FreeBSD Events (Athens Digital Week, NLLGG)

NLLGG BSD Day (Utrecht, 11 Dec 2010)

The NLLGG (Netherlands Linux Users Group) has organised a BSD Day in Utrecht, the Netherlands, for 11 December. This is the 3rd year running that the Group has organised a BSD Day. More information can be found here (Dutch).

Video Presentation of the FreeBSD Project at Athens Digital Week 2010

Elias Chrisocherias has uploaded 2 videos of his presentation at the Athens Digital Week 2010. As both videos are in Greek, I can’t understand what is being said, though some of the slides give an idea. The interesting thing you’ll notice is the number of attendants, including a number of females!



BSD Events 2011 – call for speakers (FOSDEM, BSDCAN)

Marius Nünnerich has called for speakers for FOSDEM 2011  (5 and 6 Feb 2011)

FOSDEM 2011 will take place February 5-6, 2011 in Brussels, Belgium.
We want to continue the great success of the last years and again we have a booth and a devroom.

Please submit your proposal to me asap. We have a devroom on
saturday this time. Talks will be 45 minutes including discussion (feel free to ask if you want to have a longer/shorter slot).

Every talk is welcome, from internal hacker discussion to real-world examples and presentations about new and shiny features. The talk committee consists of Daniel Seuffert and me.

Please submit your proposals to:

marius [at] nuenneri [dot] ch

and include the following information:

* Your name
* The title of your talk (please be descriptive, as titles will be
listed with ~250 from other projects)
* A short abstract of one to two paragraphs
* A short biography introducing yourself
* Links to related websites/blogs etc.

The deadline for submissions is 20th December 2010. The proposals will be considered by committee. If your proposal has been accepted, you will be informed by email within one week of the submission deadline. [...]

BSD Can 2011 – Call for papers – 11-14 May 2010

BSDCan 2011 will be held 13-14 May, 2011 in Ottawa at the University of Ottawa. It will be preceded by two days of tutorials on 11-12 May.

NOTE: This will be Fri/Sat with tutorials on Wed/Thu.

We are now accepting proposals for talks.

The talks should be designed with a very strong technical content bias. Proposals of a business development or marketing nature are not appropriate for this venue.

If you are doing something interesting with a BSD operating system, please submit a proposal. Whether you are developing a very complex system using BSD as the foundation, or helping others and have a story to tell about how BSD played a role, we want to hear about your experience. People using BSD as a platform for research are also encouraged to submit a proposal. Possible topics include:

  • How we manage a giant installation with respect to handling spam.
  • and/or sysadmin.
  • and/or networking.

From the BSDCan website, the Archives section will allow you to review the wide variety of past BSDCan presentations as further examples.

Both users and developers are encouraged to share their experiences.

The schedule is:

1 Dec 2010 Proposal acceptance begins
19 Jan 2011 Proposal acceptance ends
19 Feb 2011 Confirmation of accepted proposals

Current and future FreeBSD events can be found on my FreeBSD conferences and events calendar (gcal). If you come across any that are missing, let me know.

5 new TCP Congestion Control Algorithms Project (FreeBSD Foundation)

The FreeBSD Foundation has announced it is funding the 5 new TCP Congestion Control Algorithms Project:

“The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce that Swinburne University’s Technology’s Centre for Advanced Internet Architectures has been awarded a grant to implement five new TCP congestion control algorithms in FreeBSD.

Correctly functioning congestion control (CC) is crucial to the efficient operation of the Internet and IP networks in general. CC dynamically balances a flow’s throughput against the inferred impact on the network, lowering throughput to protect the network as required.

The FreeBSD operating system’s TCP stack currently utilizes the defacto standard NewReno loss-based CC algorithm, which has known problems coping with many aspects of modern data networks like lossy or large bandwidth/delay paths. There is significant and ongoing work both in the research community and industry to address CC related problems, with a particular focus on TCP because of its ubiquitous deployment and use.

Swinburne University of Technology’s ongoing work with FreeBSD’s TCP stack and congestion control implementation has progressively matured. This project aims to refine their prototypes and integrate them into FreeBSD.

