Setting up LAMP on FreeBSD (howto)

Referring to “LAMP” with regards to FreeBSD doesn’t make sense, but anyway, that’s how the author titled this howto “Setting up LAMP on FreeBSD“.

I’m not complaining, it’s always nice to see FreeBSD related article on Linux.com ;-)

Setting up a LAMP server is a common task for systems administrators, and FreeBSD is one of the most reliable and stable operating systems available. You can swap out the L in LAMP with F for FreeBSD to build a fast and reliable Web server.

In this article I assume FreeBSD is already installed. If not, make sure you download the latest stable production version of FreeBSD and run the installer. I recommend choosing the MINIMUM option at the installer screen to quickly install only the most basic and necessary things.

To install applications on FreeBSD, use the ports files. Ports are plain text files that know where to download source code, so that the software will be compiled on your computer. This way you can change settings (including or excluding specific modules) as you want, and the software will fit perfectly to the specifications of your computer. First, you have to make sure that the latest ports files are installed. If you’ve never installed the ports, issue portsnap fetch extract in the shell; otherwise, issue portsnap fetch update. This will download the latest ports files. After a bunch of messages that show you what files have been downloaded, you’re ready to go.

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Source: Linux.com (31/07/2008)

FreeBSD foundation newsletter – July 2008

From the July 2008 FreeBSD Foundation newsletter:

  • Letter From the Vice President
  • Fundraising Update
  • Java 1.6 available for FreeBSD 7.0 and 6.3
  • NetApp Filer donation
  • BSD Certification Project
  • Accepting Project Proposals
  • AsiaBSDCon 2008
  • BSDCan 2008
  • BSDCan Developer Summit
  • 2008 Grant and Travel Grant Recipients
  • FreeBSD Testimonial from Juniper
  • Board of Directors Update
  • Financials

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FreeBSD embedded systems

Talking about FreeBSD as an embedded operating system, did you know there are quite a few devices out there that use FreeBSD inside?

A variety of products are directly or indirectly based on FreeBSD. For instance, Juniper Networks routers (JUNOS), Ironport network security appliances (AsyncOS), Nokia’s firewall operating system (IPSO), NetApp’s OnTap GX, Panasas’s and Isilon Systems‘s cluster storage operating systems, NetASQ security appliances and St Bernard iPrism web filtering appliance.

If you’re aware of any more FreeBSD based appliances, please let us all know in the comments.