FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Apr – Jun 2011)

This report covers FreeBSD-related projects between April and June 2011. It is the second of the four reports planned for 2011: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Apr – Jun 2011)

Since this quarter, the work is being focused on the next major version of FreeBSD, 9.0, which is to be released in September.

I’m happy to see the progress that’s been made with Chromium and Clang.

Keep up the good work, devs!

From the Table of Contents:

Projects

FreeBSD Team Reports

Network Infrastructure

Kernel

Documentation

Architectures

Ports

Miscellaneous

Google Summer of Code

Full version:

FreeBSD Events Update (vendor summit, KyivBSD, SFD, netmap video)

I have linked to a couple of past and upcoming FreeBSD events that are worth sharing.

 

1. FreeBSD vendor summit (3-4 November)

I wasn’t aware of any FreeBSD vendor event, but there’s one from 3-4 November 2011 in Sunnyvale, California.

This is an opportunity for developers and vendors to share project direction and goals, collaborate on various projects.

If you’re a vendor using FreeBSD, or you’re a vendor thinking about using FreeBSD in a project (wireless or otherwise) this mini-conference is just for you.

(via Adrian Chadd’s blog)

2. KyivBSD 2011 (24 September)

KyivBSD will be held on 24 September 2001 at the University of Taras Shevchenko, Kiev, Ukraine. Registration for the free KyivBSD event is now open.

3. Participate in Software Freedom Day (17 September)

FreeBSD is taking part in the Software Freedom Day (SFD), as announced on the FreeBSD Foundation Blog:

“Software Freedom Day (SFD) is an annual global event that encourages open source software users to reach out to their local community to educate others about the benefits of using open source.

Frederic Muller, President of SFI, the non-profit organization behind Software Freedom Day, has been very helpful in encouraging FreeBSD users to participate in SFD. FreeBSD is listed as a partner on the SFD website. In addition, the FreeBSD logo is included on the cover letter and a copy of PC-BSD was included with the 210 packages that were shipped to the pre-registered teams. He also added the FreeBSD news RSS feed to planet SFD so that other SFD participants will get FreeBSD updates.” Continues

4. Presentation by Luigi Rizzo on Netmap on Google Tech Talks Channel

Luigi Rizza, a FreeBSD developer, presented on Google Tech Talks.

“Software packet processing at line rate is problematic both in userspace and within the kernel, due to the cost of managing in-kernel metadata, and system calls/and data copy overhead.”

Video: Netmap: A Novel Framework for High Speed Packet I/O

Check out the Youtube BSD Conferences channel for more FreeBSD related videos.

5. Two interviews with the FreeBSD Core Team members (Russian).

Igor Savchuk has conducted some interviews with Andrei Chernov and Konstantin Belousov:

The conversation is in Russian, but with Google Translate you’ll get the gist of the conversation.

Howto: Keeping FreeBSD up-to-date

Vermaden has posted two very useful step-by-step tutorials on the FreeBSD Forums showing how you can keep your base system and applications up-to-date (the vermaden way):

As always, the FreeBSD Handbook also has an excellent chapter on this topic: Updating FreeBSD.

RootBSD has posted a howto showing how you can update FreeBSD with Webmin if you run a VPS or dedicated server:

Since I began using FreeBSD 4.x, I quickly learned of Webmin, a web-based server administration tool, which allows administrators to manage everything from: Mysql, Apache, Sendmail, system processes, networking and much more. One of the coolest features of Webmin is it’s modular structure. Modules can easily be downloaded and installed to fit your specific server needs. In this quick tutorial you will learn how to install and use Webmin.

With RootBSD you get ease of mind and full control with all of the advantages from a dedicated server: full root access, customizable environment, and guaranteed hardware resources.

FreeBSD Installer 9.0 (BSDInstall) screenshots

If you haven’t  had a chance to try out the new FreeBSD Installer and you’re keen to see what it looks like, Phoronix has a couple of screenshots.

The new system installer is described as a modern installer for FreeBSD that’s able to take advantage of its more modern features. The pc-sysinstall installer, which is a complete replacement to its earlier installer, is written 100% in shell.

The Installer is referred to as pc-sysinstall, but that should be BSDInstall, I think. pc-sysinstall is PC-BSD’s installer, though it should be possible to make it a FreeBSD installer. Most of you will know that FreeBSD can be installed from the PC-BSD installation DVD.

HighPoint ships FreeBSD compliant four-port SAS-6Gb/s controller

HighPoint Technologies, a storage solutions manufacturer, said Thursday that it had begun shipments of its cost-efficient SAS-6Gb/s HBA, the RocketRAID 2711. The device is the first-in-the-industry controller with support up to four serial attached SCSI (SAS) hard drives that costs $179.

The HighPoint RockerRAID 2711 controller is an external 4-port, SAS 6Gb/s PCI Express 2.0 x8 RAID controller that directly supports up to 4 SAS/SATA devices in a variety of storage configurations. The device is specifically designed for workstations and entry-level servers. The controller fully supports external mini-SAS port (SFF-8088), which simplifies installation procedures of external hard disk drives.

The RocketRAID 2711 can support SAS and SATA devices in a multitude of configurations, including non-RAID JBOD’s, single disks, and RAID arrays including 0, 1, 5, 10 and 50, and includes Highpoint’s Unified Web-Based Management interface, which allows both novices and experts to quickly configure, manage and monitor storage configurations.

According to HighPoint, the RocketRAID 2711 delivers enterprise management and connectivity features at entry level costs.

The RocketRAID 2711 is fully backwards compatible with SAS/SATA 3Gb/s devices, PCI-Express 1.0 motherboards, and can be easily integrated into existing storage infrastructure, the manufacturer said.

The RocketRAID 2711 is compliant with all major operating systems including Windows, Mac OS X, Linux and FreeBSD.

A serial version of the SCSI interface, which has been parallel since its inception in 1986. Ratified by ANSI in 2003 as the next-generation SCSI technology, SAS is a point-to-point architecture that uses a disk controller (host bus adapter) with four or more channels that operate simultaneously. Each full-duplex channel, known as a SAS port, transfers data at 3 or 6 Gbps in each direction. SAS also supports Serial ATA (SATA) drives, which can be mixed with SAS drives in a variety of configurations. (pc-mag)

FreeBSD 9.0-BETA2 available for testing, esp BSDInstall

Ken Smith has announced today the availability of FreeBSD 9.0-BETA2, which is little over a month past the initially planned date of 3 August. The FreeBSD 9.0 release schedule is expected to be updated with new BETA and RC dates.

The second BETA build for the FreeBSD-9.0 release cycle is now available. [...] ISO images for the architectures amd64, i386, powerpc, powerpc64, and sparc64 are available on most of our FreeBSD mirror sites. [...] One of the many new features in 9.0 we would like to be tested is the new installer, so we encourage our users to do fresh installation on test systems.

Many new features found their way into FreeBSD (what’s cooking for FreeBSD 9), but the thing that needs most testing at this stage is the new installer (BSDInstall). Testers are encouraged to do fresh installations on test systems.

If you’re interested in learning more about the features of FreeBSD 9.0, check out the FreeBSD-CURRENT release notes.

For download locations and MD5′s, head over to the announcement email.

FreeBSD Foundation Newsletter – August 2011

In the latest edition of the semi annual FreeBSD Foundation newsletter you can read about:

Good to see how the Foundation spends received donations on some promising projects.

Read the full newsletter here: FreeBSD Foundation Newsletter – August 2011