New FreeBSD Audio System for the Kernel

Wolfgang Draxinger has started developing a new audio sub-system for the Linux kernel became frustrated by ALSA, OSS4, and PulseAudio. This new audio system is called KLANG, the Kernel Level Audio Next Generation.

The developer hopes KLANG will work not only with the Linux kernel but also the FreeBSD kernel. The open-source project is described as offering

“professional grade audio, that means lowest possible latency, latency compensation and bit exact precision at a very low CPU load. KLANG has been designed as a signal routing system, supporting seamless and transparent signal transport between all endpoints. In practice this means that there’s no distinction between hardware and process endpoints. Each endpoint is either a signal source or a sink, allowing for versatile signal routing topologies. All connections are fully latency compensated. A metronome system synchronizes the signal processing to a configurable set of system internal and external clock sources. This greatly simplifies tasks like audio/video synchronization.”

More information can be found on the KLANG website.

News FreeBSD Core Team Elected (2012)

The FreeBSD Core Team acts as the project’s “board of directors” and is responsible for approving new src committers, resolving disputes between developers, appointing members for sub-teams (security officer, release engineering, port managers, webmaster, etc …). The Core Team has been elected by FreeBSD developers every two years since 2000.

The FreeBSD Project is run by FreeBSD committers, or developers who have SVN/CVS commit access.

The bi-annual election period is now over and the new members (re-)elected:

  • Thomas Abthorpe
  • Gavin Atkinson
  • John Baldwin
  • Konstantin Belousov
  • David Chisnall
  • Attilio Rao
  • Hiroki Sato
  • Peter Wemm
  • Martin Wilke

Congratulations to all.

You can read more about the FreeBSD Core Team on wikipedia.

If you are aware of any other resources, please leave a comment.

U-Boot for Raspberry Pi

U-Boot for Raspberry Pi is now working. This is a “fairly stable, flexible u-boot distribution suitable to be used as an environment for OS bring-up”.

So, current state of affairs is:

  • USB support
  • SD card support (FAT filesystem)
  • Support for built-in USB ethernet
  • Autoimport environment from uEnv.txt
  • Autorun of boot script (boot.scr)

Next stage is to get FreeBSD working on Raspberry Pi.