FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 Available (Official)

It is now official: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 is available for download.

The second of the Release Candidate builds for the 9.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Since this is the first release of a brand new branch I cross-post the announcements on both -current and -stable.
But just so you know most of the developers active in head and stable/9 pay more attention to the -current mailing list. If you notice problems you can report them through the normal Gnats PR system or on the -current mailing list.

The 9.0-RELEASE cycle can be tracked at wiki.freebsd.org/Releng/9.0TODO.

For update details, MD5 checsums and FTP locationts, check out the announcement: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 Available.

Happy testing.

Heads up: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 seeding

There’s no official announcement yet, but for the fearless and those that can’t wait: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 is being uploaded to the different, international mirrors.

One of the places where you can grab your copy, is ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/i386/i386/ISO-IMAGES/9.0/

As usual, until there’s formal announcement, the files may have errors and can be removed at any time.

BHyVe – a Native FreeBSD Hypervisor

How to install and help test FreeBSD’s exciting new BHyVe hypervisor

Michael Dexter has published a tutorial on CFT on FreeBSD‘s upcoming type 2 hypervisor known as BHyVe. The article is an easy to follow tutorial showing how to configure, build and boot a hypervisor capable host and guest system. BHyVe currently only supports modern Intel’s x86 virtualization hardware & the project itself is still currently under early development.

FreeBSD is very much lacking virtualization features (not counting jails) and the BHyVe project is excellent news for FreeBSD!

“Neel Natu and Peter Grehan unveiled BHyVe (PDF), the “BSD HyperVisor” (incl. Audio) for FreeBSD at BSDCan 2011 and kindly helped me get it up and running. I invite you to do the same and explore the many possibilities of this up and coming alternative to Linux KVM. Because BHyVe relies primarily on the Virtual Machine Manager vmm.ko kernel module, it should be portable to other BSD’s and even other operating systems. BHyVe guest virtual machines run modified FreeBSD kernels at this time and there are many opportunities to remove this limitation. Be aware that BHyVe is under active development and should be considered experimental.”

Full article and howto: Hands-on BHyVe.

Thanks to Fernando and Krzysztof for the heads up.

Links

Writing FreeBSD kernel modules

Writing a FreeBSD kernel module. Many may think this is a difficult task, but if you know the basics of programming and have some knowledge of and experience with FreeBSD, it may not be as difficult as it sounds.

Jared Barneck has put together an easy to follow guide showing the basics of writing a “hello world” module: How to write a FreeBSD Kernel Module

Follow Jared’s steps and check out some of the online resources he’s linked to, and you’re ready to go.

Happy programming.

Some thoughts on UNIX and testing Opera on FreeBSD

Ruarí Ødegaard, who works for Opera, has put a post up with some of his thoughts on FreeBSD and Opera on FreeBSD: Some thoughts on UNIX and testing Opera on FreeBSD.

So I was actually quite excited last week when the new FreeBSD 9 RC 1 was released. Unlike with new releases of some of the Linux distros, I don’t usually have late night fears that Opera will get broken by some new major change or other. p

FreeBSD has a deserved reputation for being reliable and robust and not rushing change for its own sake. Nonetheless with any OS upgrade there is always the chance that we will have to make changes to accommodate, so with the release of RC1 I figured now was as good a time as any to give it a spin.

Installing FreeBSD with the new BSDInstall went without problems and so was running Opera.

Opera is a fast and full-featured Internet browser that includes pop-up blocking, tabbed browsing, integrated searches, and advanced functions like E-mail program, RSS Newsfeeds and IRC chat. You can install Opera on FreeBSD from /usr/pors/www/opera.

Ruari’s post: Some thoughts on UNIX and testing Opera on FreeBSD

Thanks to Mark B for emailing the link.

Thanks

(updated) Network Security monitoring using FreeBSD (Richard Bejtlich)

Richard Bejtlich as a security expert with a lot of experience on FreeBSD. This video is about network security monitoring using FreeBSD:

“I’ve been using FreeBSD as my preferred platform for Network Security Monitoring (NSM) since 2000. In this presentation I’ll discuss my latest thinking on using FreeBSD to identify normal, suspicious, and malicious traffic in enterprise networks. FreeBSD is a powerful platform for network traffic inspection and log analysis, and I’ll share a few ways I use it in production environments.”


 

FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (July – September 2011)

This report covers FreeBSD-related projects between April and June 2011. It is the third of the four reports planned for 2011: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (July – September 2011).

This quarter was mainly devoted to polishing the bits for the next major version of FreeBSD, 9.0, which is to be released by then end of this year.

From the table of contents:

Projects

FreeBSD Team Reports

Network Infrastructure

Kernel

Documentation

Architectures

Ports

Miscellaneous

Google Summer of Code

Read: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (July – September 2011.

Why aren’t you using FreeBSD?

Paul Venezia wonders why more folks aren’t using FreeBSD.

‘There used to be a saying — at least I’ve said it many times — that my workstations run Linux, my servers run FreeBSD. Sure, it’s quicker to build a Linux box, do a “yum install x y z” and toss it out into the wild as a fully functional server, but the extra time required to really get a FreeBSD box tuned will come back in spades through performance and stability metrics. You’ll get more out of the hardware, be that virtual or physical, than you will on a generic Linux binary installation.’

FreeBSD is a free, fast, stable, feature-rich operating system. If you’ve never looked into it before, you should.

Thanks, Fernando, for emailing the link.