MeetBSD 2010 videos available in HD on YouTube

The presentations from the recent MeetBSD 2010 (Cracow, Poland) conference are now available on the BSD Conferences Youtube Chanel. The following videos are all in HD quality and most are in English, though a few are in Polish.

  • Dru Lavigne – Update on BSD Certification
  • Hans Peter Selasky – The new USB stack in FreeBSD
  • Jakub Klama – FreeBSD on DaVinci DMSoC (polish)
  • Jan Srzednicki – What ideas can FreeBSD borrow from AIX?
  • Attilio Rao – The VFS/vnode interface in the FreeBSD kernel
  • Marko Zec – Network emulation using the virtualized network stack in FreeBSD
  • Pawe? Jakub Dawidek – HAST — Highly Available storage for FreeBSD (polish)
  • Pawe? Jakub Dawidek – HAST — Highly Available storage for FreeBSD (questions, polish)
  • Nikolay Aleksandrov – FreeBSD-based solution for Internet traffic management (S?awek ?ak – NoSQL)
  • Ramon Tancinco – meetBSD 2010 Welcome Intro
  • Martin Matuska – mfsBSD
  • Dmitri Epshtein – Advances in Embedded ARM processors, for performance driven applications
  • Warner Losh – Using FreeBSD in a Commercial Setting
  • (via)

    Miscelaneous FreeBSD news and links (week 32)

    1. FreeBSD East Coast Mirror

    Yesterday we posted the FreeBSD Foundation’s turns to NYI press release, Steven Kreuzer who was directly involved in the project has put more details on his website:

    Pretty much since the time that The NYC BSD Users Group was formed, The NY Internet Company have donated a full cabinet and a 10 Mb internet connection to NYCBUG. We used that space to host our website and mailing lists, hardware for developers and mirrors for all the major BSD projects.

    In October of 2009, I received an email inviting me to a grand opening party at NYI’s new state of the art data center located in Bridgewater, NJ. I asked some folks on core@ if they thought it would be worthwhile to approach NYI to see if they would be willing to donate a few cabinets so we could build out a FreeBSD mirror on the east coast. gnnjhb and I had a very informal meeting with Phil from NYI and after asking him if they would be willing to provide us with a few cabinets, some power and bandwidth, without thought or hesitation he said yes. The possibility of putting a mirror of FreeBSD.org on the east coast quickly became possible.

    Continues: East Coast FreeBSD Mirror

    2. FreeBSD VirtualBox Image for Port Maintainers

    This website provides 64bit VirtualBox Images for FreeBSD Port Maintainers with some common used software pre-installed.

    3. 10 Differences between Linux and BSD

    • Licenses
    • Control
    • Kernel vs operating system
    • UNIX/like
    • Base systems
    • More from source
    • Upgrades
    • Bleeding edge
    • Hardware support
    • User base

    Full post: 10 differences between Linux and BSD (techrepublic.com)

    4. Open Source projects that changed the world

    FreeBSD is one of them: Open source projects that changed the world (ostatic.com)

    5. BSDCan through the years

    Kirk Russell has posted a summary of BSDCan through the years on the Google Open Source Blog.

    I’m Kirk Russell, a Google Site Reliability Engineer who moves files around the cloud at a massive scale. I use BSD software on a daily basis — in my Android phone, my home NAS and my MacBook. My newest toy is a small ARM board that runs FreeBSD.

    Earlier this year I attended BSDCan, a software conference for BSD based operating systemprojects. I attended this conference to learn about new BSD technology that will someday become part of my daily life and to meet people with similar interests — there is time to chat in-between the scheduled talks and in the pub. BSDCan is a conference where I learn about new development that I can put to use both at work and at home. Learning these things from the original developers makes it that much more interesting.

    Here is a quick reflection on some highlights of past conferences:

    BSDCan through the years

    FreeBSD events and conferences (KyivBSD, MeetBSD, EuroBSD)

    Here is some info and details of upcoming FreeBSD related conferences and events.

    KyivBSD 2010 Conference

    On 25 Septempter the annual KyivBSD Conference will be held in Kiev, Ukraine. It’s mainly aimed at FreeBSD and PC-BSD users and developers.

    More info: http://ru.kyivbsd.org.ua (RU) (EN translation) (via)

    BSD-Day 2010

    BSD-Day@2010 will be held at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary on 20 November 2010.

    The purpose of this one-day event is to gather Central European developers of today’s open-source BSD systems, popularize their work, and provide a real-life communication interface between developers and users. There are no formalities, no papers, and no registration or participation fee, however the invited developers are encouraged to give a talk on their favorite BSD-related topic. The goal is to motivate potential future developers and users, especially undergraduate university students to work with BSD systems.

