new SpreadFreeBSD.org logos

There are new logos on our SpreadFreeBSD.org website which you can use.

SpreadBSD

Did you know you can help us spread the knowledge and awareness of FreeBSD/PC-BSD by putting one of the new logos on your website, blog or emails and get a point every time somebody clicks on the link?

Bij doing this you can get (by enough points) products from iXsystems free or discounted.

Have a look at the different logos: www.spreadfreebsd.org

FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (2008 Q1)

This 2008 Q1 Status Report covers FreeBSD related projects between January and March 2008. During this time FreeBSD 7.0 was released. BSDCan is upon us with the Developer Summit starting the 14th and the Conference starting the 16th.

These are the topics of the 2008 Q1 report:

Google Summer of Code

  • finstall – Graphical installer for FreeBSD
  • Summer of Code

Projects

  • ProPolice support for FreeBSD
  • Rewriting the TTY layer
  • USB

FreeBSD Team Reports

  • FreeBSD Bugbusting Team
  • The FreeBSD Foundation
  • The Ports Collection

Kernel

  • Multi-IPv4/v6/no-IP jails
  • UnionFS Improvements

Documentation

  • Ideas Web Application
  • The Hungarian Documentation Project
  • The Spanish Documentation Project

new BSD forum: daemonforums

One of our regular blog readers brought a new BSD related forum to my attention: daemonforums.org

It’s a new website without much activity yet, but what I’m curious about is, why create yet another BSD related forum? How is this one different from BSD Forums , BSD Support or BSD Nexus etc?

It would have been nice if the creator(s) explained why they’ve started yet another forum or what niche they’re aiming at.

Personally, I think we should co-operate more, recommend and improve what’s available already in the BSD world (be it operating systems, websites or forums – unless strong and valid reasons are there, obviously). United we’re stronger.

www.daemonforums.org

Thanks to kace – gotbsd.net for reporting this.

FreeBSD News – quick links (week 17)

I News & Articles

FreeBSD for Web and E-Mail Servers

I’m not touting FreeBSD over Linux. Within the Unix-like community, and even within the Linux world, it’s easy to find heated arguments over the various versions of operating systems. It seems that no matter what software or computer system some people use, they will fight to the death to prove theirs is the best. I can only tell you that FreeBSD works well for us. For years, ComputorEdge.com ran well on a Linux box. The only reason that we didn’t continue was concerns for the age of the hardware. When we brought in new servers, we installed FreeBSD. Once Apache—the same Web server we used on the Linux computer—was installed, the movement of the site to the new machine was fairly simple.

I had to learn to use FreeBSD, but now I’ve developed a certain comfort level. I could go to a Linux computer and do many of the same things I do now, but there are just enough differences for it to feel foreign to me. I’m sure that this is true to some extent even when moving between versions of Linux.

The Linux world is taking many more steps toward making the individual user more comfortable with using it as a replacement for Windows. If I were looking to do that, then I would probably start with Linux. However, if your primary objective is to build a server—for the Web, e-mail, or another intensive application—it would be difficult to go wrong with FreeBSD. More…

pfSniffer? A non-firewall use for pfSense

Several years ago my company looked into getting Distributed Sniffer Appliances, made by Network General. These are devices that attach to an Ethernet segment (at a branch office) and allow you to remotely connect and pull traces. Ideally, we would have loved to have these in each remote location so that we could more easily troubleshoot problems that seemed to crop up regularly. They looks like very nice appliances, but Network General wanted an arm and a leg for each one, so we passed.

We recently had a need for this sort of thing and I had a great idea. Many months ago, I noticed that pfSense had added a very nifty feature called Packet Capture. Essentially, the pfSense WebGUI has an interface to tcpdump, allowing you to put in some simple filter criteria (source/destination IP Address) and have a trace executed on a particular interface. This is a really nice feature for troubleshooting your firewall, but I thought that this could be used to make a distributed “pfSniffer”. More…

II Releases

New PC-BSD PBI Builder released

The PBI builder is a powerful command-line script system, which can be used to convert a FreeBSD port into a PBI file. The configuration for this process is stored as a module, which can then be used to rebuild the PBI automatically. Developers can then submit these finished modules to PC-BSD Software, where they will be added to a build server, which rebuilds the PBI every time the underlying port is updated. More…

Portscout Services Started!

Time to make my Portscout public for all.

What is Portscout? Portscout is a tool which looks for new versions of software in the
FreeBSD ports tree and potentially other software repositories. More…

III Howto

SpamAssassin Installed in 10 minutes.

In our example we are going to install SpamAssassin from the ports. This example is suitable for a small company with up to few dozen of mailboxes. More…