AskoziaPBX – project update

askozia-pbx logo 100x100Askozia has set up a shop for components and pre-built appliances, with a percentage of all sales going into further development of AskoziaPBX.

AskoziaPBX: Porting to Linux, Going for Mainstream

We’re currently in the process of porting Askozia®PBX (an Open Source PBX solution based on Asterisk) to use Linux as its base operating system. This allows us to support architectures other than x86 and take advantage of Asterisk features not available on FreeBSD.

Many manufacturers have expressed interest in having a turn-key software solution available for their hardware offerings. Auerswald, a large German telephony equipment manufacturer, has sponsored our initial port to Linux and the Blackfin CPU architecture, now offering AskoziaPBX as an alternate firmware for their upcoming COMpact 3000 VoIP device.

What is needed for Asterisk based distributions to become as mainstream as a FRITZ!Box?

Asterisk’s flexibility lets it be tailored to different markets; which ones are laying undiscovered?

Watch the video or listen to MP3

New Release : 1.0.3

Another small update to the 1.0 series has been released adding a French localization (submitted by Jean-Pierre Lozano) as well as updating the Japanese and German localizations.

Also, the last few hard-coded AskoziaPBX strings have been made customizable for our branding customers. Your updated versions are also available for download.

Comparison between pfSense and Check Point

pfsense logo 100x100Jake describes his experiences with router systems pfSense and Check Point

After been using the CheckPoint safe@office in a live environment for almost two month I have now decided to go back to using my homebuilt pfSense firewall.

Both firewalls have pros and cons. For me the pros of the pfSense made it for me. The biggest pros of the pfSense is definitely the speed. Even if both firewalls are able to deliver around 100 mbit/s throughput, the CheckPoint has some nasty lags sometimes, and drops the connections sometimes to IRC, MSN, ICQ and also webdownloads. Even thou I made a rule to allow all those protocols. Anyway, the biggest pros of the CheckPoint is without a doubt it’s power consumption, heat and sound level. It has a power consumption of about 15-20W compared to my pfSense which is about 60W. No heat or whatsoever from the CheckPoint either. And it makes NO sound at all, it’s fanless.

Whole article here (cyberinfo.se – 06/10/2009)

pfSense is also mentioned at the bottom of the “Enterprises cut costs with open-source routers” article on news.idg.no

The future of the DesktopBSD project

desktopbsd logo 100x100A few months ago we were wondering what was happening with DesktopBSD (DesktopBSD; what’s happened). Peter Hofer, the founder of the project, has now put an update on the DBSD Forums:

Still, as some may have noticed, I have been able to work on some smaller improvements within the last few months. I now have the impression that everything is in order for a release 1.7, also considering that FreeBSD 7.2 has been released this week and should make a stable base system.

Therefore, I would like to release 1.7 as soon as I have some time on my hands. I would appreciate any comments on the recent snapshots (both i386 and amd64) from May 2nd. You can get them from here, as always:

ftp://ftp.desktopbsd.net/pub/DesktopBSD/Snapshots/
ftp://ftp.freepark.org/pub/DesktopBSD/snapshots/

Please understand that there is no room for larger changes such as KDE 4, new features or major bugfixes (unless critical).

Many thanks to Fernando for emailing this story.

Easy Jailing with The (PC-BSD) Warden

Graham from the IT Massive has put together a useful tutorial how to setup a jails in PC-BSD. The easiness and straight-forwardness is for him one of the reasons he’s using PC-BSD:

The Warden/FreeBSD Jails is one of the reasons that I use PC-BSD/FreeBSD. One possible use on the desktop would be a web application developer that wants to keep all the server programs out of the base system and possibly share access with a friend you don’t fully trust. I use The Warden for a similar role personally and I like the fact that at any point I can just stop, move or delete the jail to make the services go away.

With The Warden GUI it makes the FreeBSD jails technology more accessible to the users on the desktop and there is little reason not to use it if your setting up a server for your network. If you are a bit paranoid about security this may help you sleep at night. Overall I was impressed with the simplicity of using the software with the initial importing of the Inmate file the only issue that came up. However I would like to see a little more visual feedback in the output particularly in the creation of jails. I would be happy to recommend The Warden to other security minded friends that are starting with BSD.

Check out the howto here (theitmassive.com – 26/05/20209)

PC-BSD with XFCE window manager

PC-BSD Software has now made an XFCE PBI available. PC-BSD comes with KDE4 pre-installed, but if you prefer a lightweight window manager, this one is for you.

The Gnome window manager PBI can be downloaded here.

Another interesting PBI is the Thin Client Server. This PBI installs dhcpd and configures PC-BSD as a Thin Client Server. Clients connected to the servers NIC, will be able to network boot via DHCPD & PXE, and then be brought to a KDM login screen. For more details about this PBI, please read through our Thin Client Wiki

PC-BSD – Making FreeBSD on the Desktop a reality – Kris Moore

FreeBSD has a reputation for its rock-solid reliability, and top-notch performance in the server world, but is noticeably absent when it comes to the vast market of desktop computing.

Why is this? FreeBSD offers many, if not almost all of the same open-source packages and software that can be found in the more popular Linux desktop distributions, yet even with the speed and reliability FreeBSD offers, a relative few number of users are deploying it on their desktops. In this presentation we will take a look at some of the reasons why FreeBSD has not been as widely adopted in the desktop market as it has on the server side. Several of the desktop weaknesses of FreeBSD will be shown, along with how we are trying to fix these short-comings through a desktopcentric version of FreeBSD, known as PCBSD. We will also take a look at the package management system employed by all open-source operating systems alike, and some of the pitfalls it brings, which may hinder widespread desktop adoption.

This talk was done at AsiaBSDCon 2009

PDF summary - Direct video link