Kylin OS – more details and download links

My last post on Kylin, China’s secure, FreeBSD based operating system, has raised quite a bit of interest and people have been asking for download links.

I’ve done some more research into Kylin, and came across the main Kylin website: kylin-os.com (Chinese). The government seems to have set up a company, Kyrin,  to research, develop, promote, educate and deploy Kylin in government departments and commercial enterprices, e.g.

  • China Construction Bank
  • North China Electric Power
  • Xiangcai Securities
  • Shanghai Unicom

Kirin also develops load balancing servers, NAS storage systems,  secure network storage (SecStor) and a Linux based Kylin version.

It’s interesting to note that NeoKylin, or any replacement for Kylin, is developed by China Standard Software and the National University of Defense Technology, and not by Kirin.

What is the reasoning (for the government) to begin developing a new product? Was Kylin with its proprietary security layer not secure enough? Or, is NeoKylin just another domestic Chinese product built with government sponsorship and funding like redflag-linux?

For the record, Kylin 2.1 is Freebsd 5.3 + linux_base-fc4. If you’re familiar with Chinese, you may download Kylin 2.1 from freebsdcentral.com:

I’ve not been able to get my fingers on Kylin 3.0 (yet).

More on Kylin OS (use Google Translate):

Kylin, a Chinese FreeBSD based, secure O/S

The Kylin operating system is a server operating system focusing on high performance, availability and security. Its initial developement was  funded by a Chinese government-sponsored Research and Development (R&D) program in 2002. The first public version of Kylin was released in 2007.

Kylin is based on FreeBSD 5.3 with some proprietary security extensions to add an extra level of security to that operating system. Kylin, named after qili, a mythical beast, has been organised in a hierarchy model, including the basic kernel layer which is responsible for initializing the hardware and providing basic memory management and task management, the system service layer which is based on FreeBSD providing UFS2 and BSD network protocols, and the desktop environment which is similar to Windows. It has been designed to comply with the UNIX standards and is compatible with Linux binaries.

Operating systems currently used in China are mainly developed overseas, and it seems to become clearer that it is a national strategy to develop China-owned computer software to replace proprietary software produced in the West. Kylin is approved for use by the People’s Liberation Army and has apparently been deployed in Chinese military, national defence and sensitive government organisations since 2007. Kylin is also being used in finance, governance and education.

(sources used: EuroBSDCon 2005 lecture and Wikipedia)