Messaging 10bn Whatsapps a day with FreeBSD

Whatsapp, the popular messaging startup, managed to record 10 billion messages in one day, comprising 6 billion outbound messages and 4 billion inbound messages.

WhatsApp Messenger is a cross-platform mobile messaging app which allows you to exchange messages without having to pay for SMS. WhatsApp Messenger is available for iPhone, BlackBerry, Android, Windows Phone and Nokia!

Whatsapp tweeted about their new milestone last week:

“new daily record: 4B inbound, 6B outbound = 10B total messages a day! #freebsd #erlang.”

The hashtags are references to the technology behind WhatsApp: the app was developed largely on the open source platform FreeBSD using the Erlang programming language originally written by Ericsson.

FreeBSD proves again it’s a great operating system for high demand services.

BSDTutorial youtube channel (videos)

I came across the BSD Tutorial channel on youtube that has some useful videos. They’re short and clear.

The following are related to managing and maintaining FreeBSD:

The website related to this channel is http://bsdtutorial.org

Miscelaneous FreeBSD news updates (Calligra, EC2, Dev’s Corner, GhostBSD)

Tarsnap article and paypal payments

Tarsnap is an online service where you can securely backup your data. It is maintained by Colin Percifal, an ex FreeBSD Security Officer.

Tarsnap is a secure online backup service for BSD, Linux, OS X, Minix, Solaris, Cygwin, and probably many other UNIX-like operating systems. The Tarsnap client code provides a flexible and powerful command-line interface which can be used directly or via shell scripts.

Linux Journal has a 10 page article on Tarsnap in its latest issue.

Collin recently announced you can now pay by credit card for the Tarsnap service, in addition to Paypal.

FreeBSD Supported on Windows Server Hyper-V via Beta Release

Microsoft and collaborators today announced a beta release of drivers that enable the open source FreeBSD 8.2 server operating system to run in a virtual machine (VM) using Microsoft’s Hyper-V Server.

The beta, which isn’t intended for use in production environments, can be downloaded from the GitHub portal here. Installation instructions can be accessed on this page. The code was released under a FreeBSD license.

In the near future, GitHub will supply ISO images of FreeBSD that will include the new drivers. The collaboration, which involved Microsoft, Insight Global, Citrix and NetApp, was highlighted at the BSDCan 2012 event in May.

via redmondmag