Miscelaneous (Free)BSD news and links (Week 2)

I End of Life Announcement for PC-BSD 7.x

With the release of version 8.2 just around the corner, and PC-BSD 9.0 slated for later this year, we will be stopping the production of new packages / PBIs for the PC-BSD 7.x series in the near future: End of Life Announcement for PC-BSD 7.x

II Required: Senior FreeBSD/UNIX/Linux Administrator

You might be our next Sr. Systems Engineer: Senior FreeBSD/UNIX/Linux Administrator

III FreeBSD: Virtual Network Switch

In the previous post, I have mentioned about I’m going to cover Open vSwitch and Vde implementation. However I think it is also interesting to cover how you can setup virtual switch with FreeBSD native system. As we all know bridging is actually software switching, therefore we can make use of bridge interface to achieve this. I will explain the 6 ports virtual network switch setup that is illustrated in the diagram below: FreeBSD: Virtual Network Switch

IV Installing pfSense on an Alix.6e1

The ALIX.6e1 hardware platform:

2 10/100 LAN / 1 miniPCI / 1 miniPCI Express / AMD LX800 / 256 MB / 2 USB / DB9 serial port / CF Card slot / Board size: 6 x 6 : Installing pfSense on an Alix.6e1

Available: FreeBSD 8.2-RC2

Ken Smith has announced the availability of FreeBSD 8.2-RC2. This is the second iteration of Release Candidates which will lead to 8.2-RELEASE.

Check out the updated release schedule and yet-to-completed tasks on the FreeBSD wiki.

The second Release Candidate for the FreeBSD 8.2 release cycle is now available. Initial testing of the 7.4-RC2 install images turned up an issue with the pre-built packages that will take a few more days to address. For this build only the amd64, i386, pc98, and sparc64 architectures are available.

Related to the upcoming release of FreeBSD 8.2 is the ports freeze: Ports Feature Freeze for 7.4 and 8.

FreeBSD Foundation requesting project proposals (2011)

The FreeBSD Foundation has requested proposals for potential funding. If you have any ideas how you can FreeBSD can be improved in 2011, why not submit you idea. In case you have no ideas but don’t mind getting paid for FreeBSD Development, have a look at the FreeBSD list of projects and ideas for volunteers.

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce we are soliciting the submission of proposals (submission document) for work relating to any of the major subsystems or infrastructure within the FreeBSD operating system. Proposals will be evaluated based on desirability, technical merit and cost-effectiveness.

(Free)BSD miscelaneous links and news (week 1)

I. The Perfect Database Server: Firebird 2.5 And FreeBSD 8.1

Here is the guide on installing Firebird 2.5 from FreeBSD 8.1 Ports and creating your first test database; also we show you how to install Flamerobin GUI (administration tool) and the PHP driver for it: The perfect database server: Firebird 2.5 and FreeBSD 8.1

II. Can DragonFlyBSD’s HAMMER Compete With Btrfs, ZFS?

The most common Linux file-systems we talk about at Phoronix are of course Btrfs and EXT4 while the ZFS file-system, which is available on Linux as a FUSE (user-space) module or via a recent kernel module port, gets mentioned a fair amount too. When it comes to the FreeBSD and PC-BSD operating systems, ZFS is looked upon as the superior, next-generation option that is available to BSD users. However, with the DragonFlyBSD operating system there is another option: HAMMER. In this article we are seeing how the performance of this original creation within the DragonFlyBSD project competes with ZFS, UFS, EXT3, EXT4, and Btrfs.

