ZFS v28 in FreeBSD 9-CURRENT

Pawel Jakub Dawidek has added the latest open-source ZFS file system version (28) to FreeBSD Current.

Few new things available now are:

  • Data deduplication (info)
  • Triple parity RAIDZ (RAIDZ3).
  • zfs diff (info)
  • zpool split (info)
  • Snapshot holds (info)
  • zpool import -F. Allows to rewind corrupted pool to earlier transaction group
  • Possibility to import pool in read-only mode

PJD has done a great job adding these features to FreeBSD. Is FreeBSD going to be the future of FreeBSD? Some think so: FreeBSD wordt the toekomst van ZFS (Dutch) – (translate)

Released: FreeBSD 8.2-RELEASE and 7.4-RELEASE

After some delays FreeBSD 8.2-RELEASE and FreeBSD 7.4-RELEASE are now available. Originally scheduled for January 24 the releases were put back to allow for a third release candidate. Be sure to check the Release Notes (8.2 | 7.4) and Release Errata (8.2 | 7.4) before installation for any late-breaking news and/or issues. More information about FreeBSD releases can be found on the Release Information page. Some of the highlights:

  • Xen HVM support in FreeBSD/amd64 and Xen PV support in FreeBSD/i386 improved
  • ZFS on-disk format updated to version 15
  • aesni(4) driver for Intel AESNI crypto instruction set
  • BIND and OpenSSL updates
  • Gnome updated to 2.32.1
  • KDE updated to 4.5.5
  • Many misc. improvements and bugfixes

You can upgrade your system with the freebsd-update command:

# freebsd-update upgrade -r 8.2-RELEASE
# freebsd-update install
# shutdown -r now
# freebsd-update install

Many thanks to the Release Engineering Team, the many developers, companies and users’ feedback that have made these release possible. @Vasilache Anton Ciprian, thanks for emailing a few days ago about the 8.2 ISO’s being available on some of the servers and bittorrent. I didn’t announce this in case of any show stoppers.

Released: PC-BSD 8.2 (Hubble Edition)

Following the release of FreeBSD 8.2, iXsystems has now released PC-BSD 8.2.

As you will know, PC-BSD closely follows FreeBSD’s release cycle (on which it is based) but makes it easier for use on the desktop. As a sidenote, Dru Lavigne, PC-BSD’s Community Manager, is doing a presentation this weekend at Scale 2011 on how PC-BSD compares to Linux and FreeBSD. This is her presentation outline:


With regards to the release of PC-BSD 8.2 (Hubble Edition), this version contains a number of enhancements and improvements. For a full list of changes, have a look at the changelog.

Some of the notable changes are:

  • FreeBSD 8.2-Release
  • KDE 4.5.5
  • Added ability to select file-system type and encryption during auto-partitioning
  • Able to toggle between MBR/GPT partitioning
  • Various bug fixes to the wireless / network managers

Version 8.2 of PC-BSD is available for download from the mirrors, as well as via torrent from gotbsd.net.

Build your own FreeBSD update server (howto)

This article describes building an internal FreeBSD Update Server.

Experienced users or administrators are often responsible for several machines or environments. They understand the difficult demands and challenges of maintaining such an infrastructure.

Running a FreeBSD Update Server makes it easier to deploy security and software patches to selected test machines before rolling them out to production. It also means a number of systems can be updated from the local network rather than a much slower Internet connection.

This article outlines the steps involved in creating an internal FreeBSD Update Server.

Full article (via, originally published on experts exchange)

What kind of FreeBSD Installer do you like? (Poll)

We wrote about the latest developments with regards to FreeBSD’s default installer (sysinstall).

It would be interesting to see what kind of installer you prefer. GUI or text/ncurses based?

Feel free to leave any comments below.

What kind of FreeBSD installer do you prefer?

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FreeBSD installers. BSDInstall and pc-sysinstall to merge

Most readers here will agree that FreeBSD would benefit from an updated installer with more functionalities. One of many reasons e.g. is support for the Zetabyte File System (ZFS). A number of FreeBSD users even think that FreeBSD can do with a more attractive installer (me included).

I’m aware of the reasons why many FreeBSD users prefer a text-based installer, but I think a GUI installer is nicer. Please don’t start a flame war ;-) Remember, for new users, first impressions count…..

FreeBSD sysinstall

Over the last couple of  years there have been a few projects endeavouring to create a user friendly graphical installer for FreeBSD. As far as I’m aware these have now been discontinued. Two of which are:

Kris Moore, the founder of the PC-BSD Project, saw the need for an alternative installer for his project and created pc-sysinstall, a visually more pleasing installer with more advanced features than FreeBSD’s sysinstall. There’s an article in this month’s BSD Magazine (FreeBSD and ZFS) with some background and technical details of pc-sysinstall.


Last year work was undertaken by iXsystems to port PC-BSD’s graphical pc-sysinstall to a text-based installer as a replacement for the current sysinstall FreeBSD installer: txt-sysinstall, but this hasn’t been worked on for the last nine months. Will Backman has an interview with John Hixson on this: bsdtalk 199.

