Flash 9 for FreeBSD 7.1 (howto)

Flash 9 for FreeBSD at last! And I don’t mean having to run a Windows or Linux browser — Flash 9 in native Firefox 3. FreeBSD’s linux emulation layer has undergone some upgrades recently, and as of FreeBSD 7.1 it is able to provide enough kernel support to get the linux Flash player version 9 running. Very good indeed, and hopefully it’ll hold us out until Adobe create official native FreeBSD support (assuming that rumour comes true). Note: this only works on i386 and AMD64 platforms.

Instructions here (crnl.org/blog, 01/11/2008)

BTW PC-BSD 7.0.1 comes with Flash 9 pre-installed

Many thanks Aragon for letting me know.

No cost FreeBSD shell accounts online

Having an online *BSD shell account is great for experimenting with BSD, network debugging or testing environments. There is a number of shell providers available for different flavours of BSD.

If you want to sign up with any do some research with regards to available RAM, speed of the machine, type of processor and server connection speed.

HP Testdrive seems to be one of the better ones, if not the best. If offers plenty of choice with regards to operating systems, have massive servers with plenty of RAM and fast processors.

BSD Talk has a short introduction on free online shells (BSD Talk 8) and a couple of links to providers.

I’d also like to mention the MTV Europe shell project. Though online only part-time and not free for FreeBSD (yet) it comes with a few extras.

I got one server with FreeBSD installed, which is available for access during weekends. If more than 20 people will subscribe I can keep it running 24/7.

FreeBSD Summer of Code finished – update

Murray Stockely reports about the success rate for Summer of Code students working on FreeBSD. 19 out of 21 students successfully completed the program this summer.  He has created a summary of all 19 individual projects. On the Google Open Source Blog he wrote a post to showcase some student projects from our fourth successful summer of code:

FreeBSD has participated as a mentoring organization in the Google Summer of Code™ each year since 2005. This year, FreeBSD mentored 21 students with a final success rate of 91%. Robert Watson and I have written a detailed summary of the FreeBSD 2008 Summer of Code experience. With the help of our mentors we’ve selected three successful projects to showcase here:

The summer has ended but many students are continuing to work on their projects.

Why FreeBSD is my favorite *nix OS (Scott Spear)

Scott Spear has created a nice summary with the reasons why he loves FreeBSD

Installation

FreeBSD provides a very easy installation process; it uses Sysinstall as an automated installation package to do it for you. All you have to do is answer some questions to create users and tell it which software to install and you are on your way to being up and running in a matter of minutes…. continued

Security

FreeBSD is one of the most secure operating systems available. There are a number of security features built into the system that deal with user and file system security. There are also a number of applications compatible with FreeBSD that offer added security beyond the default features….. continued

Compatibility

There are numerous hardware compatibilities listed on the hardware notice for each release of FreeBSD. It is compatible with all the major processors the most popular being Intel and AMD….. continued

Ports

The port system is a collection of software that is packaged and ready for installation on a FreeBSD system. You can download the source and install them very quickly and easily….. continued

Documentation

FreeBSD has many different options for documentation. They offer eight different kinds of documentation on their website including FAQ, Manual Pages, and the FreeBSD Handbook. There is also a web resources section, a for newbies section, and books and articles….. continued

Read the whole post here (webmasterbydesign.com – 08/10/2008)

FreeBSD 6.4-RC1 available

Ken Smith has announced the availability of the first release candidate for FreeBSD 6.4, the project’s production legacy branch

As the next step in the release of FreeBSD 6.4, the FreeBSD 6.4-RC1 builds are now available for testing. This is the first of an expected two release candidates. We encourage you to test out the release candidates, reporting any problems by submitting PRs or via email to the freebsd-stable list. If you would like to do a source-based update to 6.4-RC1 from an already installed machine you can update your tree to RELENG_6_4 using normal cvsup/csup methods. Note that as a somewhat inconvenient side-effect of the primary FreeBSD source repository now being in SVN the creation of the RELENG_6_4 branch in the CVS repository wound up checking in a ‘new’ version of every file, in some cases only changing the FBSDID

http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-stable/2008-October/045869.html