HAMMER is a file-system created by the DragonFlyBSD developers themselves and is the default choice when installing this BSD operating system, but UFS remains a choice too. The one sentence description about this file-system is that “[HAMMER] provides instant crash recovery, multi-volume file systems, integrity checking, fine grained history/undo, networked mirroring, and historical snapshots.” HAMMER uses no fsck, can be sized up to one Exabyte, supports up to 256 volumes of four petabytes in size, coarse-grained history provided by snapshots with up to sixty days history, live snapshot access, and data/meta-data is CRC-checked. Like Btrfs, HAMMER snapshots can be taken at any time, can be accessed live, and boasts a similar set of features. Other HAMMER file-system features include the ability to split it up into multiple pseudo file-systems, there is support for back-up pseudo file-systems, NFS-exportable snapshots, and there is support for slave-to-slave mirroring streams: Can DragonFlyBSD’s HAMMER Compete With Btrfs, ZFS?

Matt Dillon’s, DragonFlyBSD’s project founder, thoughts on the test: HAMMER Benchmark Fun

III. Get Linux and FreeBSD hardware info with guide to commands

Switching between open source OSs can sometimes be confusing, since they may have different ways of doing things. A common task that may confuse some users when switching systems is getting hardware information. In the case of Linux-based OSs and FreeBSD, the following cheat sheet for figuring out how to do the same things on two different systems can ease some of the pain: Linux vs FreeBSD cheat sheet.

IV. Cost Optimization Through Open Source Software (iXsystems)

The lead article in this month’s edition of the Open Source Business Resource was contributed by iXsystems. It describes some of the business reasons behind the company’s choice to use only FreeBSD and PC-BSD systems in its own infrastructure and provides a cost/savings comparison for both software and maintenance costs. It also contains some good references and percentages if you’re looking for something to show your manager (via)

V. Creating an LVM-backed FreeBSD DomU in a Linux Dom0

As the topic suggests we’re going to play with Xen and set up a FreeBSD DomU inside a Linux Dom0.

FreeBSD on Sony Playstation 3 (PS3)

Following reports (e.g. Hackers bust PS3 DRM wide open with private key hack)  that hackers had found a way to obtain Sony PlayStation 3‘s private cryptography key, it was only a matter of time of FreeBSD would be run on Sony’s latest gaming station.

The latest hack to come out of the Chaos Computer Club (CCC) Congress being held in Berlin comes from the fail0verflow hacking squad, who say they’ve found a way to obtain the PS3′s private cryptography key, which is used to sign code.

With an exploit of this type, people could sign, and thus run any PS3 program. The system would then run it as though it were a valid PS3 game, and firmware upgrades won’t be able to stop it, either.

In fact, The team claims: “We only started looking at the PS3 after Other OS was killed.” OtherOS was a feature available in the first versions of the PS3. It allowed other operating systems, such as Linux or FreeBSD, to be installed on the system.

One week after the hack, FreeBSD is running indeed on PS3. There are still a few problems and rough edges, but they should be ironed out when FreeBSD 9.0 is released:

Yesterday, I imported support for the Sony Playstation 3 into our 64-bit PowerPC port, expanding our game console support into the current generation. There are still a few rough edges due to missing hardware support, but the machine boots and runs FreeBSD stably. These rough edges should be smoothed out in time for the 9.0 release.

For further instructions, check out the announcement post: Playstation 3 support now in HEAD

Top 15 Posts and Search Terms in 2010

I thought I’d share the 15 most popular posts of 2010.

Interestingly, people were looking for ways to use FreeBSD as a desktop operating system: posts on FreeNAS (4) and Google Chrome (3)  and “live systems” (2) were very popular:

  1. FreeBSD will continue supporting ZFS
  2. Install FreeBSD 8.0 from USB memory stick
  3. Differences between BSD and Linux
  4. Flash 9 for FreeBSD 7.1 (howto)
  5. FreeNAS Tutorials
  6. Chromium (Google Chrome) for FreeBSD
  7. Running Google Chrome on FreeBSD
  8. Creating a Network Attached Storage VMware using FreeNAS
  9. FreeNAS supports Bittorrent
  10. DesktopBSD Live USB stick
  11. Embedded FreeBSD systems
  12. UNIX history family tree
  13. FreeNAS 0.8 Roadmap
  14. Open source NAS device using FreeNAS and iSCSI drives (howtos & video)
  15. Google Chrome on FreeBSD 7.0 (howto)

FreeNAS is in good shape and hopefully FreeNAS 8.0 will be with us soon. Unfortunately, there’s no native FreeBSD Flash player, but with the world moving to (or are we pushed to?) using HTML5, this should be no problem. A new maintainer is now looking after the Chromium (Google Chrome) port, so a more up-to-date version (10?) will be released soon.

