Miscelaneous FreeBSD news and links (week 32)

1. FreeBSD East Coast Mirror

Yesterday we posted the FreeBSD Foundation’s turns to NYI press release, Steven Kreuzer who was directly involved in the project has put more details on his website:

Pretty much since the time that The NYC BSD Users Group was formed, The NY Internet Company have donated a full cabinet and a 10 Mb internet connection to NYCBUG. We used that space to host our website and mailing lists, hardware for developers and mirrors for all the major BSD projects.

In October of 2009, I received an email inviting me to a grand opening party at NYI’s new state of the art data center located in Bridgewater, NJ. I asked some folks on core@ if they thought it would be worthwhile to approach NYI to see if they would be willing to donate a few cabinets so we could build out a FreeBSD mirror on the east coast. gnnjhb and I had a very informal meeting with Phil from NYI and after asking him if they would be willing to provide us with a few cabinets, some power and bandwidth, without thought or hesitation he said yes. The possibility of putting a mirror of FreeBSD.org on the east coast quickly became possible.

Continues: East Coast FreeBSD Mirror

2. FreeBSD VirtualBox Image for Port Maintainers

This website provides 64bit VirtualBox Images for FreeBSD Port Maintainers with some common used software pre-installed.

3. 10 Differences between Linux and BSD

  • Licenses
  • Control
  • Kernel vs operating system
  • UNIX/like
  • Base systems
  • More from source
  • Upgrades
  • Bleeding edge
  • Hardware support
  • User base

Full post: 10 differences between Linux and BSD (techrepublic.com)

4. Open Source projects that changed the world

FreeBSD is one of them: Open source projects that changed the world (ostatic.com)

5. BSDCan through the years

Kirk Russell has posted a summary of BSDCan through the years on the Google Open Source Blog.

I’m Kirk Russell, a Google Site Reliability Engineer who moves files around the cloud at a massive scale. I use BSD software on a daily basis — in my Android phone, my home NAS and my MacBook. My newest toy is a small ARM board that runs FreeBSD.

Earlier this year I attended BSDCan, a software conference for BSD based operating systemprojects. I attended this conference to learn about new BSD technology that will someday become part of my daily life and to meet people with similar interests — there is time to chat in-between the scheduled talks and in the pub. BSDCan is a conference where I learn about new development that I can put to use both at work and at home. Learning these things from the original developers makes it that much more interesting.

Here is a quick reflection on some highlights of past conferences:

BSDCan through the years

(Free)BSD quick news and links (week 16)

Welcome to the (Free)BSD leftovers for week 6. In this post we have a mix of news snippets, quick links, howto’s, links ’n software/package updates. Just a round up of those little things I saved up this week. Previous weeks’ roundups can be found here.

FreeBSD News

  1. FreeBSD & Google Summer of Code 2010
    FreeBSD Project is participating in Google’s Summer of Code programme for a sixth year. Undergraduate and graduate students are invited to apply for a grant to spend the summer improving the FreeBSD operating system! More information available on the FreeBSD Summer of code page.
    Students may now apply to participate at http://socghop.appspot.com/. Before applying you may wish to discuss your project ideas on the freebsd-hackers mailing list or on the #freebsd-soc IRC channel on EFNet. Project ideas can be found at: http://www.freebsd.org/projects/summerofcode.html
  2. Have you ever expressed your gratitude to a FreeBSD developer?
    You like FreeBSD and/or operating systems based on it, but have you have ever dropped that developer that maintains/implemented the feature that’s so important to you a note, saying “thank you”?
    Brandon Gooch, a system administrator at Southeastern Oklahoma State University, recently wrote the FreeBSD Foundation to express his gratitude towards FreeBSD developers in general and the recent wireless work in particular.


