BSD Magazine – Issue 2 – September 2008

The second issue of the BSD Magazine (September 2008) is out now.

More than 60 pages full of news, great articles, tutorials, how-tos and extras. This is the table of contents:

06 BSD News
08 DVD contents description
10 OpenBSD 4.3 installation & configuration
18 You have installed it? Now what? Packages!!
22 OpenBSD
26 BSD Certification
30 Building an OpenBSD SAMP server with content filtering proxy
38 OpenBSD as an Desktop
40 Inside the PBI system
44 Connecting to other IM networks
50 Kernel File system – development in userspace
54 Securing IM using Jabber/XMPPP and LTS
58 OpenBSD and making money
61 Absolute FreeBSD 2nd edition
62 PC-BSD in schools
64 Interview with OpenBSD developer Damien Bergamini

For more information and subscriptions visit the BSD Magazine website.

Blogs for “the other BSDs”: NetBSD, OpenBSD and DragonFlyBSD

This blog, FreeBSD – the unknown Giant, as the title suggests, covers only FreeBSD related stories and updates. However, over the last few months, I have received emails from my some readers asking why I don’t write about the “other BSDs”, such as OpenBSD, NetBSD and DragonflyBSD.

Well, the answer is quite simple: “There’s no need to!” No, not because they’re not worth writing about, they certainly are, but because there are already some quality blogs dedicated to each of these BSD operating systems.¬† Hence my reason for not, or only occasionally, writing about then. Since these blogs are regularly updated with news, howtos and information on made progress, I’ve decided not to just copy, paste and republish what’s on those blogs.

To find out more about OpenBSD, visit the OpenBSD Journal. The DragonflyBSD digest is updated regularly with news relating to DragonflyBSD, and lately a lot on the progress of the newly created and much promising Hammer File System (HammerFS), whilst Hubert’s NetBSD blog brings the latest and greatest with regards to NetBSD.

Of course there are more many blogs and websites tracking the “big four”, but these are the best as far as I’m aware.

BSD Magazine – update

Just a quick update with regards the BSD Magazine post that I put on yesterday.

Dru Lavigne has received the BSD magazine today and posted the contents of this issue on her blog:

  • Dru Lavigne, FreeBSD 7.0 Installation and Configuration
  • Michael Lucas, FreeBSD’s bsnmp
  • Jan Stedehouder, Pushing BSD an an Open Source Desktop
  • Svetoslav Chukov, PC-BSD Overview
  • Richard Bejtlich, Sguil 0.7.0 on FreeBSD 7.0
  • Jay Kruizenga, How to Dual-Boot Vista with BSD
  • Peter Hansteen, Keep Smiling, Waste Spammers’ Time
  • Henrik Lund Kramshoj, Defense in Depth and FOSS
  • Donald Hayford, NetBSD on the NSSSSLU2
  • Girish Venkatachalam, OpenBSD pf
  • Eric Schnoebelen, Instant Messaging with jabber/XMPP
  • Federico Biancuzzi, Interview with FreeBSD Developer Jeff Roberson
  • Mikel King, What is in a Certification
  • Henrik Lund Kramshoj, Review of the Book of PF

BSD Magazine #1 published

BSD Magazine issue #1 is out. Really good to see that the first BSD Magazine has come out and is being distributed. Congratulations to the team!

There are several types of subscriptions for this magazine, i.e. print subscription, electronic subscription and the corporate subscription for companies.

More than 60 pages full of news, great articles, tutorials, how-tos and extras:

1. what’s new (section for news: new releases, upcoming events, latest products)
2. get started (installation and configuration articles)
3. how-tos (tutorials, how-tos, guides on various topics)
4. admin (articles about system administration and security)
5. mms (multimedia section)
6. tips & tricks (useful tips for beginners and advanced)
7.let’s talk (section where BSD users and professionals can share their general thoughts about BSD and Open Source)

For more details or subscribing, visit the website.

Don’t miss your chance to explore BSD world !

Update – 24/04/2008

BSD Magazin #1 published

BSD Magazine – update

Over the last weekend and the beginning of this week I received some emails  from readers who were unable to contact anyone behind the BSD Magazine.

Today Kate emailed me saying that there are some problems with the website and other IT problems, but if you want, you can email her with any suggestions, articles etc etc on katarzyna.kaczor [@] lpmagazine [.] org

BSD Magazine – it’s coming!

BSD Magazine LogoI blogged before that there were plans of creating a FreeBSD Magazine. Just to let you know that the first issue can be expected around April 2008. It won’t be just about FreeBSD, but also about other BSD OSses, incl. OpenBSD and NetBSD, hence the name BSD Magazine. The website is now live at bsdmag.org. If you want to contribute or find out more about BSD Magazine, visit the website or contact Kate or Caroline.

Dru Lavige, Jan Stedehouder and myself will be writing something for the 1st issue.

Exciting future ahead for BSD

FreeBSD LogoTrollaxor has written up an interesting piece about the history and future of the major BSD systems: FreeBSD, netBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD and Darwin.

In the new year the Berkeley Software Distribution family of Unix-like operating systems is growing at a phenomenal rate and excitement over the possibilities for this operating system family is in the air. After unprecedented development and adoption as well as major shifts in the marketplace, it’s time to take a look at what’s new with this demonic family of operating systems.

FreeBSD

FreeBSD 5 was the darkest period in this operating system’s history and morale and marketshare were at an all-time low. The problem originated from merging BSD/OS into FreeBSD; though the two systems shared a lot of code, the difference of just a couple years was staggering. FreeBSD’s virtual memory and multi-processing code was immature, while BSD/OS’s libraries were archaic. Mating the two was a mess that cost FreeBSD face and kept users on an older branch from the Nineties, 4.11.

Now, with FreeBSD 7.0b on the horizon promising to wrap it all up, FreeBSD is once again taking the free Unix world by storm. It’s a tight, efficient codebase leveraging the best of BSD/OS, Darwin, and FreeBSD that users have been clamoring for. FreeBSD users and sites now have a shining future ahead of them.

… [discusses NetBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD & Darwin]

With all of these great improvements to the Berkeley operating system family in the last few years, BSD is clearly where it’s at. Linux is a throwback to when Open Source was a hot buzzword and sharing code was a novel idea. Now, Apple and company use it as standard coding procedure to share and improve the tech they have and leverage their individual strengths.

Even when taking the few commercial Unices that still exist into account, like AIX and Solaris, BSD still owns the arena in its frantic steamroll to the top of the supercomputing mountain. Whether you want the general wholesomeness of FreeBSD, the KGB-like security of OpenBSD, the more experimental NetBSD or DragonFlyBSD, or the utter perfection of Mac OS X, BSD has your bases completely covered with room to grow in the future.

Read the whole article here