A similar pattern can be seen from Google search terms when landing on freebsdnews.net:

  1. freebsd
  2. freebsd news
  3. freebsd vs linux
  4. freenas vmware
  5. bsd news
  6. freenas 0.8
  7. chrome freebsd
  8. freebsd flash
  9. google chrome freebsd
  10. freenas bittorrent
  11. freebsd live usb
  12. freebsd usb install
  13. freebsd chrome
  14. freebsd embedded
  15. install freebsd from usb

FreeBSD quick news and links (week 52)

Below some links to news articles and blog posts relating to FreeBSD, it’s development, howto’s etc, and other interesting bits and bops connected with the FreeBSD operating system.

1. Automatic Install with FreeBSD 64-bit on RootBSD.

All new RootBSD orders are now able to select FreeBSD 8.1-RELEASE 64-bit as an option in the order form. Although manual install is still an option, this selection will prompt our new automated installer for FreeBSD 64-bit that allows your VPS to be set up in a matter of minutes like our current 32-bit offering once your order is approved. FreeBSD 32-bit is still recommended for most users.

2. FreeBSD Foundation fund raising drive (2010)

This is a last plea from the FreeBSD Foundaion for 2010 donations. Can you help?

3. FreeBSD on Amazon EC2

FreeBSD 9.0 headed to the cloud as 8.2 nears release (internetnews.com). Related to this is Collin’s updated FreeBSD on Amazon’s EC2 FAQ

4. GhostBSD – Preview for the next release.

New Logo, new theme for GhostBSD 2.0 and plans to make it faster.

5. Running Pinta on FreeBSD (rhyous.com - howto).

Pinta is a drawing/editing program modeled after Paint.NET. It’s goal is to provide a simplified alternative to GIMP for casual users. It is currently early in development.

6. ZFS in Debian

ZFS is coming to Debian! Of course, it will be arriving there via the FreeBSD kernel. ZFS v28 s imminent in FreeBSD. Testers need to check out the new patch (via Ivan Voras’ blog).

7. Oracle highligts Solaris UNIX Plans

The OS will feature next-generation networking capabilities for scalability and performance, said John Fowler, Oracle executive vice president of systems, at a company event in Santa Clara, Calif. “It’s a complete reworking of [the] enterprise OS,” he said. Oracle took over Solaris when the company acquired Sun Microsystems early this year.

Full post:  Oracle highlights Solaris UNIX plans (computerworld.com)

Talking about UNIX, Novell has moved to quell growing concerns that it has sold Linux out to Microsoft as part of its Attachmate deal: Novell keeps Unix copyrights from Microsoft

8. FreeBSD: High Performance Packet Capture
Summary and background information: FreeBSD: High Performance Packet Capture

9. Marketing Assistant for Open Source Hardware Manufacturer

Ever wanted to work for a FreeBSD focused company? If ‘Marketing’ is your thing and you’re at ‘assistant level’, have a look at this vacancy with iXsystems: Marketing Assistant for Open Source Hardware Manufacturer

iXsystems is looking for a Marketing Assistant with developed writing skills and the ability to do some digital graphic work as well. The ideal candidate is both creative and hardworking with the ability to develop innovative ideas for ads and print related to open source servers and software. Applicants will need to be able to work five days a week from 10 am – 6pm. Some flex time is permitted, but minimum amount of time required in the office is 3 full days per week.

10. Trying PC-BSD 8.2-BETA2 (taosecurity). Richard Bejtlich took PC-BSD 8.2-BETA2 for a spin. His feedback here.

11. KDE Software Compilation 4.4.5 in ports