    EuroBSDCon 2010 Travel Grants

    The FreeBSD Foundation is now accepting travel grant applications for EuroBSDCon 2010 (Karlsruhe, Germany from October 8-10′. More details: EuroBSDCon 2010 Travel Grants.

    For those interested in open source firewalls, there will be a pfSense tuturial at EuroBSDCon 2010.

    pfSense is a free, open source customized distribution of FreeBSD tailored for use as a firewall and router. In addition to being a powerful, flexible firewalling and routing platform, it includes a long list of related features and a package system allowing further expandability without adding bloat and potential security vulnerabilities to the base distribution.

    MeetBSD 2010 (California)

    Registration is now open for MeetBSD 2010 (Mountain View, California, 5-6 November): www.meetbsd.com

    NYCBUG presentation

    Ivan Ivanov presented “Examples in Cryptography with OpenSSL”. Download/listen the MP3.

    Usenix Security Symposium 2010 (Capsicum)

    Robert Watson will present Capsicum (coming in FreeBSD 9.0) at Usenix Security Symposium.

    Capsicum is a lightweight operating system capability and sandbox framework planned for inclusion in FreeBSD 9. Capsicum extends, rather than replaces, UNIX APIs, providing new kernel primitives (sandboxed capability mode and capabilities) and a userspace sandbox API. These tools support compartmentalisation of monolithic UNIX applications into logical applications, an increasingly common goal supported poorly by discretionary and mandatory access control. We demonstrate our approach by adapting core FreeBSD utilities and Google’s Chromium web browser to use Capsicum primitives, and compare the complexity and robustness of Capsicum with other sandboxing techniques.

    These and other conferences can be found on my FreeBSD Events and Conferences Calandar.

    NYCBSDCon 2010 – Call for Papers

    The New York City BSD Conference (NYCBSDCon) is the main technical conference on the US East Coast for the BSD community to get together to share and gain knowledge, to network with like-minded people, and to have fun. This event is organized by members of the New York City *BSD Users Group (NYC*BUG).

    This bi-annual event will be held at Manhattan’s prestigious Cooper Union on November 12-14, 2010.

    The NYCBSDCon program committee is now accepting submissions presentations surrounding the BSD operating systems. The committee is looking to attract a wide range of speakers and attendees.

    Each talk is expected to be 45-50 minutes, including a few minutes for questions and answers. All presentations will be recorded for audio and video. Presenters will have audio/visual and network connectivity.

    Check the Schedule and Presentations:  New York City BSD Conference 2010

    FreeBSD quick news and links (08/07/2010)

    I Running old binaries on -current

    Did you know you can old FreeBSD binaries on recent versions? As strange as it may sound, all FreeBSD versions have an ABI compatibility with previous versions, and you can run files compiled years ago. However, there seems to be a little problem now with running 1.0 packages on Current (9.0). Should be fixed soon. (via)

    II Benchmarks of FreeBSD 8.1 RC2 against FreeBSD 8.0, Ubuntu Linux 10.10

    Phoronix has tested the above three operating systems and compared them. It’s maybe like comparing apples with pears, but nonetheless interesting benchmarks: Benchmarks Of FreeBSD 8.1 RC2 Against FreeBSD 8.0, Ubuntu Linux

    FreeBSD 8.1 is slated to be released this month as the first significant update to FreeBSD since the rollout of the 8.0 release last November. With the second release candidate of FreeBSD 8.1 having just been made available a few days back, we have conducted a set of tests comparing the performance of FreeBSD 8.1 RC2 versus FreeBSD 8.0 and an Ubuntu 10.10 development snapshot.FreeBSD 8.1 is slated to be released this month as the first significant update to FreeBSD since the rollout of the 8.0 release last November. With the second release candidate of FreeBSD 8.1 having just been made available a few days back, we have conducted a set of tests comparing the performance of FreeBSD 8.1 RC2 versus FreeBSD 8.0 and an Ubuntu 10.10 development snapshot.

    III MeetBSD 2010 Poland Pictures

    The MeetBSD 2010 conference (Kracow, 2-3 July) has finished. You can read the presentation summaries and view the photos (day 1 and day 2)

    IV Something More Revelant then bsdstats.org

    Generally bsdstats.org is only known by BSD users (and definitely not by all of them), so even having BIG stats out there is more or less pointless.

    But there is other way to ‘impress’ other people with BSD stats … http://distrowatch.com portal. It mainly focuses on Linux distributions but it also gathers stats for BSDs and OpenSolaris/Solaris ‘distributions’.