FreeBSD 9 developments (via):

  1. UFS journalling committed
    Jeff Roberson has committed soft-updates journalling to 9-CURRENT. It enables a small file system journal which works in combination with soft-updates to eliminate boot fsck’s. It is different from most other implementations of file system journalling in that it doesn’t journal raw blocks but sort of meta-data about meta-data
  2. GEOM disk IO scheduler framework
    A GEOM IO scheduler framework has been committed! The framework allows for multiple IO schedulers to be installed on top of GEOM providers (usually disk drives). As a consequence, potentially different schedulers can be installed on different drives. The work was done by Luigi Rizzo and Fabio Checconi.
  3. FreeBSD PowerPC 9.0 snapshot available (for testing)


FreeBSD Ports

  1. Can the current Ports directory and building of it be improved?
    “There has been some discussion lately about if and how to “revamp” the ports system to make it more usable by general users. (…) Unfortunately there has been very little feedback from users themselves – which is probably a mistake, but also – there was very little feedback from the population (not a particularily small one) that is the cross-section of users and developers. Some ideas were presented, but at the end it all started revolving around banding the gaps and smaller improvements that will, I think, be practically invisible to the end-users.”
    Ivan Voras has noted down his ideas in this post: of ports and of men.


Releases

  1. m0n0wall
    m0n0wall 1.32 is out, and it finally fixes the annoying Ethernet link state bug on ALIX boards (and others that use VIA network chips). Some more work has been done on IPv6 support, the DNS forwarder and the hardware monitor.
  2. NanoBSD
    NanoBSD on ALIX in iX 05/2010. This article  ago will appear on page 146 of ix magazine (DE) issue 05/2010


Websites / Social Media

  1. PC-BSD
    As far as i’m aware this page is not officially supported by PC-BSD  / iXsystems, but there is a Facebook PC-BSD page. There’s already quite a popular and active Facebook PC-BSD Group.
  2. iXsystems website
    As of this week iXsystems has a new website. I like the new version as it’s a lot cleaner and makes finding the right server easier. iXsystems is the corporate sponsor behind PC-BSD and FreeNAS.


Guides & Howto’s

  1. Setting up a headless torrent daemon in FreeBSD
    “I have FreeBSD running as a home server for a while now. One of the things I wanted the server to take care of is downloading torrents, so I could shut down my PC whenever I am downloading stuff. With transmission-daemon (net-p2p/transmission-daemon from ports) this is really simple.”  (tweakblogs.net)
  2. Run FreeNAS in Windows for Network Serving and Sharing
    Many of the popular servers are open source and usually are more widely supported for Linux and other Unix-like systems. However, most can be run right inside Windows. This is especially great for temporary solutions or for new or amateur administrators (serverwatch.com)


(Free)BSD Events

  1. Solution Linux 2010
    Last month   “Solutions Linux” took place in Paris, one of the major professional open source events in France. Here are some pictures of the BSD booths : http://www.bebik.net/cgi-bin/album.pl?album=2010SL
  2. A new BSDA Certification session will be held in Nantes, France on 1 June 2010 at BSDay Nantes. Check the BSD Certification calendar for events near you.
  3. BSD Professional Certification Exam Update
    A short progress report on what’s happening with the BSD


New FreeBSD Committers

Over the last few weeks a few more people have been given commit rights. It’s always good to see more people join the FreeBSD project.

  1. Ports
  • Sahil Tandon
  • Rene Ladan
  • Giuseppe Pilichi
  • Bernhard Fröhlich
  1. Source Code
  • Randi Harper
  • Ryan Stone
  • Ana Kukec


BSD / Unix Family News

  1. DragonFly BSD 2.6: towards a free clustering operating system
    This article gives in introduction into the background and history of DragonFlyBSD, its HAMMER filesystem, new features etc
    “The ultimate goal of DragonFly BSD is to allow programs to run across multiple machines as if they are running on one system. The operating system is still far from that goal, but Dillon has done a great deal of rewriting in nearly every subsystem of the kernel to lay the foundations for future work. Much of the rationale behind the design goals is explained on the project’s web site. It’s an interesting read, because it shows how they want to tackle an ambitious vision with a realistic plan…” continues (lwn.net)
  2. DragonFly BSD 2.6.1 with new swapcache released
    DragonFly BSD, the FreeBSD fork, has been updated to version 2.6.1 and incorporates a added a number of new features whilst updating the components of the clustering oriented operating system. A new swapcache has been incorporated which allows the swap space to also retain clean filesystem data and meta-data rather than just memory. (more)
  3. Why OpenBSD’s Release Process Works
    “Twelve years ago OpenBSD developers started engineering a release process that has resulted in quality software being delivered on a consistent 6 month schedule — 25 times in a row, exactly on the date promised, and with no critical bugs. This on-time delivery process is very different from how corporations manage their product releases and much more in tune with how volunteer driven communities are supposed to function. Theo de Raadt explains in this presentation how the OpenBSD release process is managed (video) and why it has been such a success”  (via)

