Writing FreeBSD kernel modules

Writing a FreeBSD kernel module. Many may think this is a difficult task, but if you know the basics of programming and have some knowledge of and experience with FreeBSD, it may not be as difficult as it sounds.

Jared Barneck has put together an easy to follow guide showing the basics of writing a “hello world” module: How to write a FreeBSD Kernel Module

Follow Jared’s steps and check out some of the online resources he’s linked to, and you’re ready to go.

Happy programming.

Some thoughts on UNIX and testing Opera on FreeBSD

Ruarí Ødegaard, who works for Opera, has put a post up with some of his thoughts on FreeBSD and Opera on FreeBSD: Some thoughts on UNIX and testing Opera on FreeBSD.

So I was actually quite excited last week when the new FreeBSD 9 RC 1 was released. Unlike with new releases of some of the Linux distros, I don’t usually have late night fears that Opera will get broken by some new major change or other. p

FreeBSD has a deserved reputation for being reliable and robust and not rushing change for its own sake. Nonetheless with any OS upgrade there is always the chance that we will have to make changes to accommodate, so with the release of RC1 I figured now was as good a time as any to give it a spin.

Installing FreeBSD with the new BSDInstall went without problems and so was running Opera.

Opera is a fast and full-featured Internet browser that includes pop-up blocking, tabbed browsing, integrated searches, and advanced functions like E-mail program, RSS Newsfeeds and IRC chat. You can install Opera on FreeBSD from /usr/pors/www/opera.

Ruari’s post: Some thoughts on UNIX and testing Opera on FreeBSD

Thanks to Mark B for emailing the link.

Thanks

(updated) Network Security monitoring using FreeBSD (Richard Bejtlich)

Richard Bejtlich as a security expert with a lot of experience on FreeBSD. This video is about network security monitoring using FreeBSD:

“I’ve been using FreeBSD as my preferred platform for Network Security Monitoring (NSM) since 2000. In this presentation I’ll discuss my latest thinking on using FreeBSD to identify normal, suspicious, and malicious traffic in enterprise networks. FreeBSD is a powerful platform for network traffic inspection and log analysis, and I’ll share a few ways I use it in production environments.”


 

FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (July – September 2011)

This report covers FreeBSD-related projects between April and June 2011. It is the third of the four reports planned for 2011: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (July – September 2011).

This quarter was mainly devoted to polishing the bits for the next major version of FreeBSD, 9.0, which is to be released by then end of this year.

From the table of contents:

Projects

FreeBSD Team Reports

Network Infrastructure

Kernel

Documentation

Architectures

Ports

Miscellaneous

Google Summer of Code

Read: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (July – September 2011.

Why aren’t you using FreeBSD?

Paul Venezia wonders why more folks aren’t using FreeBSD.

‘There used to be a saying — at least I’ve said it many times — that my workstations run Linux, my servers run FreeBSD. Sure, it’s quicker to build a Linux box, do a “yum install x y z” and toss it out into the wild as a fully functional server, but the extra time required to really get a FreeBSD box tuned will come back in spades through performance and stability metrics. You’ll get more out of the hardware, be that virtual or physical, than you will on a generic Linux binary installation.’

FreeBSD is a free, fast, stable, feature-rich operating system. If you’ve never looked into it before, you should.

Thanks, Fernando, for emailing the link.

How to configure a pfSense 2.0 Cluster using CARP

howtoforge.com has a easy to follow tutorial (How to configure a pfSense 2.0 Cluster using CARP) showing you how to set up a pfSense cluster with CARP.

In this HowTo I will show you how to configure a pfSense 2.0 Cluster using CARP Failover. pfSense is quite a advanced (open-source) firewall being used everywhere from homes to enterprise level networks, I have been playing around with pfsense now for the last 3 months and to be honest I am not looking back, it is packed full of features and can be deployed easily within minutes depending on your requirements.

This howto is based on this tutorial on pfSense’s website: Configuring pfSense Hardware Redundancy (CARP).

 

FreeBSD Events (CE BSDday, EuroBSDCon, BSDday Arg)

These are some links to past and upcoming FreeBSD related events:

Central European BSD day 2011 (Slovakia)

Central Europen BSDDay 2011 is taking place in Bratislava, Slovakia, on 5 November.

The purpose of this one-day event is to gather Central European developers of today’s open-source BSD systems, popularize their work, and provide an interface for real-life communication. There are no formalities, no papers, and no registration or participation fee, however the invited developers are encouraged to give a talk on their favorite BSD-related topic, then have a beer with the other folks around. The language of this event is English, and the goal is to motivate potential future developers and users, especially undergraduate university students to work with BSD systems.

For more info and to see the schedule of lectures, visit the Central Europen BSDday 2011 page.

BSDday Argentina 2011

BSDday Argentina is taking place on 5 November 2011 too.

For more info (currently quite sparce) visit the BSDDay Argentina 2011 website.

Google Code-In 2011

DragonFlyBSD is taking part. Would be good to see all major BSD projects getting involved. Google Code-in 2011.

EuroBSDCon 2011

The FreeBSD Foundation has added some trip reports of FreeBSD Foundation funded trips to the EuroBSDCon 2011 earlier this month.

Clang on FreeBSD (mp3)

The mp3 of Adam David Alan Martin’s NYCBUG  presentation (“Clang on FreeBSD”) is now available at http://www.fetissov.org/public/nycbug/nycbug-10-05-11.mp3