TrueNAS Unified Storage Appliance now Citrix Certified

ixsystems logoiXsystems, the all-around FreeBSD company that builds FreeBSD certified servers and storage solutions, has announced that their TrueNAS Unified Storage Appliance has been now been certified as Citrix Ready.

“The Citrix Ready program helps customers identify third party solutions that are recommended to enhance virtualization, networking, and cloud computing solutions from Citrix. TrueNAS completed a rigorous verification process to ensure compatibility with Citrix XenServer®, providing confidence in joint solution compatibility.

The Citrix Ready program makes it easy for customers to identify complementary products and solutions that can enhance Citrix environments. Customers can be confident that TrueNAS™ has successfully passed a series of tests established by Citrix, and can be trusted to work effectively with XenServer to keep virtual machines available and business running smoothly.

TrueNAS has been verified for use with XenServer through both NFS and iSCSI. TrueNAS includes a wide variety of protocols and services to support both file-based and block-based usage. Completion of Citrix Ready verification is a step forward, confirming TrueNAS’s ability to integrate into virtualized environments. Many iXsystems clients already back their XenServer infrastructure with TrueNAS, enjoying easy management and reliable performance.

As a member of the Citrix Ready program, we are able to offer our clients intelligent solutions that combine TrueNAS unified storage with Citrix XenServer,” said Peter Allen, Applied Engineering Specialist. “The offering demonstrates our plans to work with trusted partners, through the Citrix Ready partner ecosystem, in order to provide the highest quality experience for our clients.”

The TrueNAS Unified Storage Appliance is Trusted to Enhance Citrix Virtualization Solutions

Debian GNU/kFreeBSD vs Debian 7.0 GNU/Linux

debian_logoWith the new Debian 7.0 Wheezy released, it was time for Phoronix to update some benchmarks comparing Debian GNU/kFreeBSD vs Debian 7.0: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD vs Debian 7.0 GNU/Linux. The outcomes have not changed much since last December’s test: Debian is overall slightly faster.

This is just for info only, let’s not get into Debian vs FreeBSD discussion.

I just wonder why the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD is used as project name. Well, I understand why, but it’s such a mouthful. Why not rename the project to DebianBSD or DebBSD?

About Debian GNU/kFreeBSD: Debian GNU/kFreeBSD is an operating system released by the Debian project, which uses the FreeBSD kernel, instead of the Linux kernel. “kFreeBSD” stands for “”kernel of FreeBSD” and “GNU/kFreeBSD” means “GNU with kernel of FreeBSD”. By combining a FreeBSD kernel with GNU based userland, Debian GNU/kFreeBSD supports PF, ZFS, Jails, NDIS drivers and is potentially less vulnerable to legal challenges.

PC-BSD Hardware Store Opened

PC-BSD LogoJosh Smith has announced the initial launch of the PC-BSD hardware store. This resource is meant to make it easier to find hardware that has been tested to work on PC-BSD.

FreeBSD and PC-BSD are known to be quite particular with regards to hardware support, but now you can check or buy via the PC-BSD store hardware that is known to be working on PC-BSD, and therefore also on FreeBSD. Obviously you can always check the FreeBSD Hardware Notes that come out with each release, e.g. FreeBSD 10 Current9.0, 9.1 or 8.3.

So, if you want to make sure that your hardware is supported by PC-BSD or FreeBSD check the FreeBSD Hardware Notes, PC-BSD wiki hardware section or the PC-BSD Hardware Store. (via)

JabirBSD, a new FreeBSD based project

jabirbsdMuhammadreza Haghiri emailed me about the release of the JabirBSD 1.0.

JabirBSD is a rebranded FreeBSD version for Iranian and Farsi speaking users “with rsync, sudo, nano and a lot of command-line based software”.

This first release is a re-branded version of FreeBSD, with the intention to fork from FreeBSD at a later point. The reason for this forking is, allegedly, due to kernel related changes.

I think it’s great to see developers wanting to take FreeBSD to the next level, but, it could be just me, I’m a bit weary of these new projects. Most of them fall by the wayside due to loss of interest, too small teams or lack of spare time (SecurityBSD TrueBSD, Evoke etc). Unless the project is backed by a company (although that’s not a 100% guarantee – remember Tomahawk Desktop?) or a large team, most of the time the project fizzles out and ceases to exist.

I wish the developers had started off by contributing to FreeBSD (PC-BSD, TrueOS) before deciding to set up their own project, and potentially fork. At the moment JabirBSD 1.0 is the same as FreeBSD and it is not clear how JabirBSD is going to be different from FreeBSD.

Unless developers that already contribute to FreeBSD (or any other project) want to move the project in an incompatible or opposite direction, forking maybe the way forward, but taking that decision should always be a last resort. IMO

JabirBSD 1.0 released

BSDTalk interview with Kris Moore (PC-BSD)

Podcast LogosBSDTalk has a 12 minutes interview with Kris Moore (BSDTalk225) about PC-BSD, recorded at BSDCan 2013. Listen to the podcast as MP3 or OGG.

Previous interviews with Kris Moore can be found here:

PC-BSD, a friendly first-time contributor project

IT World has identified 7 open source projects that are friendly to the first-time contributor to get their teeth in.

Apart from LibreOffice, PostgreSQL and Ubuntu, IT World also shortlists PC-BSD:

PC-BSD Logo

“If Ubuntu sounds interesting, but you want something a little off the beaten path, Dru Lavigne, Director of Community Development at iXsystems, recommends PC-BSD. Based on FreeBSD (which is based on BSD UNIX), PC-BSD is a relatively young desktop operating system funded by iXsystems.

Lavigne says that the PC-BSD Users Handbook makes it easy to get up to speed.

“A whole chapter of the User Handbook is dedicated to the various ways one can get started contributing to the project,”

she says. If documentation is your thing, simply create a wiki account, and get started.

“Editors review and discuss changes to help the writer clearly explain the concepts they are writing about,”

Lavigne explains.

If you’re not ready to dive right in to PC-BSD yet, the forums and IRC channel can help you get familiar with the project community.

“The project and its regular contributors work hard to keep the atmosphere friendly, nip inappropriate behaviour in the bud, and provide an area where users are comfortable helping each other,”

Lavigne says.”

It’s great to see PC-BSD shortlisted. Read the whole article here:

7 open source projects to cut your teeth on (and the ones to avoid) (itworld)

PC-BSD announces pkgng Package Repository for PC-BSD and FreeBSD 9.1

pc-bsd logo 100x100The PC-BSD Project has announced the details on how to access their new PKGNG repository, for PC-BSD and FreeBSD 9.1-Release systems.

“This package repository is frequently updated, usually bi-weekly, with the latest and greatest from the FreeBSD ports tree. We will be using this repository for the PC-BSD rolling release edition, but it can also be used anywhere else you need packages on a PC-BSD or FreeBSD 9.1-RELEASE system. This can include FreeBSD, TrueOS, PC-BSD, Jails and more. Getting setup to use this new repository is easy, and only requires minimal configuration.

For detailed instructions, take a look at the step-by-step directions on the PC-BSD wiki.” (pcbsd blog)