    How to do this: Something More Revelant then BSDSTATS.org

    V WarBSD

    I came across warBSD the other day. Has anybody ever used it and if so, what is your experience. Please share in the comments below.

    WarBSD was an attempt at using FreeBSD with the PicoBSD build scripts to make a *BSD based war driving kit.

    Serve an anonymous shell via Tor

    “While most people use Tor simply for anonymous web browsing, Tor also provides a slick way to host a service (web site, IRC chat server, etc) called a Hidden Service. These services are “hidden” because they are only accessible via the Tor network, and are under the same anonymity umbrella as Tor clients — unless they accidentally expose information about themselves, it is essentially impossible to determine the source location of the service.” continues

    KDE 4.4.5 in ports

    As of 29/06 KDE 4.4.5 is available in the FreeBSD ports directory. KDE 4.4.5 announcement

    iXsystems hosts MeetBSD California 2010

    Open source server and storage solution provider iXsystems will once again host MeetBSD California. This year, MeetBSD will be an informal 2-Day BSD Camp taking place at Hacker Dojo in Mountain View, California on November 5th and 6th.

    MeetBSD California promises to be a fun and engaging plunge into the BSD operating system world, just as it was back in 2008 when the event first took place. Allen Gunn, Executive Director of Aspiration, will facilitate this year’s “unconference”, which will consist of Break Out Sessions, Informal Discussions, and 5-10 minute “Lightning Talks” on a variety of open source development topics, including ZFS, HAST, jails, OS virtualization, and sysinstall.

    MeetBSD California 2010 will culminate with an after-party taking place at Hacker Dojo on the evening of Saturday, November 6th.

    Whether you’re interested in learning more about the BSD family of operating systems, or ready to share some of your FreeBSD wisdom, MeetBSD California 2010 will offer an enjoyable forum for lively discussion on a wide range of BSD-related topics.

    source

    Minimizing downtime using NanoBSD, ZFS and jails

    With more and more services and applications running on your average server, upgrading the operating system and application software becomes trickier and larger service windows are needed performing these upgrades.

    Over the last four years Paul Schenkeveld (PSconsult) has searched for means and methods to keep software up to date with minimum downtime and inconvenience for users and maximum consistency. The result is a model which combines the strength of NanoBSD, ZFS and jails to build servers where application upgrades result in downtime of only a few seconds and kernel upgrades only need the time to reboot without installing in (tampering with) the running system. This system is in production now for several months on 6 to 8 servers at four different sites.

    LWN.net has an article explaining Paul’s approach:

    On May 6, NLUUG held its Spring Conference with the theme System Administration. There were a lot of talks about very specific tools or case studies, but one struck your author because it married conceptual simplicity with a useful goal: Minimizing service windows on servers using NanoBSD + ZFS + jails by Paul Schenkeveld. Over the last four years, Paul has searched for methods to upgrade applications on a server with minimal downtime. The system he implemented is in production now on various servers, which require only a few seconds downtime for an application upgrade and the same amount of time for a rollback if the upgrade fails.

    [...]

    Combining these three technologies (NanoBSD, ZFS, and jails), Paul reached his goal of setting up a FreeBSD server that can be upgraded with minimal downtime. All user-visible applications run in jails. Underneath the jails, a minimal FreeBSD operating system runs, built using the NanoBSD script. This holds the kernel, some low-level services, and the tools for building a new system image for upgrading the operating system. The NanoBSD system image can be put on a partition of a regular disk drive, but Paul prefers to put it on a separate flash drive, because NanoBSD is specifically designed for it and using a separate drive for the operating system makes it easier for the system administrator when the hard drives with the jails fail.

    Read the whole article:
    NLUUG: Minimizing downtime on servers using NanoBSD, ZFS, and jails

    Paul presented the above also in Tokio at AsiaBSDCon 2010:


    Minimizing service windows on servers using NanoBSD + ZFS + jails


    Paul Schenkeveld: Minimizing service windows on servers using NanoBSD + ZFS + jails

    AsiaBSDCon 2010 paper session.

    Abstract:

    With more and more services and applications running on your average server, upgrading the operating system and application software becomes trickier and larger service windows are needed performing these upgrades.

    Over the last four years the author has searched for means and methods to keep software up to date with minimum downtime and inconvenience for users and maximum consistency. The result is a model which combines the strength of NanoBSD, ZFS and jails to build servers where application upgrades result in downtime of only a few seconds and kernel upgrades only need the time to reboot without installing in (tampering with) the running system. This system is in production now for several months on about 10 servers at five different sites.