MaheshaBSD-2.0 Server Released

Juraj Sipos has announced the release of MaheshaBSD Server 2.0. This version comes with WordPress running on a USB memory stick.

This is the only distro in the World with WordPress running immediately without any installation process. Many poor people will have a quick FTP server with WordPress and they may open it also to the world.

Some brief notes on this release:

  • With phpMyAdmin installed in MaheshaBSD Server many tasks with MySQL will be easy as a breeze.
  • phpMyAdmin runs also remotely via TightVNC.
  • The USB image is writable.
  • MaheshaBSD Server has an educational purpose, too. It is also a social project. Many people in the Third World need money for education and many institutions fail to provide the valuable infrastructure (software, paying for development of software, etc.).
  • The SERVER was tested over the Internet;
  • tightvnc worked,
  • WordPress worked.

The Mahesha Project is hosted by RootBSD. You may download the documentation (pdf) or download the MaheshaBSD Server 2.0 (rar).

MaheshaBSD Server can be downloaded and used for free by individuals; companies are expected to donate to the project:

The price is 200/150/100/50/25, but only for institutions; it is free for personal use. Institutions may choose any price, thus the software will be valuable also for institutions in very poor countries. Anybody can write and use it for free.

Thanks Juraj for the heads up. I will be testing this release over the next few days and will give you feedback.

FreeNAS 8.3.1-RC1 now available

freenas-ixsystems-new-logoThe FreeNAS development team has announced FreeNAS 8.3.1-RC1 which will be the first and only release candidate planned for the final version of FreeNAS 8.3.1-RELEASE.

FreeNAS 8.3.1 is based on FreeBSD 8.3 with version 28 of the ZFS filesystem, and features volume based encryption for ZFS volumes.

There have been no major changes between 8.3.1-BETA3 and RC1, mostly
bugfixes and minor usability improvements to the GUI.  See the release notes for a complete list.

Images and plugins can be downloaded from the project’s SourceForge webpage.

PC-BSD 9.1 Rolling Release

PC-BSD LogoKris, lead developer of the PC-BSD project, mentioned a couple of weeks ago (http://goo.gl/Atzu5) that he was planning a rolling release for PC-BSD. Generally this was well received within the PC-BSD community.

Kris has now uploaded a first ISO to test the rolling release with feedback from those interested to try this. In his announcement he mentions that PC-BSD is now kept up-to-date with PKGNG and that it is now also possible to convert a FreeBSD server to PC-BSD or TrueOS:

“As a few of you have already noticed, we have some new ISOs now up on the mirrors:

http://mirrors.isc.org/pub/pcbsd/9.1-RELEASE/

These are the first images built of PC-BSD Rolling Release, based upon FreeBSD 9.1-RELEASE, which use PKGNG as the backend for keeping your desktop and base-system packages up to date. You are welcome to download and give them a spin if you want to help us beta-test them.

They include updated packages from about 2 weeks ago, which includes KDE 4.9.5 among others. Our build server is still finishing up building the entire package repository and I hope to have all ~20k pkgng packages online in another week or so, with weekly updates after that. The weekly updates will include all the latest PC-BSD / TrueOS utilities, so you can expect to see much more frequent bug fixes & enhancements.

For users running on the original PC-BSD / TrueOS 9.1 release, I also have an online system update in the works. This update will convert your existing install to PKGNG and allow you to start tracking the rolling release, the same as if you installed a fresh copy from our new ISOs. Once I’ve finished a bit more testing & bugfixing with it, I will post back with details on how to try it out. I’m hopeful it will be sometime next week.

Lastly, I also wanted to let you know that with this change, it will be possible convert an existing “FreeBSD” 9.1-Release into a PC-BSD or TrueOS system. I’ve started writing instructions on the PC-BSD wiki page with details:

http://wiki.pcbsd.org/index.php/Turn_FreeBSD_into_PC-BSD%C2%AE

Last but not least, we have some new hardware coming in soon which I will quickly get working on building a PC-BSD -STABLE release, and then -CURRENT. More details as they arrive :)

Happy testing, and please post your feedback to the list so we can get to work quashing bugs.”

