FreeBSD Events Updates (Scale, AsiaBSDCon, BSDCan)

A new year, a new series of FreeBSD Conferences. Mark them in your diaries if you’re planning to go.

SCALE 2012

iXsystem, FreeNAS, PC-BSD and the FreeBSD Foundation will be represented at SCALE Linux Expo 2012. The Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) is an annual Linux, Open-Source, and Free Software conference held in Los Angeles. This event will be held in Los Angeles from 20-22 Jan.

AsiaBSDCon 2012

AsiaBSDCon 2012 is a conference for users and developers on BSD based systems. The next conference will be held in Tokyo from 22-25 March. You can apply for a FreeBSD Foundation travel grant.

BSDCan 2012

BSDCan 2012 will be held 11-12 May, 2012 in Ottawa at the University of
Ottawa. It will be preceded by two days of tutorials on 9-10 May. There’s a call for papers.

New FreeBSD Foundation funded projects (IPv6, auditdistd)

The FreeBSD Foundation has announced it will be funding two new projects:

1. Performance analysis of FreeBSD’s IPv6 stack by Bjoern Zeeb

The project will carry out a detailed performance analysis starting with benchmarking IPv6 to IPv4 to get up-to-date numbers to better understand where we are. It will then continue to identify the origins of differences in performance, and where possible, directly address them or identify areas of future work. Having initial benchmark numbers will allow changes to be evaluated by re-running the measurements and quantifying the improvements.

2. Implementing auditdistd daemon by Pawel Jakub Dawidek

The goal of the auditdistd project is to securely and reliably distribute audit records over the TCP/IP network from a local auditdistd daemon to a remote auditdistd daemon. In case of source system compromise, the attacker’s activity can be analysed using data collected by the remote system, as only the remote system’s audit logs can still be trusted.

More details can be found on the FreeBSD Foundation’s blog: auditdistd project and IPv6 project.

CAM Target Layer committed to HEAD

Ken Merry committed CTL to HEAD for testing earlier this week.

From the commit message:

CTL is a disk and processor device emulation subsystem originally written for Copan Systems under Linux starting in 2003. It has been shipping in Copan (now SGI) products since 2005. It was ported to FreeBSD in 2008, and thanks to an agreement between SGI (who acquired Copan’s assets in 2010) and Spectra Logic in 2010, CTL is available under a BSD-style license. The intent behind the agreement was that Spectra would work to get CTL into the FreeBSD tree.

The FreeBSD Foundation spoke to Ken about the benefits of CTL and this is what he had to say.

FreeBSD 9.0 Release posts

The release of FreeBSD 9.0 has been picked up by quite a few (Linux related) websites. Some of them are copies of the release announcement, others have more to say.

Just sharing some I’ve come across:

If you know of any in-depth annoucement posts or reviews, let us know in the comments below or on our Google+ Page.

FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE Available

Some of you guys already emailed me last week about the release of FreeBSD 9, but it wasn’t until today that it became official: The FreeBSD project has now officially announced the availability of FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE. ISO’s were already available for some days and torrents were seeding, but if you wanted to wait till FreeBSD 9 was official, go get it whilst the cake is hot.

If you couldn’t wait and downloaded a DVD image for amd64 and i386 last week, you’re advised to download it again, as there were some issues.

The FreeBSD Project dedicates the FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE to the memory of Dennis M. Ritchie, one of the founding fathers of the UNIX operating system. It is on the foundation laid by the work of visionaries like Dennis that software like the FreeBSD operating system came to be.

A few highlights in this latest release are:

  • A new installer, bsdinstall(8) has been added and is the installer used by the ISO images provided as part of this release
  • The Fast Filesystem now supports softupdates journaling
  • ZFS updated to version 28
  • Updated ATA/SATA drivers support AHCI, moved into updated CAM framework
  • Highly Available Storage (HAST) framework
  • Kernel support for Capsicum Capability Mode, an experimental set of features for sandboxing support
  • User-level DTrace
  • The TCP/IP stack now supports pluggable congestion control framework and five congestion control algorithm implementations available
  • NFS subsystem updated, new implementation supports NFSv4 in addition to NFSv3 and NFSv2
  • High Performance SSH (HPN-SSH)
  • Flattened device tree (FDT), simplifying FreeBSD configuration for embedded platforms
  • The powerpc architecture now supports Sony Playstation 3
  • The LLVM compiler infrastructure and Clang have been imported
  • Gnome version 2.32.1, KDE version 4.7.3

FreeBSD has excellent platform support. AMD64, i386, ia64, PowerPC, PowerPC64, or Sparc, they’re all recognised without any problems. Some of you may be pleased to hear that FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE is now also available for Amazon EC2.

Check the Release Notes and Release Errata before installation for any late-breaking news and/or issues with 9.0. More information about FreeBSD releases can be found on the Release Information page.

Download FreeBSD 9.0-RELEASE

FreeBSD News on Google+

You’re probably aware of our Google+ Page. I prefer Google+ for social networking over Facebook as its privacy settings are better and it’s easier to share news and interact with others.

If you’re on Google+ you can +1 us and add us to your page or profile.

I’m going to link to FreeBSD related Google+ pages (services, companies, operating systems etc). If you’re aware of any not listed below, please leave a comment below or add a comment to the Google+ page. Your help is appreciated.

FreeBSD Foundation 2011 fund-raising a success

The FreeBSD Foundation announced on its Facebook page that it has raised $426,292, surpassing the $400,000 goal. This is even without the cheques they have received. Great result.

As you will know, the Foundation uses these donations to promote and protect FreeBSD, as well as funding FreeBSD related projects.

Two newly projects for 2012 announced on 31 December are:

  • auditdistd project (Pawel Jakub Dawidek)
  • IPv6 Performance Analysis project (Bjoern Zeeb)

I’m sure we’ll see more announcements this year about new projects.

Happy New Year

Wishing you all a good and prosperous 2012.

Hopefully we’ll see FreeBSD 9 released soon and some exciting new projects announced to make FreeBSD and operating systems based on it, the best branch of operating systems available.

What would you like to see worked on or added to FreeBSD in 2012?