7 Linux/BSD firewalls reviewed (incl pfSense & m0n0wall)

Wayne Richardson reviewed in total 7 different Linux and BSD firewalls back in Nov 2007 (ClarckConnect, Endian, Gibraltar, IPCop, m0n0wall, pfSense, SmoothWall) and compared them on basis of the following categories: setup, web-gui, extensibility and speed.

Since this is a FreeBSD blog I’ll just quote (with his kind permission) what he wrote about pfSense and m0n0wall. If you’re interested in the whole article and want to see how the BSD firewalls compare to Linux firewall, please refer to Wayne’s article.

pfSense was named the best firewall with a 95% pass rate; m0nowall received a 77% mark and was the smallest of the bunch.
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The best of FreeBSD Basics – 2 reviews

Dru Lavigne’s latest book “The best of FreeBSD Basics” is now also available at Amazon.co.uk and has 2 reviews on Amazon.com.

Make no mistake about it…..Whether you are a novice or a system administrator, you need this book in your library. Unlike other FreeBSD books out there which basically copy the online handbook, Dru Lavigne compiled literally hundreds of FreeBSD tricks in this new book. You won’t be disappointed!

BSDA exam available from BSDCertification.org

BSD CertificationDru Lavigne has announced that the BSD Certification Group has finished the BSDA exam beta process and that it is now gone live. The BSD Associate certification marks the entry level for professional, community-based BSD certification, and work will continue to offer a certification for BSD Professionals (BSDP) next.

During 2008 the exam will be offered at technical conferences across the globe, in English only, and paper-based. The registration website for all BSDA exams is here. This site contains a calendar of upcoming events with details on each event. There is also a contact form should you wish to suggest an event.

Exciting future ahead for BSD

FreeBSD LogoTrollaxor has written up an interesting piece about the history and future of the major BSD systems: FreeBSD, netBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD and Darwin.

In the new year the Berkeley Software Distribution family of Unix-like operating systems is growing at a phenomenal rate and excitement over the possibilities for this operating system family is in the air. After unprecedented development and adoption as well as major shifts in the marketplace, it’s time to take a look at what’s new with this demonic family of operating systems.

FreeBSD

FreeBSD 5 was the darkest period in this operating system’s history and morale and marketshare were at an all-time low. The problem originated from merging BSD/OS into FreeBSD; though the two systems shared a lot of code, the difference of just a couple years was staggering. FreeBSD’s virtual memory and multi-processing code was immature, while BSD/OS’s libraries were archaic. Mating the two was a mess that cost FreeBSD face and kept users on an older branch from the Nineties, 4.11.

Now, with FreeBSD 7.0b on the horizon promising to wrap it all up, FreeBSD is once again taking the free Unix world by storm. It’s a tight, efficient codebase leveraging the best of BSD/OS, Darwin, and FreeBSD that users have been clamoring for. FreeBSD users and sites now have a shining future ahead of them.

… [discusses NetBSD, OpenBSD, DragonFlyBSD & Darwin]

With all of these great improvements to the Berkeley operating system family in the last few years, BSD is clearly where it’s at. Linux is a throwback to when Open Source was a hot buzzword and sharing code was a novel idea. Now, Apple and company use it as standard coding procedure to share and improve the tech they have and leverage their individual strengths.

Even when taking the few commercial Unices that still exist into account, like AIX and Solaris, BSD still owns the arena in its frantic steamroll to the top of the supercomputing mountain. Whether you want the general wholesomeness of FreeBSD, the KGB-like security of OpenBSD, the more experimental NetBSD or DragonFlyBSD, or the utter perfection of Mac OS X, BSD has your bases completely covered with room to grow in the future.

Read the whole article here

FreeBSD news – quick links (week 4)

Some quick links that you may want to check out.

FreeBSD: the rock

FreeBSD is a UNIX-like free operating system descended from AT&T UNIX via the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD) operating system. It runs on almost all known hardware architecture, including Microsoft Xbox, and has been called “the unknown giant among free operating systems.” It is generally regarded as being robust, which is why it is often called “the rock.” But what exactly makes this OS rock solid?

This article gives some background information about FreeBSD and BSD in general.

Full article can be read here

FreeBSD 7 will be revolutionary

FreeBSD LogoPinderkent has made a nice summary of why FreeBSD 7.0 release is something to look forward to:

A few weeks back, at the end of December, FreeBSD 7.0-RC1 was released. FreeBSD 7 will no doubt prove to be quite revolutionary. For one thing, this will be the first major FreeBSD release in a number of years. FreeBSD 6.0 was released in November of 2005, so there has been quite some time for the development of FreeBSD 7 to take place.

If you’re unfamiliar with what FreeBSD 7 will bring, I’d suggest that you look over the excellent What’s cooking for FreeBSD 7? Web page. As you can see, the amount of change FreeBSD 7 will bring is quite significant.

He goes on to mention

  • ZFS – Zetabyte File System ported from Sun Solaris
  • the new jemalloc userland memory allocator
  • improvements to the network stack
  • security enhancements, improved audio support, new SCHED_ULE replacement and
  • better support for linux binaries ,

and the article concludes with

It’s time for those of us in the IT profession to start considering the use of FreeBSD 7. The new features and improvements offered by this release will no doubt have a great impact for many of us. We will be getting better support for storing huge amounts of data, networking performance improvements to help us better transmit that data, and userland performance improvements to better let us manipulate it.

Note: bold by me. Whole article can be found here.