Great job, Kris. Will need to give this a whirl.

FreeNAS 8.3.1-BETA3 is now available

freenas-ixsystems-new-logoThe FreeNAS development team has announce the availability of FreeNAS 8.3.1-BETA3.  This is the last planned public beta of 8.3.1 as it moves towards the final.

FreeNAS 8.3.1 adds ZFS volume encryption to the features available in FreeNAS 8.3.0.  BETA3 has a number of bug fixes and feature requests based on community feedback and testing of the first two beta releases, as well as feedback and bug fixes from FreeNAS 8.3.0-RELEASE-p1.

There are no further betas planned as +FreeNAS 8.3.1 marches towards the final release.  At this point there will be no additional features added to 8.3.1.

Virtio drivers have been added to the image.  For this BETA they default to off, which makes them a bit difficult to use.

FreeNAS 8.3.1-BETA3 can be downloaded from the following location:
https://sourceforge.net/projects/freenas/files/FreeNAS-8.3.1/BETA3/

Android on FreeBSD

gferenc88 wrote up a guide showing how to get Android running in Oracle VM VirtualBox on FreeBSD.

Maybe it is not a big thing, but I have managed to run the Android OS with OpenGL support on FreeBSD.

Before we start, you must have enabled the Linuxulator and install the Linux base distribution from ports (emulators/linux_base-f10).

Here is how he did it: Android on FreeBSD

android freebsd

 

bsdroid google android

BSDroid was a project that ported the Android framework to FreeBSD, and the main goal of project was to provide native binaries for tools and make it possible to develop Android applications on FreeBSD powered system without Android SDK for Linux.

Unfortunately, it has gone all quiet. Does anybody know what’s happening with BSDroid?

PC-BSD Status Update and Future Plans

PC-BSD LogoKris Moore has laid out his plans for the future of PC-BSD, especially around PC-BSD moving to rolling releases.

First of all, I want to let you know, that I’ve personally not been satisfied with the frequency of PC-BSD releases and updates. With us tracking the upstream FreeBSD releases, it has really tied our hands getting new releases out to the public. The past couple of releases had a delay of almost a year between them, which is WAY too long in my opinion. To further compound the problem, our build system wasn’t designed to do frequent updates of packages and our utilities, which made getting updates out to the community a long and tedious process. This is all going to change. What we are looking at going to now is more of a “Rolling-Release” model, first for our utilities & system packages, and eventually for the FreeBSD base itself.

Read the whole post: Status update and future plans

Making computing easier: PC-BSD 9.1

pc-bsd logo 100x100Distrowatch has favourable review of recently released PC-BSD 9.1:

…”Nothing is perfect and PC-BSD does have an Achilles’ heel, specifically hardware compatibility. As much as I enjoyed the polish and the features and the wonderful ease of use, I suspect hardware support will be the make or break issue for most people. On my desktop machine I could get PC-BSD working, but only with reduced resolution and video performance. On my laptop things basically worked well, but it took a little tinkering to get my wireless card up and running. When running the operating system in a virtual machine I installed the VirtualBox guest additions, but couldn’t get PC-BSD to display its desktop at full resolution. Luckily hardware support with PC-BSD is not a trial and error process, the hardware compatibility tool takes the surprises out of testing the distribution, even when running from the plain installation media.

I definitely recommend trying PC-BSD. This new release has really taken a step forward in usability and features compared to where the project was even a year ago. I would say 9.1 brings to the table a level of ease of use and trouble-free administration only found in a few of the top ranking Linux distributions. It is well worth the time to test drive this latest release.”

You can read the review in its entirety here: Making computing easier: PC-BSD 9.1.

If you’re not going to install PC-BSD 9.1 but are curious what it looks like, have a look at the screenshots on Chris Haney’s website.