The project will conclude in January 2011.” (source: freebsdfoundation.blogspot.com)

The five protocols are:

If you’d like to see the Foundation fund more of these sort of projects, why not considering making a (small) donation?

This month I will be donating any affiliate commission I receive from Bordeaux Software (run Windows software on FreeBSD / PC-BSD) to the Foundation. If you’d love to use FreeBSD and/or PC-BSD but need to use Windows software as well, incl Microsoft Office, why not buy a copy of Bordeau ($10)?

Colin Percival will be donating his profits from tarsnap.com this month.

Chromium for FreeBSD – change of port maintainer

Shortly after Google Chrome was released, I was  excited to find out that Ben Laurie was porting Google Chrome/Chromium to FreeBSD. This is in my opinion the best web browser available (I know, it’s subjective). It’s light-weight, secure and extendible.

The only thing that has cast a bit of a shadow on the Chromium porting project was thehybrid licensing model, where paying subscribers have access to the latest builds, and non-paying individuals can download an older/out-of-date version.

In itself there’s nothing wrong with this licensing model, but you’d expect that more with closed source and proprietary software. Chrome/Chromium is free and therefore any ported versions should be free too, IMO, as long as Google’s EULA is adhered to.

Due to some issues a new port (www/ports/chromium) maintainer has been appointed, i.e. Rene Ladan.

“However complete and obstinate disregard to the security vulnerabilities of the version in the ports tree, including refusal to even document them contradicts the idea of maintainership as the community understands it and as it is documented.” (source)

We wish Rene the best and we hope to see Chromium 8 that was released last week ported to FreeBSD (current version in ports is version 6).

kFreeBSD with ZFS, Bordeaux on PC-BSD, benchmarks and pfSense

Debian’s GNU/kFreeBSD Installer will support ZFS

“While Debian GNU/kFreeBSD has supported the ZFS file-system with its FreeBSD-8 kernel, support for installing the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD distribution to a root ZFS file-system will now be possible with the Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” release.

For those unfamiliar with Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, it takes the GNU user-land but runs it atop the FreeBSD kernel rather than Debian GNU/Linux with the Linux kernel. You can still use apt-get and do most anything you would with the Linux-based Debian distribution (aside from different hardware compatibility and other support differences), but instead you’re running the FreeBSD kernel.

While the upstream FreeBSD project doesn’t have an easy root ZFS file-system installation option within FreeBSD 8.0/8.1, this isn’t particularly ground-breaking, as the FreeBSD-based PC-BSD already has ZFS installation support that is quite easy to work.”

Full post on Phoronix: Debian’s GNU/kFreeBSD Installer Will Support ZFS

Review of Running Bordeaux on PC-BSD

Jesse Smith of Distrowatch has used Bordeaux for a week and written up his (mostly positive) experience (feature story):

“The Bordeaux Technology Group is a company specializing in compatibility software. Specifically, they work at making it as easy as possible to run Windows programs on the UNIX family of operating systems. Their Bordeaux tool is built to run on Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris, OpenIndiana and Mac OS X. Bordeaux is, at its heart, a customized build of Wine. They take a recent version of Wine, add some special tools and test their build for compatibility against a group of popular Windows software. They then sell this bundle (along with support) for about US$20 – 25, much less than the typical cost of a Windows license. A few weeks ago I had a chance to chat with Tom, a member of the Bordeaux Technology Group, and he was kind enough to give me a copy of Bordeaux (PC-BSD edition) to test-drive.

The provided PBI package was about 44 MB and it installed without any problems. With the install completed, two icons were added to my desktop and application menu. These new icons were labelled “Bordeaux” and “Cellar Manager”. I launched Bordeaux first and was presented with a new window featuring three tabs along the top. These three tabs are called “Install Applications”, “Manage Wine” and “Unsupported Packages”. At the bottom of the window, regardless of which tab is selected, are two buttons called “Help” and “Install”. Clicking the Help button always opens a browser window to the Bordeaux documentation website. The Install button actually performs different functions depending on which tab is selected.”

