FreeBSD Events Update (vendor summit, KyivBSD, SFD, netmap video)

I have linked to a couple of past and upcoming FreeBSD events that are worth sharing.

 

1. FreeBSD vendor summit (3-4 November)

I wasn’t aware of any FreeBSD vendor event, but there’s one from 3-4 November 2011 in Sunnyvale, California.

This is an opportunity for developers and vendors to share project direction and goals, collaborate on various projects.

If you’re a vendor using FreeBSD, or you’re a vendor thinking about using FreeBSD in a project (wireless or otherwise) this mini-conference is just for you.

(via Adrian Chadd’s blog)

2. KyivBSD 2011 (24 September)

KyivBSD will be held on 24 September 2001 at the University of Taras Shevchenko, Kiev, Ukraine. Registration for the free KyivBSD event is now open.

3. Participate in Software Freedom Day (17 September)

FreeBSD is taking part in the Software Freedom Day (SFD), as announced on the FreeBSD Foundation Blog:

“Software Freedom Day (SFD) is an annual global event that encourages open source software users to reach out to their local community to educate others about the benefits of using open source.

Frederic Muller, President of SFI, the non-profit organization behind Software Freedom Day, has been very helpful in encouraging FreeBSD users to participate in SFD. FreeBSD is listed as a partner on the SFD website. In addition, the FreeBSD logo is included on the cover letter and a copy of PC-BSD was included with the 210 packages that were shipped to the pre-registered teams. He also added the FreeBSD news RSS feed to planet SFD so that other SFD participants will get FreeBSD updates.” Continues

4. Presentation by Luigi Rizzo on Netmap on Google Tech Talks Channel

Luigi Rizza, a FreeBSD developer, presented on Google Tech Talks.

“Software packet processing at line rate is problematic both in userspace and within the kernel, due to the cost of managing in-kernel metadata, and system calls/and data copy overhead.”

Video: Netmap: A Novel Framework for High Speed Packet I/O

Check out the Youtube BSD Conferences channel for more FreeBSD related videos.

5. Two interviews with the FreeBSD Core Team members (Russian).

Igor Savchuk has conducted some interviews with Andrei Chernov and Konstantin Belousov:

The conversation is in Russian, but with Google Translate you’ll get the gist of the conversation.

FreeBSD Foundation Newsletter – August 2011

In the latest edition of the semi annual FreeBSD Foundation newsletter you can read about:

Good to see how the Foundation spends received donations on some promising projects.

Read the full newsletter here: FreeBSD Foundation Newsletter – August 2011

FreeNAS videos, FreeBSD on Amazon EC2 and Intel GPU FreeBSD driver update

Three noteworthy links today to FreeBSD related news:

I. FreeBSD on Amazon’s EC2

Colin Percifal mentioned on his blog that he managed to successfully run FreeBSD on Amazon’s EC2 via defenestration, tricking EC2 to think Windows is running.

How can we trick EC2? Take advantage of the fact that Elastic Block Store disks can be detached from EC2 instances and reattached to different instances, and replace the boot disk of a “Windows” instance with a disk containing FreeBSD. In other words, defenestrate the EC2 instance. (Note to pedants: While “defenestrate” usually means “to throw out of a window”, etymologically it could equally mean “to throw windows out” — and the Oxford English Dictionary does show a recorded use in this sense dating from 1927.)

II. Intel GPU FreeBSD Kernel Driver project update

The FreeBSD Foundation announced on 16 Feb that it had awarded Konstantin Belousov a grant to implement support of GEM, KMS, and DRI for Intel Drivers.

The project is to implement GEM, port KMS, and write new DRI drivers for Intel Graphics, including the latest Sandy Bridge generation of integrated graphic units. The work should allow the latest Intel open-source driver to run on FreeBSD, expanding the range of hardware where FreeBSD is suitable for the desktop.

Kostik has now uploaded (part of) his code for review, comments and feedback: Intel GPU Kernel Driver:

I created the first code drop for the ongoing GEM/KMS project. Please note that this is not an end-user release, and even _not_ a call for testing. The project is not finished yet, and I expect quite more efforts from me even after the scheduled project end, and from ports/x11 people, before the driver and usermode infrastructure will be ready for the general public consumption.

That said, the patch is only of use for you now if you want to review, debug or otherwise help the project. The driver is known to be unstable, some parts are missing, some (esp. VM changes) are under the discussion and propably will be changed.

III. FreeNAS 8 videos

iXsystems has done a great job rewriting FreeNAS and making a great enterprise ready NAS system, but it is also providing good documentation and videos showing stp-by-step how different FreeNAS features can be set up and used.

Install FreeNAS 8 in VMWare
Learn how to work through a basic installation of FreeNAS 8, with the added bonus of VMWare specific options.

