting API has been implemented. It can keep per-process, per-jail, and per-loginclass resource accounting information
  • The new resource-limiting API RCTL works in conjunction with the RACCT resource accounting implementation and takes user-configurable actions based on the set of rules it maintains and the current resource usage
  • Full USB3 support
  • OpenSSH upgraded to 5.8p2 with HPN for faster transfer speeds
  • OpenResolv to manage resolv.conf for multiple interfaces
  • Support for SHA–256 and SHA–512 cryptographic password hashing
  • sh updated
  • new arithmetic expression handling imported from dash (which is originally from NetBSD ash)
  • changes to the way builtin commands relate to PATH env
  • fixed various other bugs
  • Capsicum Capability Mode
  • New Sandboxing and compartmentalization framework from Cambridge University
  • Improved privilege separation in OpenSSH and DHClient
  • Replacement of various GPL tools and utilities with BSD licensed ones to avoid GPLv3
  • libreadline
  • grep
  • llvm/clang imported, will eventually replace gcc 4.2 (last GPL v2)
  • compiler-rt replaced libgcc

FreeBSD 9.0 Review

Thanks to David Rogers for making me aware of this review. Submit your news.

 

One thought on “FreeBSD 9 Review by on the Linux Action Show (video)

  1. Sha'ul ben Avraham Yitzhak says:

    Thank you for putting that video link up, it was more entertaining than it was informative. I understand what you mean about the constant playing, I actually have no respect at all for the one host Bryan, he put up a YouTube video a few years ago taking about how old the OpenBSD installer feels 1990′s and said it needs to be updated with a nice GUI. Basically trying to find a nice way to be very condescending and maybe a little patronizing of OpenBSD. I think he essentially does not take BSD seriously because it can’t fit into his ideology. For me OpenBSD is my first love, so that’s why it would bother me so much.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>