BSD at LinuxWorld 2008

pc-bsd girl and pc-bsd babe, in real life Gloria Galicia (photo left) and Perla Ibarra (photo middle), were representing FreeBSD/PC-BSD at the LinuxWorld 2008, San Francisco.

I work for one of the sponsors of BSD. I’ve never been to a trade show before and wanted to check it out and support BSD

says Galicia. Both ladies were at the BSD Booth with Matt Olander, CTO at iXsystems, to answer questions about FreeBSD and PC-BSD (incl. the upcoming PC-BSD 7 Fibonacci).

This operating system has been under steady development since the ’70s, and we’re a viable alternative to Linux,

said Matt Olander.

Source: wired.com (08/08/2008)

rc release: HeX LiveCD 2.0RC1

HeX LiveCD is a Network Security Monitoring (NSM) centric Live CD, built based on the principles of NSM, for analysts, by analysts. Besides containing most of the popular Open Source NSM tools and the Fluxbox window manager, the HeX Live CD also contains tools to perform network analysis.

After a long development on 2.x branch, HeX LiveCD 2.0-RC1 is now available. It’s FreeBSD 7.0 based and stuffed with lots of NSM apps. With unionfs, HeX 2.0-RC1 loads even faster than the previous version.

LINKS: Download | known issues | MD5 | Website

Setting up LAMP on FreeBSD (howto)

Referring to “LAMP” with regards to FreeBSD doesn’t make sense, but anyway, that’s how the author titled this howto “Setting up LAMP on FreeBSD“.

I’m not complaining, it’s always nice to see FreeBSD related article on Linux.com ;-)

Setting up a LAMP server is a common task for systems administrators, and FreeBSD is one of the most reliable and stable operating systems available. You can swap out the L in LAMP with F for FreeBSD to build a fast and reliable Web server.

In this article I assume FreeBSD is already installed. If not, make sure you download the latest stable production version of FreeBSD and run the installer. I recommend choosing the MINIMUM option at the installer screen to quickly install only the most basic and necessary things.

To install applications on FreeBSD, use the ports files. Ports are plain text files that know where to download source code, so that the software will be compiled on your computer. This way you can change settings (including or excluding specific modules) as you want, and the software will fit perfectly to the specifications of your computer. First, you have to make sure that the latest ports files are installed. If you’ve never installed the ports, issue portsnap fetch extract in the shell; otherwise, issue portsnap fetch update. This will download the latest ports files. After a bunch of messages that show you what files have been downloaded, you’re ready to go.

more…

Source: Linux.com (31/07/2008)