Migrate From MySQL to MariaDB In FreeBSD

unixmen has put together a howto showing how to migrate your databases from MySQL to MariaDB.

As most of you will be aware, since Oracle took over MySQL and took control of the project, a lot changed. Oracle doesn’t like open source and hence MySQL is dying a slow death. MySQL’s founder, Michael Widenius (+Michael Widenius), left the project and set up the competing MariaDB (+mariadb) database project.

If you’re not sure where MySQL is heading and want some security had use some new, cool features, have a look at and/or migrate to MariaDB.

MariaDB is a community-developed fork of the MySQL relational database management system, the impetus being the community maintenance of its free status under the GNU GPL. As a fork of a leading open source software system, it is notable for being led by its original developers and triggered by concerns over direction by an acquiring commercial company Oracle.

Migrate From MySQL To MariaDB In FreeBSD (unixmen)

BSDCan 2013 – Live Streaming and Groups Photo

scaleengine_logoAs you will be aware, the BSDCan 2013 Dev Summit has happened and the Conference taking place this weekend.

BSDCan is an annual conference for users and developers of the 4.4 BSD family of operating system, hosted each spring at the University of Ottawa in Ontario, Canada.

It has been possible to view (some of) the presentation on the Youtube BSDConferences Channel, but this year you will be able to watch live streams thanks to ScaleEngine, the Technical CDN and Silver Sponson

ScaleEngine is the Technical CDN, and so it is fitting that we are associated with the Technical BSD Conference. It’s pretty well known that we are a FreeBSD shop.

View the schedule for a list of the talks or watch via these channels:

https://www.scaleengine.com/read/740/The-BSDCan-2013-Conference/

This BSDCan 2013 Dev Summit group picture was posted on Flickr by Will Backman, who runs bsdtalk.

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Click for larger size.

BSDTalk interview with Kris Moore (PC-BSD)

Podcast LogosBSDTalk has a 12 minutes interview with Kris Moore (BSDTalk225) about PC-BSD, recorded at BSDCan 2013. Listen to the podcast as MP3 or OGG.

Previous interviews with Kris Moore can be found here:

freebsdnews.net: 6 years today

6yearsfreebsdnews.net started exactly 6 years ago on 17 May 2007 with the post What is cooking for FreeBSD (7)?

I had never thought the site would make it 6 years, but thanks to feedback, suggestions and contributions from quite a number of you readers, I’ve been encouraged to keep it up and as a result it’s still here.

It has been a good journey so far and it has been great to see FreeBSD develop so much over these years, from 7.0 to 10-current.

Let me know how the site can be improved (I’m thinking of a new theme) or if you have any other suggestions.

 

F# on FreeBSD

F#_Fsharp_logoF#  (pronounced F Sharp) is an open source, functional-first programming language which empowers users and organisations to tackle complex computing problems with simple, maintainable and robust code. It was released by Microsoft and is used in a wide range of application areas and is available across multiple platforms.

F# has recently been made F# more readily available on FreeBSD:

Since my original post, I’ve been contacted by a few people who wanted to try F# on FreeBSD but didn’t know how to set it up (or who ran into trouble when they tried). So, I spent a couple of hours last weekend writing up detailed instructions for installing Mono 3.0, F# 3.0, and emacs on FreeBSD, and they’re now available on fsharp.org.

I tested the instructions on a fresh installation of FreeBSD 9.1-RELEASE (32-bit) in VirtualBox on 64-bit Windows 7, and everything worked as it should. If you try the instructions — and you should :) — and run into problems, please start a new thread here on the mailing list and I’ll help you get it fixed. (In this case, conversing on the mailing list is preferable so the solution is available to everyone.) (src)

If you’re interested in installing and using F# on FreeBSD, have a look at the F# FreeBSD page with all the steps you need to take.

I had never heard of it till today. But I’m not a programmer ;-)  More information on F# can be found here :