Read on for the remainder of the story, and the conclusion: Test-driving Bordeaux 2.0.8

NB, Bordeaux Group has a 50% offer going: Bordeaux 50% off recession busting sale

New benchmarks of OpenSolaris, BSD & Linux

Phoronix has benchmarked the latest OpenSolaris-based distributions (OpenSolaris, OpenIndiana, and Augustiner-Schweinshaxe), compared to PC-BSD, Fedora, and Ubuntu. The Phoronix review concludes:

There you have it, the performance of the latest OpenSolaris distributions against PC-BSD/FreeBSD and two of the most popular Linux distributions. The Fedora and Ubuntu operating systems won most of the tests, but there were a few leads for PC-BSD while the OpenSolaris operating systems just one won test (Local Adaptive Thresholding via GraphicsMagick) at least for our benchmarking selection and workload. If you are using an OpenSolaris-based operating system hopefully you are not using it for a performance critical environment but rather to take advantage of its technical features like DTrace, ZFS (though that is becoming moot with its availability on PC-BSD/FreeBSD and even Linux), etc.

Check out the article for the graphs, benchmark details and hardware used: New benchmarks of Opensolaris, BSD and Linux

Build your own Router (pfSense)

Martin Diers set up pfSense for a new warehouse.

My company is expanding into a warehouse, and so for the first time, I have to setup a WAN. That’s a Wide Area Network, which basically means joining together two or more LANs so everyone can see each other, even if you are across the country.

At my company, I have our local internet router running pfSense on a traditional PC with two network cards. It works just like your home linksys or netgear router. It’s just faster and can handle a lot more traffic. It is also extremely stable. I never have to reboot the thing. You configure it just like your home router: through a web interface

He finishes the article by saying how easy setting up a wlan with pfsense (and cheap), compared to the 90′s:

pfSense has been the best router software I have ever used. It is as capable as anything put out by Cisco or HP, and it is open source. For the cost of the bare hardware, you can have a world-class router that supports many other services such as local DNS resolution, content filtering, bandwidth monitoring, Quality of Service controlls, the list goes on, and you can even have it in an little fanless package.

Read the whole post: Build your own router (trojanbadger.com)

pfSense is a free, open source customized distribution of FreeBSD tailored for use as a firewall and router. In addition to being a powerful, flexible firewalling and routing platform, it includes a long list of related features and a package system allowing further expandability without adding bloat and potential security vulnerabilities to the base distribution.”

Bjoern Zeeb receives 2nd Itojun Service Award

Bjoern Zeeb received the second Itojun Service Award at he IETF 79 meeting in Beijing last month.

Bjoern A. Zeeb, a FreeBSD Developer, received the award for his dedicated work to make significant improvements in open source implementations of IPv6. IPv6 is the next generation of Internet protocol that will help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet as a platform for innovation.

First awarded last year, the Itojun Service Award honours the memory of Dr. Jun-ichiro “itojun” Hagino, who passed away in 2007, aged just 37. The award, established by the friends of itojun and administered by the Internet Society (ISOC), recognises and commemorates the extraordinary dedication exercised by itojun over the course of IPv6 development.

“For many years, Bjoern has been a committed champion of, and contributor to, implementing IPv6 in open source operating systems used in servers, desktops, and embedded computer platforms, including those used by some of the busiest websites in the world,”

said Jun Murai of the Itojun Service Award committee and Founder of the WIDE Project.

“On behalf of the Itojun Service Award committee, I am extremely pleased to present this award to Bjoern for his outstanding work in support of IPv6 development and deployment.”

The Itojun Service Award is focused on pragmatic contributions to developing and deploying IPv6 in the spirit of serving the Internet. The award, expected to be presented annually, includes a presentation crystal, a US$3,000 honorarium, and a travel grant.

“This is a great honour, and I would like to thank the people who recommended me for the award and the committee for believing my work was valuable. I never met Itojun but he was one of the people helping me, and I have the highest respect for his massive foundational work,”

said Bjoern A. Zeeb.

“As the Internet community works to roll out IPv6 to more and more people all around the globe, we also need to help others–developers, businesses, and users–understand and use the new Internet protocols so that the vision Itojun was working so hard for comes true.”

