FreeBSD News WordPress Template (free)

Recently I came across this free ‘FreeBSD-themed’ WordPress Template (WordPress is a web-based platform creating a websites or blogs):

Features:

  • 2 columns,
  • black, red and white colours
  • Pages in header
  • RSS Feed button in footer
  • free WordPress template
  • Sidebar  on right hand side

If you want to set up a FreeBSD themed blog with standard FreeBSD colours, but without having to do much/any tweaking, have a look at this theme: FreeBSD News Free WordPress Template

Available: FreeBSD 8.2-RC3 and 7.4-RC3

Ken Smith has announced the 3rd Release Candidate of FreeBSD 8.2 (production version) and FreeBSD 7.4 (legacy version). This release is slightly delayed (planned for 24 January) and there are still a few outstanding items on the todo lists (8.2, 7.4).

FreeBSD 8.2-RC3 is available for AMD64, i386, IA64, PC98, PowerPc and Sparc64, while FreeBSD 7.4-RC3 only runs on AMD64, i386, Pc98 and Sparc64. Instructions how to update to the release candidate versions can be found in the announcement.

Links:

McKusick tells of the BSD days as only he can

Marshall McKusick is a great public speaker (some youtube videos) and recently he did again a great presentation at LCA 2011:

“The drought of those who speak without depending on slides has ended at the 12th Australian national Linux conference.

“Last evening, Marshall Kirk McKusick, a well-known BSD hacker, took those assembled down a slightly different track – after all, this is a Linux conference – with his narrative history of BSD. And what a rollicking ride it was!

“McKusick was, rather unfortunately, put down for the last slot of the day, 4.45pm, when many tired and footloose souls had vended their way homewards to charge their batteries for the next day. And the venue for his talk could hold only 100 people.”

Read more: McKusick tells of the BSD days as only he can

FreeBSD or Debian Linux? FreeBSD or Linux?

This is an often asked question in newsgroups and forums. The reason for this, is that there is no easy answer. If a straight forward answer could be given, it could have been found on Wikipedia. The fact is, that it is not a yes-or-no-answer question.

Often you will see this ‘political’ answer “It depends”. It depends how you’re planning to use the operating system (desktop, server) and where (home, data center, server room, embedded etc).

Both Linux and FreeBSD have their strong and weak points, but overall, they can do almost anything you ask it to do, but when one wants an answer to the question “FreeBSD or (Debian) Linux?” one needs to find an answer to the following questions first to see which operating system suits one’s needs best:

1) Is your current hardware supported? If the purchase of new hardware is planned, is it supported by either/both?

2) Which operating system is supported by the third party commercial applications vendors that you use? If it is not supported, is there an acceptable equivalent available for the operating system your preference goes out to?

3) Are your current networking hardware (and appliances) supported by the O/S?

4) Are any new third party system management and monitoring tools required? If so, are they supported by the “new” OS?

5) Is  your storage hardware and servers supported by your preferred O/S? think of Network Attached Storage, SAN’s RAID, Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE).

5) Is the IT department capable of maintaining (and further developing) the new system, or is there a need to hire new staff? Or, can you get consulting services and/or third party support for your operating system?

There are plenty more questions that can be asked before deciding whether it’s Linux or FreeBSD that fits your needs best.

Have you been in a (work / home) situation where you had to make the choice? It would be nice to find out about your experience. Please share via the comments.

FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Oct – Dec 2010)

Another quarter, another FreeBSD status report: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Oct – Dec 2010).

Once again, there are some interesting updates which show FreeBSD 9 is shaping up nicely with many features to look forward to. Some of the highlights: ZFS v28, Chromium Port, DIFFUSE, FreeBSD on Amazon EC2, Trim for USF.

Table of Contents:

Continue reading

Available: FreeBSD 7.4-RC2

The second Release Candidate build for the FreeBSD-7.4 release cycle is available from the FreeBSD website for testing. ISO images fcan be downloaded from most of the FreeBSD mirror sites. Check out the official announcement for further details about this release.

The original release date 24/1/2010 – today) won’t be achieved as per the 7.4 releng page. There’s yet a RC-3 to be announced, but quality is more important than sticking to dates and releasing an unfinished product with bugs.

Links: FreeBSD | FreeBSD 7.4 todo

What version of FreeBSD are you using (Poll)?

Time for a Poll. If FreeBSD is running nicely on your server then there’s not always a need to update or upgrade to the latest versions.

Some people are still running happily FreeBSD 4.x on their servers, whereas others like to stay up to date, or even test FreeBSD 9.

Out of interest, it would be nice to see which FreeBSD versions are currently being used (this excludes any operating systems based on FreeBSD, e.g. PC-BSD). If you use more than one version, you may select more.

If you’d like a comment as to why you’re using the version(s) you’re using, feel free to do so.

What version of FreeBSD are you using

View Results

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Miscelaneous (Free)BSD news and links (Week 2)

I End of Life Announcement for PC-BSD 7.x

With the release of version 8.2 just around the corner, and PC-BSD 9.0 slated for later this year, we will be stopping the production of new packages / PBIs for the PC-BSD 7.x series in the near future: End of Life Announcement for PC-BSD 7.x

II Required: Senior FreeBSD/UNIX/Linux Administrator

You might be our next Sr. Systems Engineer: Senior FreeBSD/UNIX/Linux Administrator

III FreeBSD: Virtual Network Switch

In the previous post, I have mentioned about I’m going to cover Open vSwitch and Vde implementation. However I think it is also interesting to cover how you can setup virtual switch with FreeBSD native system. As we all know bridging is actually software switching, therefore we can make use of bridge interface to achieve this. I will explain the 6 ports virtual network switch setup that is illustrated in the diagram below: FreeBSD: Virtual Network Switch

IV Installing pfSense on an Alix.6e1

The ALIX.6e1 hardware platform:

2 10/100 LAN / 1 miniPCI / 1 miniPCI Express / AMD LX800 / 256 MB / 2 USB / DB9 serial port / CF Card slot / Board size: 6 x 6 : Installing pfSense on an Alix.6e1