System Configuration Overview
A brief look at how to configure the basic systems settings under FreeNAS 8, and a quick look at some of the more popular and helpful options to enable

Volumes Overview
After configuring your system, setting up your volumes is an important next step towards sharing files and using FreeNAS in any environment

Shares Overview
Learn to set up shares on your FreeNAS installation in order to enable access for users on different systems and protocols.

Network Configuration Overview
A brief overview of FreeNAS 8′s Network Configuration options, and a look at what each of the options means.

Active Directory Overview
A very quick look at how to get started with active directory under FreeNAS 8, and an overview of the options

You can watch the videos over at http://www.freenas.org/community/resources/videos

libcxxrt C++ runtime available under BSD License

The FreeBSD Foundation and the NetBSD Foundation announced that they have acquired a non-exclusive copyright license to the libcxxrt C++ runtime software from PathScale, a leader in high performance Fortran, C and C++ compiler products for AMD64, Intel64 and MIPS.

Check out the press release for the details: libcxxrt C++ runtime available under BSD License

Upcoming FreeBSD Events: BSDCan, GSoC 2011

As most of you will be aware, BSDCan is one of the major annual BSD conferences, and Google sponsors development of the 5 big BSD’s each year in the Summer of Code. More info with regards to these events below.

BSDCan 2011

BSD Talk has a 15 minutes interview with Dan Langille, the organiser of BSDCan 2011, wherein they chat about the upcoming BSDCan conference: BSDTalk 203 – BSDCan and PGCon with Dan Langille

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please fill out and submit the (PDF) Travel Grant Request Application by April 15, 2011 to apply for this grant.

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates. Read further

Google Summer of Code 2011

Google Announces Summer of Code Accepted Projects
Google has announced the accepted projects list for its 2011 Google Summer of Code (GSOC) Program. Accepted Projects can be viewed on this page. FreeBSD is among them. If you want to take part, check out the FreeBSD GSoC ideas page.

Grazer Linuxtag 2011

FH Joanneum Graz, Graz, Austria  -

The Grazer Linuxtag is a one day event (09 April 2011, FH Joanneum Graz, Graz, Austria) on Linux and free software in general. Besides a FreeBSD booth and the possibility to take the BSDA certification exam there will also be a BSD Bootcamp with live workshops covering different FreeBSD topics. More information can be found here.

 

FreeBSD Foundation requesting project proposals (2011)

The FreeBSD Foundation has requested proposals for potential funding. If you have any ideas how you can FreeBSD can be improved in 2011, why not submit you idea. In case you have no ideas but don’t mind getting paid for FreeBSD Development, have a look at the FreeBSD list of projects and ideas for volunteers.

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce we are soliciting the submission of proposals (submission document) for work relating to any of the major subsystems or infrastructure within the FreeBSD operating system. Proposals will be evaluated based on desirability, technical merit and cost-effectiveness.

FreeBSD Foundation End-of-Year Newsletter (2010)

The FreeBSD Foundation has published its annual End-of-Year Newsletter which contains examples of how they have supported and funded the FreeBSD Project and community in 2010.

Table of contents:

Full newsletter: FreeBSD Foundation end-of year newsletter (2010)

It’s not too late to make a donation to the Foundation for 2010. The Foundation thanks everyone for their support so far and any donations made.

BSD Fund has announced it is contributing $3,600 (twitter @bsdfund)

New FreeBSD Foundation Project: Feed-Forward Clock Synchronization

The FreeBSD Foundation has announced that Julien Ridoux and Darryl Veitch at the University of Melbourne have been awarded a grant to implement support of feed-forward clock synchronization algorithms.

“The Network Time Protocol (NTP) is widely used for synchronization over the network and the ntpd daemon is the current reference synchronization algorithm. The system clock in FreeBSD is currently designed with ntpd in mind, leading to strong feedback coupling between the kernel and the synchronization daemon.

The RADclock is an example of an alternative class of synchronization algorithms based on feed-forward principles. This project will provide the core support for feed-forward algorithms, so that alternatives to ntpd can be developed and tested. The central motivation for this is the strong potential of such approaches for highly robust and accurate synchronization.

Beyond this, virtualization is one of the next major challenges faced by time keeping systems. The current feedback synchronization model is complex and introduces its own dynamics, an approach that is not suited to the requirements of virtualization. Feed-forward based synchronization offers a cleaner and simpler approach, which is capable of providing accurate time keeping over live migration of virtual machines.” (source: FreeBSD Foundation Blog)

If you want to see FreeBSD prosper further in 2011, why not make a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation to help them fund more projects? Currently there are roughly 280 less donors than last year and the Foundation is still $136.000 away from the set $350.000 goal. Any donation, however small will make a difference. (I am not affiliated with the Foundation)