GhostBSD 2.5 RC2 available for testing

The second release candidate (RC) for the upcoming GhostBSD 2.5, which is based on FreeBSD 9.0-RC2, is now available for download.

Notable changes from RC1 include:

  • added WiFi Network Manager for easier wireless connection configuration; additionally, the WiFi card is now being configured during live medium boot-up,
  • added Florence virtual keyboard for future touch screen development,
  • added e2fsprogs to support ext2, ext3 and ext4 filesystem.

GhostBSD lite (CD medium) will be a little late this time. We have decided to swap GNOME for LXDE desktop in that version.

More details regarding this release, known issues and bug reporting can be found in the announcement: GhostBSD 2.5 RC2 available for testing

PC-BSD 9.0-RC3 available

Following the release of FreeBSD 9.0-RC3, PC-BSD 9.0-RC3, a Unix-like, desktop-oriented operating system based on FreeBSD, is ready for testing.

This release contains numerous bug fixes and enhancements, and can also be downloaded as VMware and VirtualBox images.

Some of the changes and improvements are:

  • Fixed the default KDE wallpaper / desktop theme
  • Add option to skip performing system upgrades at bootup, in case the user doesn’t have the time to wait.
  • Fix bug starting the port jail from rc.d
  • Make sure we clear any KDE cache during upgrade
  • Fixed bugs installing some PBIs from AppCafe causing seg faults
  • Load ext2fs automatically
  • Default LXDE clock to AM/PM time
  • Add default openbox wallpaper / menus
  • Load the “iir” raid driver on install media
  • Add extra meta-pkg for VMware guest support
  • Reduce CPU usage while checking for system updates on the tray
  • Add new graphical boot loader enabled by default
  • Updated the handbook for 9.0
  • Speed up the download process of system upgrades
  • Add patch for GDM which corrects issues with auto-login

Via: PC-BSD 9.0-RC3 now available (PC-BSD blog)

pfSense private cloud, and pfSense jobs

Ray has been testing and playing around with pfSense for a month, and has decided he’s going to set up a private cloud: pfSense + 1 Public IP = Home Cloud.

Now that I’ve ben running pfSense for a problem-free month it’s time to start using it for more than cool charts and graphs. My first goal is to be able to make multiple servers available from the internet. I’ve got Windows Home Server v1 and Windows Home Server 2011 servers running and ready to go. Once those are going I’ll want to add my development web server to the mix so I can do development and testing from outside the home. I’ve spent some time testing various options and I’ve settled on a solution that I think will work. At least all the individual pieces work, time to see if they fit together.

The main obstacle for me is that I have one public IP which needs to address the various internal servers. Those internal servers run the same services on the same ports. The nature of NAT port forwarding is all traffic coming into the WAN connection for a port gets forwarded to the same computer. I can’t parse port 80 (http/web) traffic and make a decision where it needs to go. This is the major obstacle. Another minor issue is that my public IP is dynamic and can change whenever Comcast wants to change it. (Although when I want it to change it’s surprisingly hard to do).

Another requirement is that I use my own domain, and not just a subdomain of some DDNS provider.

Full post: pfSense +1  public ip = home Cloud

pfSense Jobs

If you’re interested in pfSense freelance jobs, have a look here: https://www.elance.com/r/jobs/q-pFsense. There’s one job at the moment.

pfSense, 7 years young. Congratulations

pfSense is Seven

The pfSense  (which stands for…) project exists 7 years this week, well, that is the age of the pfSense domain. I’m sure the project existed long before that in Chris Buechler, the project founder’s head.

Congratulations to Chris and his team for the great job they’re doing and all the work they’ve done so far. According to some update stats there are currently ca. 100,000 known live pfSense installs.

pfSense and PBI’s

Some say that PC-BSD‘s PBI package format is not needed in addition to other *BSD ways of installing software, and that it’s “un-UNIX”. I think it’s a very user-friendly, point-and-click way for installing software, and advanced users don’t need to use it.

It’s great to see that not only FreeNAS, the NAS O/S, but also pfSense will be supporting PBI packages in the future:

Moving packages to PBIs – the package system in 2.1 will switch to using the PBI package system, originally from PC-BSD, though also used by some on stock FreeBSD installs. The benefit of using PBIs is each package has all its dependencies included in the package, which eliminates the dependency messes that can happen currently, such as one package requiring a certain version of a dependent package but another requiring a different version, uninstallation of one package stomping on another package by uninstalling a dependency it requires, uninstallation of a package breaking the base system by deleting things it uses (though we already work around that one automatically), easing clean uninstall of packages, amongst other benefits. This will be a great improvement in the package system for 2.1. (source)

If you’re looking for a feature rich (BSD) firewall, why not consider pfSense?

Embedded Monowall Installation (video)

This tutorial will guide you through copying the m0n0wall image to a compact flash card and the initial configuration of the m0n0wall on the ALIX embedded board. I will be using a VPN accelerator card since I will have about 10 IPsec tunnels actively running at one time. I would only recommend using the VPN accelerator card if you plan on maintaining several VPN tunnels at one time, otherwise it is overkill.


Debian GNU/kFreeBSD on production

Debian GNU/kFreeBSD is a port that consists of GNU userland using the GNU C library on top of FreeBSD’s kernel, coupled with the regular Debian package set. This project is still very much work-in-progress. Rebort has Millan has a summary post of recent changes and updates: Recent improvements with Debian GNU/kFreeBSD

Robert has been using Debian GNU/kFreeBSD for a few week and writes:

Yesterday I begun using Debian GNU/kFreeBSD “squeeze” in thorin, my main workstation.

During the last few weeks I had to work through some of the limitations that were holding me back, such automated driver load and FUSE. I was lucky enough that other people filled the missing pieces I wanted, such as NFS client support and a GRUB bugfix that broke booting from Mirrored pools.

I have to say that I’m very satisfied. Barring a pair of small nuissances, the result is quite impressive: more…

PC-BSD 9.0RC1 available & new website

The first release candidate for the upcoming PC-BSD 9.0 is now available! This release includes the latest FreeBSD 9.0-RC1 base, along with numerous bug fixes and enhancements.

Notable changes in this release are:

  • Added support for installing to BootCamp partitions on Apple OSX systems
  • Added checks for invalid characters in the username
  • Added button to installer allowing toggle between US keyboard layout and currently selected
  • Added improved portjail init scripts
  • Life-Preserver now defaults to backing up to a remote directory set as the client hostname
  • Add some sanity checks to pbi-manager when creating new repositories
  • Fixed bugs setting the proxy server in pbi-manager / AppCafe (Uses the default config in networking GUI)
  • Improved the default firewall ruleset
  • Enable IPv6 support on all nic’s by default
  • Added options to pbi-manager which enables tmpfs memory building
  • Improved pc-thinclient setup to use pre-built FreeBSD world instead of building from source
  • Fix bug in pbi-manager when doing binary updates to ensure it is only attempted on the correct build
  • Fix issues installing with mirrors / raidz on ZFS

Source: PC-BSD 9.0RC1 Available (PC-BSD blog)

Have you seen PC-BSD’s new website? It has now the same look and feel as FreeNAS and iXsystems (Both PC-BSD and FreeNAS are projects supported by iXsystems).