  4. AIX 7.1 is coming
    IBM plans to deliver the next version of the AIX® operating system, AIX 7, and new releases of PowerVM™ and PowerHA SystemMirror for AIX. These new offerings are designed to help companies reduce cost, improve service and lower the risk of deploying and migrating applications to AIX on Power® Systems.The new capabilities planned for AIX 7 are designed to expand the scalability, reliability and manageability of AIX and the applications running on AIX. Key features will provide greater vertical scalability of up to 1024 threads or 256 cores in a single partition, a clustering infrastructure designed to provide highly availability applications with PowerHA SystemMirror and to simplify management of scale-out workloads. Additional AIX 7 will include new management capabilities based on IBM Systems Director that are designed to simplify the management of AIX system configuration. Finally AIX 7 will support the ability to run AIX 5.2 inside of a Workload Partition to allow consolidation of old workloads on new systems (source & more)
  5. IBM Prunes Low-Cost AIX Rev
    IBM has radically improved the bang for the buck on its Power7-based Power Systems 701 and 702 blade servers this week, and is expected to soon deliver similarly priced entry rack and tower servers. And now it has a new, lower-cost AIX 6.1 Express Edition that will match the less expensive hardware and therefore help Big Blue’s AIX platform better compete against Windows, Linux, HP-UX, and Solaris alternatives. The new AIX Express Edition takes the special low-cost pricing that was available only on JS series blade servers and now makes it available across the Power Systems line, including logical partitions on the largest Power 595 (and before too long Power 595) servers.

Quick news and links

Security Advisories

The FreeBSD Security issued 3 security advisories

FreeBSD Errata Notice

Since FreeBSD 8.0 was released, several stability and performance problems have been identified. This Errata Notice describes several fixes judged to be of particular importance, but low risk, to users with specific workloads or using specific features that trigger these problems.

Areas where problems are addressed include NFS, ZFS, Multicast networking, SCTP as well as the rename(2) syscall.

Continues

Adopt a FreeBSD Port

There are currently 4726 ports without maintainer, which means that no one is actively maintaining them. Out of these ports, 243 (roughly 5.00%) are out of date. Can you help?

Android SDK

Android SDK on FreeBSD is now available for FreeBSD 8

ZFS Patches on FreeBSD 7

Alexander has made a lot of ZFS patches for FreeBSD 7

FreeBSD Snapshots

The first batch of FreeBSD snapshot releases for 2010 are now available:  ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/snapshots/201001

PBI Builder 2.5

A newer version of the PC-BSD PBI Builder (package builder) has been released

FreeBSD link roundup – 28/04/09

FreeBSD

FreeBSD Logo1) Martin Wilke is looking for people to test QT 4.5.1. He also reports he managed to get Firefox 3.1 Beta4 working on FreeBSD. Please test.

2) Ivan Voras has done some virtualised benchmarking of

  • Ubuntu 8.10,
  • FreeBSD 7.1 and
  • Windows Server 2008 R2 beta

on the three currently most prominent virtualisation platforms:

  • VMWare ESX 3.5 U3,
  • Citrix XenServer 5.0 U2,
  • Microsoft Hyper-V 2008 R2

The results are mostly better then I thought they will be. Especially suprising was FreeBSD’s more than decent performance which actually lead the others in one benchmark…”

… The results show that a wholly-virtualized FreeBSD machine under ESXi was consistently almost as fast as the para-virtualized Xen Linux.


pfSense

pfSense logoAbout a month ago, the pfSense developers gave a sneak preview of the new pfSense dashboard theme. Following feedback and comments, Holger Bauer has now designed a new theme:

Well, after there was not too much love for my last theme I tried to do something more masscompatible this time trying to take all the critics in consideration that I earned so far:

  • less colorful, stick with the original pfSense-colors (grey/red)
  • don’t waste too much space for the header/footer
  • kind of corporate look
  • static menu, that doesn’t scroll away (I guess that at least was
  • something everybody liked about the hackathon theme)
  • more lightweight on graphics
  • So here is what I came up with so far. This is still in the making so (like always) your feedback is appreciated and might influence the final result.