I was somewhat disappointed when Nathan Whitehorn (nwhitehorn@) announced his BSD Install project. Instead of working with the guys from iXsystems/PC-BSD and improving pc-sysinstall/txt-sysinstall he deciced to create BSD Install to replace FreeBSD’s current installer:

This project started because we have never, in three major releases, shipped an installer on PowerPC capable of installing a booting system without absurd amounts of handholding and use of external tools. This is especially galling when we have tools in the base (gpart, newfs, and tar) fully capable of doing this. As it turns out, by the time you’ve written a shell script to combine these things, you’re well on your way to deciding to write a new installer.

The goal of this project then, was to maximally reuse existing tools and to make the installer a chain of easily modifiable or replaceable components so that future installer-tinkerers will not run away in terror as quickly as I and many others have from sysinstall and libdisk.

PC-BSD pc-sysinstall

Choice and competion are a good thing, but sometimes cooperation towards a common goal is the better option.

Nathan recently emailed (FreeBSD Installer Roadmap) that he is now together with Josh Paetzel and  Warner Losh, both from iXsystems, and it was agreed to merge the BSD Install frontend with the pc-sysinstall backend:

After some discussion with M. Warner Losh and Josh Paetzel of iXsystems, we’ve come up with the following roadmap for an installer for 9.0. Over the next month, we intend to try to adapt bsdinstall as the front-end for the more featureful, but lacking a terminal-compatible user interface, pc-sysinstall. This implies that the user interface and installation flow for the hybrid installer will be extremely similar to what is currently available in bsdinstall, so please continue sending feedback and bug reports on it. What will be different is the backend code, which will allow use of additional features not currently present in bsdinstall, such as ZFS installation.

I’m happy that the two teams/projects are working together now to create the best installer for the upcoming FreeBSD 9.0.

It is my personal opinion, but I think FreeBSD should come with a graphical installer by default. However, when launched there should be an option to exit the GUI and continue with the text based installer for those who prefer this.

As most of you will know there’s also a BSD Installer which is used by pfSenseDragonflyBSD and previously by FreeNAS.

If you want, please take part in the “what FreeBSD Installer do you like” poll.

Virtualbox 4.0.4 for FreeBSD (CFT)

A call for testing has gone out for VirtualBox 4.0.4.  The latest version in ports is 3.2.12 (/usr/ports/emulators/virtualbox-ose) so it’s nice a number of devs working to get this port updated. 4.0.4 is the most recent stable version, released on 17 Feb.

A few of you have probably wondered what happened to our VirtualBox efforts for FreeBSD. Well it took a bit longer then expected and a few problems were found that needed to be resolved first but most of the things are looking fine now and almost all patches have been pushed upstream with 4.0.4 so here we are now.

We will continue to work on VirtualBox for FreeBSD and upstream is also very helpful to us but we could need a few more hands to better keep up with the work and especially improve and fix the Guest Additions. So if you want to help please contact us or have a look at our Todo list.

If you have a spare PC, please let the devs have your feedback.

More info and a list with current developers can be found on: VirtualBox 4.0.4 for FreeBSD

About VirtualBox: VirtualBox is a general-purpose full virtualizer for x86 hardware, targeted at server, desktop and embedded use maintained by Oracle.

“RAIDZilla”, a FreeNAS based, advanced featured NAS appliance

FreeNAS 8 is shaping up nicely (FreeNAS 8.0-BETA available) and developers at iXsystems are putting in a lot of time and work into it. Apart from working on the software side, iXsystems also offers a FreeNAS based appliance, the iX-2120.

I had a chat with Matt Olander, CTO of iXsystems, about a new FreeNAS appliance they’re working on, internally codenamed ‘RAIDZilla’. When launched, it will get a corporate name in line with some of their other products, probably something like iX-NAS XXXX.

“RAIDZilla” is a combination of specially developed hardware running FreeNAS. iXsystems is building an inexpensive, standardised and fast NAS appliance with easy to use management tools. RAIDZilla runs FreeNAS with some closed-source goodies such as like drive failure detection, notification, auto-replacement option and NFS head failover, along with array duplication so both head units can write to the same array.

By providing both the hardware platform and an optimised operating system, iXsystems is able to maximise the appliance’s reliability and speed, as well as to provide a good user experience. iXsystems plans to open-source the closed-coded features in the future.

The big thing about the new iX-NAS, especially enterprises will be interested in this, is that it’s going to be available in Europe as well. A main distributor is getting set up to finish FreeNAS builds in Belgium, and there will be opportunities for VARs (value added resellers) and integrators to sell units at retail price after a channel partner discount and earn additional income providing consultation, setup, and deployment services. If you’re interested, please contact Matt (matt at ixsystems dot com).

There’s a post on the iX blog with an interview between Corey Vixie and Doug White, Senior Test Engineer at iXsystems about RAIDZilla: Doug White on RAIDZilla.

  • What exactly is RAIDZilla?
  • What makes it different than FreeNAS?
  • What does the software platform look like?
  • What about the hardware?
  • Tell me about ‘Head Redundancy’?
  • Speaking of cool features, a little bird mentioned something about Fusion-IO cards being an option
  • So, just how fast is very fast?

I’m looking forward to the launch of this appliance and will let you know when it’s available.