FreeBSD quick news and links (GhostBSD, Centreon, FreeBSD Dev, iXsystems)

GhostBSD 2.5: A GNOME-ified FreeBSD 9.0

If you want to try out FreeBSD 9.0 this holiday but are not turned on by the actual FreeBSD 9.0 install and setup process, nor find the KDE desktop of PC-BSD 9.0 enjoyable, you may want to try out GhostBSD 2.5.

GhostBSD 2.5: A GNOME-ified FreeBSD 9.0


Centreon 2.3.3 on FreeBSD 9

This tutorial will guide the user to complete the installation of Centreon on FreeBSD. We will be using an installation on a FreeBSD 9.0-PRERELEASE kernel version, kernel version does not influence the tutorial.

What is the Centreon? Centreon is a powerful tool for monitoring hosts and services, it is a frontend that works on top of Nagios, adding many features for viewing and alert history, status, etc. ..

Centreon 2.3.3 on FreeBSD 9


Debian GNU/kFreeBSD Gets Ready For FreeBSD 9.0

It’s not only the FreeBSD and PC-BSD camps gearing up for the imminent release of FreeBSD 9.0, but Debian developers have already been gearing up for the major update of this leading BSD distribution as they prepare to pull in its new kernel.

Debian GNU/kFreeBSD Gets Ready For FreeBSD 9.0


Top 6 Linux and BSD graphical installation programs

PC-BSD’s installation setup is one of them: Top 6 Linux and BSD graphical installation programs.


FreeBSD Development over 13 Years

This video shows the visual development of FreeBSD with its committers.

iXsystems Haiku Contest

Do you have the creativity/humor/love for FreeBSD and PC-BSD? Then submit an original haiku poem.

Here at iXsystems we always love hearing what you have to say, and what better way to celebrate the upcoming PC-BSD 9.0 release than indulging in some creative writing? We’ll gladly give away a PC-BSD shirt to the winner, and immortalize his/her haiku up on our Facebook and Google+ sites. (via)

bsdtalk210 – James Nixon from iXsystems

Interview with James Nixon from iXsystems at the LISA 2011 conference in Boston.

bsdtalk210 – James Nixon from iXsystems


BSDs ‘lost’ just because of this phone number 1-800-ITS-UNIX

BSD ‘lost’ because of a phone number? Nonsense.

Four of the BSD guys had just formed a company to sell BSD commercially. They even had a nice phone number: 1-800-ITS-UNIX. That phone number did them and me in. AT&T sued them over the phone number and the lawsuit took 3 years to settle. That was precisely the period Linux was launched and BSD was frozen due to the lawsuit

Interview with Andrew Tanenbaum


FreeBSD Security Advisories

PAMPAM_sshtelnetdchroot, and bind.

pfSense private cloud, and pfSense jobs

Ray has been testing and playing around with pfSense for a month, and has decided he’s going to set up a private cloud: pfSense + 1 Public IP = Home Cloud.

Now that I’ve ben running pfSense for a problem-free month it’s time to start using it for more than cool charts and graphs. My first goal is to be able to make multiple servers available from the internet. I’ve got Windows Home Server v1 and Windows Home Server 2011 servers running and ready to go. Once those are going I’ll want to add my development web server to the mix so I can do development and testing from outside the home. I’ve spent some time testing various options and I’ve settled on a solution that I think will work. At least all the individual pieces work, time to see if they fit together.

The main obstacle for me is that I have one public IP which needs to address the various internal servers. Those internal servers run the same services on the same ports. The nature of NAT port forwarding is all traffic coming into the WAN connection for a port gets forwarded to the same computer. I can’t parse port 80 (http/web) traffic and make a decision where it needs to go. This is the major obstacle. Another minor issue is that my public IP is dynamic and can change whenever Comcast wants to change it. (Although when I want it to change it’s surprisingly hard to do).

Another requirement is that I use my own domain, and not just a subdomain of some DDNS provider.

Full post: pfSense +1  public ip = home Cloud

pfSense Jobs

If you’re interested in pfSense freelance jobs, have a look here: https://www.elance.com/r/jobs/q-pFsense. There’s one job at the moment.

pfSense, 7 years young. Congratulations

pfSense is Seven

The pfSense  (which stands for…) project exists 7 years this week, well, that is the age of the pfSense domain. I’m sure the project existed long before that in Chris Buechler, the project founder’s head.

Congratulations to Chris and his team for the great job they’re doing and all the work they’ve done so far. According to some update stats there are currently ca. 100,000 known live pfSense installs.

pfSense and PBI’s

Some say that PC-BSD‘s PBI package format is not needed in addition to other *BSD ways of installing software, and that it’s “un-UNIX”. I think it’s a very user-friendly, point-and-click way for installing software, and advanced users don’t need to use it.

It’s great to see that not only FreeNAS, the NAS O/S, but also pfSense will be supporting PBI packages in the future:

Moving packages to PBIs – the package system in 2.1 will switch to using the PBI package system, originally from PC-BSD, though also used by some on stock FreeBSD installs. The benefit of using PBIs is each package has all its dependencies included in the package, which eliminates the dependency messes that can happen currently, such as one package requiring a certain version of a dependent package but another requiring a different version, uninstallation of one package stomping on another package by uninstalling a dependency it requires, uninstallation of a package breaking the base system by deleting things it uses (though we already work around that one automatically), easing clean uninstall of packages, amongst other benefits. This will be a great improvement in the package system for 2.1. (source)

If you’re looking for a feature rich (BSD) firewall, why not consider pfSense?