New design here

 

BSD CertificationBSD Certification

Dru Lavigne has an update on the BSDA Exam

The BSD Associate Exam is now over a year old! Here are some interesting
atats so far:

  • 12 Events in all of 2008; 14 events in just the first half of 2009 
  • Over 1000 people have registered for a BSDCG ID (needed to register for an exam)
  • The exam has been held in US, Brazil, Canada, Germany, Japan, France, Denmark, Ukraine, Netherlands, Argentina, and the UK
  • So far, 66 people have passed the BSDA exam and received their certificates
  • Read further

(Free)BSD links round up (week 8)

Welcome to the (Free)BSD leftovers for week 8. In this post we have a mix of news snippets, links, howto’s  ’n software/package update. Just a roundup of those little things I saved up throughout the week. Previous roundups can be found here.

 

(Free)BSD News

  1. Desktop NetBSD Project
    An interesting discussion was started by Andrew Doran on the NetBSD mailing list regarding the ease of install of a “modern” desktop for users.The primary goal for the Desktop NetBSD project is:
      

    Given a NetBSD CD and a reasonably modern x86 computer, make it possible to install a useful desktop system in under 15 minutes, responding to only a few prompts in the process. 

    Announcement |  Project website

     

     

  2. New FreeBSD USB2/ USB4BSD  Stack

    “We are in the final stages of bringing in the new usb stack. Features include: SMP, better device support, speed increases.We hope to make it in for 8.0. It will really take a unified effort to make this all work and I look forward to all contributors input.

    We have a few large steps ahead of us and I wanted to lay out the schedule so that people understand what is coming and what to expect.

    At this point we expect there to be no style or changes in usb2 that are not bugfixes until Phase 3 “Hand off”. The reason for this is to prevent bugs from creeping in and allow the maintainer to focus 100% on bugs and feature parity with the oldusb stack.”

    Here is the plan and timeline

 

Releases

  1. OpenBSD turns 4.5-BETA
    Miod Vallat has tagged OpenBSD 4.5-BETA. Snapshots should be available soon for testing, check the mirrors for availability.  

    OpenBSD Project Page  |  Read the full commit message

  2. DragonFly 2.2 released
    The DragonFly 2.2 release is here! The HAMMER filesystem is considered production-ready in this release; It was first released in July 2008. The 2.2 release represents major stability improvements across the board, new drivers, much better pkgsrc support and integration, and a brand new release infrastructure with multiple target options.
    DragonFlyBSD Project Page  |  Release Announcement 

 

New FreeBSD committers
The following people have been awarded with update rights this week:

  • Andriy Gapon (Source)

 

Guides ‘n howtos

  • Stopping HTTP brute force attacks with BruteBlock & IPFW (Chris Buckley)
    Chris Buckley writes about how to stop HTTP brute force attacks using BruteBlock and ipfw.n
    Link to howto (thanks to Edmondas)
     
  • Machine backups using tarsnap (Tim Bishop)
    “I’ve got a dedicated server that I’ve been backing up for the past few years. My crude backup system involved taring everything to local disk and then rsyncing it to a remote server. It worked well at first, but as the amount of data grew it was taking half a day to run. Add to that the amount of disk space being used by the local copy and I had to find a better solution…..”
    Link to howto (thanks to Kevin


(Free)BSD links round up (week 6)

Week 6 round up: Welcome to the (Free)BSD leftovers for week 6. In this post we have a mix of news snippets, quick links, howto’s, links ’n software/package updates. Just a round up of those little things I saved up this week. Previous weeks’ roundups can be found here.

(Free)BSD News

  1. New Sidekick Will Run NetBSD, Not Windows CE
    Many sites are reporting that the next Sidekick LX 2009/Blade, from Danger (acquired by Microsoft early in 2008), is going to run NetBSD as their operating system, causing Microsoft’s recruiters to look for NetBSD developers
    “After Danger was bought by Microsoft in 2008, one would expect that their upcoming models will run Microsoft’s embedded operating system Windows CE as operating system. Apparrently that’s not the case, and the new Sidekick will rather run NetBSD as operating system. It seems Danger did too much work that they didn’t want to throw away.”  More…

(Free)BSD Releases

  1. NetBSD 5.0 RC1 released
    The announcement says: “On behalf of the NetBSD Release Engineering team, I am proud to announce that the first release candidate of NetBSD 5.0 is now available for download” More…
    Hubert F’s NetBSD Blog says: “Probably the two most significant improvements in NetBSD 5.0 will be journalling for UFS  and the move from XFree to X.org. Download now, or have a look at the changes in 5.0