Each Internet-connected device uses an IP address and, with the number of Internet-connected devices growing rapidly, the supply of unallocated IPv4 addresses is expected to be exhausted within the next year. To help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet, IPv6 provides a huge increase in the number of available addresses. And, while the technical foundations of IPv6 are well established, significant work remains to expand the deployment and use of IPv6.

IPv6 was developed within the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Internet’s premier standards-making body responsible for the development of protocols used in IP-based networks. IETF participants represent an international community of network designers, operators, vendors, and researchers involved in the technical operation of the Internet and the continuing evolution of Internet architecture. More information on the Itojun Service Award is available at: http://www.isoc.org/itojun

Source: ISOC monthly newsletter (Nov 2010)

FreeBSD Security Advisory (openssl)

The FreeBSD Security Team has identified a security bug in openssl:

I. Background

FreeBSD includes software from the OpenSSL Project. The OpenSSL Project is a collaborative effort to develop a robust, commercial-grade, full-featured Open Source toolkit implementing the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL v2/v3) and Transport Layer Security (TLS v1) protocols as well as a full-strength general purpose cryptography library.

II. Problem Description

A race condition exists in the OpenSSL TLS server extension code parsing when used in a multi-threaded application, which uses OpenSSL’s internal caching mechanism. The race condition can lead to a buffer overflow.

A double free exists in the SSL client ECDH handling code, when processing specially crafted public keys with invalid prime numbers.

III. Impact

For affected server applications, an attacker may be able to utilize the buffer overflow to crash the application or potentially run arbitrary code with the privileges of the application.

It may be possible to cause a DoS or potentially execute arbitrary in the context of the user connection to a malicious SSL server.

To find out more about the impact, a work-around and solution, check out the advisory page: FreeBSD Security Advisory (openssl)

FreeBSD Foundation EOY fund-raise drive

The FreeBSD Foundation has kicked off its annual end-of-year fund-raise drive, and is calling happy (Free)BSD users make a small donation to help the FreeBSD Project fund new initiatives, sponsor FreeBSD Conferences, grant travel grants etc.

The Foundation has received some large (corporate) donations already, but the number of last year’s individual donations hasn’t been matched yet. More than half of the £350k goal has been given. If you want and can help, you can donate here (I am not affiliated with the FreeBSD Foundation).

FreeBSD Foundation president Justin Gibbs writes:

As the year is winding down I’m writing this note to remind you of the motivation behind the FreeBSD Foundation’s work, its benefits to you, and to ask for your financial assistance in making our work possible.

Ten years ago, I created the FreeBSD Foundation to repay a debt I owe to the FreeBSD project. While working on FreeBSD I learned the fundamentals of sound software design, how to successfully manage a large code base, and experienced the challenges of release engineering. Beyond the benefits of this education, FreeBSD has provided a robust platform that has allowed me to build several successful commercial products while being well paid to work on an operating system I love.

Today, through my volunteer work with the FreeBSD Foundation, I’m still paying down this debt.

This year, despite the slow pace of the economic recovery, the FreeBSD Foundation has an impressive list of accomplishments:

Provided $100,000 in grants for projects that improve FreeBSD in the areas of:

  • DTrace support
  • High availability storage
  • Enhanced SNMP reporting
  • Virtualization and resource partitioning
  • Embedded device support
  • Networking stack improvements

Allocated $50,000 for equipment to enhance FreeBSD project infrastructure.

Sponsored 8 FreeBSD related conferences.

Funded 16 travel grants giving increased community and developer access to conferences.

Provided legal support to the FreeBSD project.

How do our activities benefit you? If you are a company using FreeBSD, our work to strengthen the FreeBSD community ensures the continued viability of FreeBSD and a large pool of developers to tap into. If you are an end user, our work brings you new features and access to conferences. And if you are a FreeBSD developer, the FreeBSD Foundation is providing the resources needed to make your next innovation possible.

The FreeBSD project thrives through the hard work of our community, but it also requires financial backing. This year we set a fund-raising goal of $350,000. We are pleased to report that we are half way there, but we need your help to reach our goal. Every donation, no matter its size, helps to make our work possible. As a non-profit with very low overhead, your donation is the best way to invest in FreeBSD. Please make that investment today.

Source: FreeBSD Foundation blog