How to configure a pfSense 2.0 Cluster using CARP

howtoforge.com has a easy to follow tutorial (How to configure a pfSense 2.0 Cluster using CARP) showing you how to set up a pfSense cluster with CARP.

In this HowTo I will show you how to configure a pfSense 2.0 Cluster using CARP Failover. pfSense is quite a advanced (open-source) firewall being used everywhere from homes to enterprise level networks, I have been playing around with pfsense now for the last 3 months and to be honest I am not looking back, it is packed full of features and can be deployed easily within minutes depending on your requirements.

This howto is based on this tutorial on pfSense’s website: Configuring pfSense Hardware Redundancy (CARP).

 

Released: pfSense 2.0

Chris Buechler has announced pfSense 2.0: 2.0 Release available

I’m proud to announce the release of version 2.0. This brings the past three years of new feature additions, with significant enhancements to almost every portion of the system. The changes and new features are summarized here. This is by far the most widely deployed release we’ve put out, thanks to the efforts of thousands of members of the community

Read the release post for update instructions, training sessions, credit, documentation etc

Links: pfSense website | Features and changes | Downloads

Quick news: Firewalls, VirtualBSD, pfSense

Below three links to posts on pfSense and VirtualBSD

Techsource has an overview of 5 firewalls, one of which is the FreeBSD based pfSense.

If you’re having a small computer network at home or a huge office with hundreds of desktops, cyber security is something you can never compromise on. One thing that is a quintessential part of security is something we call a firewall.

A firewall is like the security guard at your door who keeps a watch on everyone who goes in and out. By allowing only legitimate connections to pass through and blocking connections based on a certain set of rules, the firewall secures the network from most kinds of threats that lurk around on the Internet. … continues

VirtualBSD review – Sneak a peak at FreeBSD

FreeBSD is a UNIX-like operating system, designed to be super stable and super secure. As such, it is probably not the simplest one to tame and run on a daily basis. Unfortunately, reliability and robustness do not always fully align with the mass-usage model of friendliness.

BSD developers realize this. So they released VirtualBSD, a VMware virtual appliance built using Xfce desktop with a very pretty theme and lots of programs and utilities preinstalled. VirtualBSD is intended for people who have never tried BSD or never dared try, did not have the right hardware for the task, or former users struck by nostalgia. Whatever the motives, testing VirtualBSD has never seen easier.

The article concludes with:

While the virtual machine test is far from being a real-life example of how simple or difficult or well-integrated a desktop is, VirtualBSD is a pleasant, refreshing diversion from the mainstream of free operating systems. It is an excellent technology demonstrator. The appliance testdrive proves that BSD is not a monster. Far from it; it’s a witty, charming, highly useful platform that anyone could use.

Even if you never intend on using BSD on your machine as the primary desktop, VirtualBSD could shatter some of your fears and misconceptions about the dreadful UNIX. It may not eclipse the Linux just yet, and probably never will, and it does not have to. What it can do is become another alternative should you need it, should you seek it. Overall, VirtualBSD delivers a handsome punch of good quality in all aspects of the desktop usage, aesthetics, availability of programs, codecs, everything. Quite a surprise and a breath of fresh air.

Looking back at my flirtations with the BSD family, things are getting better, significantly. The critical turning point is not there yet, but in time, this operating system might stir the flames of competition in the software world. For the time being, you have the perfect appliance to play with and sharpen your UNIX skills.

Read the whole article: VirtualBSD review – Sneak a peak at FreeBSD

FreeBSD PF updated to 4.5 for FreeBSD 9

Bjoern Zeeb committed PF 4.5 into FreeBSD HEAD for the 9 release (which will be the basis of pfSense 2.1), ported by Ermal Luci with help from Bjoern and Max Laier. Much of this work was funded by pfSense / BSDPerimeter, aside from volunteer efforts from Bjoern and Max providing some guidance along the way and Bjoern especially for review and assistance. (full post: FreeBSD PF updated to 4.5 for FreeBSD 9)

pfSense 2.0-RC3 now available

Chris Buechler has announced Release Candidate 3 (RC3) of the upcoming pfSense 2.0. Changes and revision history can be tracked on github.

If you’re keen to find out what’s been added and changed in 2.0 in general, have a look at the pfSense 2.0 new features and changes page. The final release can be expected in about four weeks time.

Links: pfSense | pfSense RC3 announcement (pfSense blog)

pfSense FAQs

pfSense is an open source distribution of FreeBSD-based firewall which provides a platform for flexible and powerful routing and firewalling. The versatility of pfSense presents us with a wide array of configuration options.

Matt Williamson takes a look at some frequently asked questions on pfSense such as:

  • Q: What are the minimum hardware requirements for pfSense?
  • Q: How does pfSense identify and assign interfaces?
  • Q: How to enable the Secure Shell (SSH) service in pfSense?
  • Q: How does pfSense assign DNS servers to the DHCP clients?
  • Q: What happens if the Register DHCP Leases in DNS Forwarder is enabled?
  • Q: What is an alias? What are the different types of aliases in pfSense?
  • Q: How does the OpenVPN service work?
  • Q: What are Gateway Groups?
  • Q: How are bridged interfaces useful and how can one bridge together two interfaces in pfSense?
  • Q: What is OLSR and how is it enabled in pfSense?
  • Q: How to configure pfSense to automatically back up its configuration file?

For the answers, check out the pfSense FAQ page on the PacktPub website or the purchase the Matt’s pfSense 2 Cookbook for many more answers and guides.