 

 

New FreeBSD committers
The following people have been awarded  with update rights this week:

  • Beat Gätzi (ports)

Guides ‘n howtos

  • Notes on Installing Sguil Using FreeBSD 7.1 Packages  (Richard Bejtlich)
    “It’s been a while since I’ve looked at the Sguil ports for FreeBSD, so I decided to see how they work. In this post I will talk about installing a Sguil sensor and server on a single FreeBSD 7.1 test VM using packages shipped with FreeBSD 7.1.”
    Sguil: The Analyst Console for Network Security Monitoring – sguil.net
    Link to howto: taosecurity.blogspot.com
  • Upgrading FreeBSD Packages   (Richard Bejtlich)
    In my last post I discussed upgrading from FreeBSD 7.0 to 7.1. In this post I’ll mention packages that needed to be updated.
    In the last post I showed two installed packages using the native pkg_info command. … I decided to use Portupgrade to update packages installed on the system. Portupgrade was not on the box so I added it via pkg_add. I used the -n switch to do a “dry run” to see what version would be added.
    Link to howto: taosecurity.blogspot.com

Ports ‘n Packages
The following interesting and useful programs are now availble as (updated) ports or packages:

  • N/A

FreeBSD howto links (week 29)

FreeBSD howto and installation tips

FreeBSD howtos and installation tips

Here are some links to FreeBSD howto articles published this week. This may be of interest to those who don’t mind “getting their hands dirty”.

Building a router with pfSense (video)

Do you have extra computers lying around the house? In this episode, Matt shows us how to convert an old computer into a home network router.

Link (wideopenmind.com)

Installing A FreeBSD 7.0 DNS Server With BIND

This tutorial shows how to set up a FreeBSD based server that offers DNS services. This tutorial is written for the 64-bit version of FreeBSD, but should apply to the 32-bit version.

I want to say first that this is not the only way of setting up such a system. There are many ways of achieving this goal but this is the way I take. I do not issue any guarantee that this will work for you!

Link (howtoforge.com)

How To Patch / Upgrade BIND 9.x Under FreeBSD Operating System

BIND 9 is part of core FreeBSD 7.x. How do I apply BIND 9 security patch under FreeBSD 7.x? Do I need to fetch entire source (buildworld) to patch BIND 9? How do I patch up recent BIND 9 DNS cache poisoning bug?

Link (www.cyberciti.biz)

FreeBSD Install Logwatch Tool For Log Analysis and Monitoring

How do I watch, monitor system log under FreeBSD systems and generate summery of critical UNIX log files via email?

Link (cyberciti.biz)

FreeBSD Install and Configure Webmin Web-based Interface ( Control Panel )

Q. How do I install webmin control panel for my FreeBSD server?

Link (cyberziti.biz)

ezjail – A jail administration framework

I want to set up some jails. They will each be very similar. They will each be used to test a slightly different configuration of Bacula. My tool of choice is ezjail, available in the ports tree.

With ezjail, I can:

  • create a jail flavour, upon which the creation of other jails can be based
  • centrally update the jail’s ports tree

Link (freebsddiary.org)

FreeBSD News – quick links (week 27)

These are a few links to FreeBSD howtos published this week that may be of interest to those who don’t mind “getting their hands dirty”.

Managing jails

This document is an introduction to basic FreeBSD jails also called ‘fat jails’. We discuss an easy jail installation process. We will do some basic jail configuration and show you how to manage the jail environment. This document wil not cover building ‘chroot jails’ in a jail.

Link

Step by step install WordPress Multi Users (WPMU) in FreeBSD

A client need to install wordpress multi user to teach their employee about blog. They want it installed in their server, running FreeBSD 7 stable.

Here’s a step by step to install wpmu in FreeBSD, might be useful for someone

Link

How FreeBSD makes vulnerability auditing easy: portaudit

There are a number of things I like about FreeBSD, more than any Linux distribution I’ve ever used. Some of those are advantages shared by no Linux distribution I’ve used, and some are advantages shared by a few Linux distributions but not others — but no Linux distribution shares all of these advantages (even discounting things no Linux distribution has, like a BSD-licensed kernel).

Link