Bjoern Zeeb receives 2nd Itojun Service Award

Bjoern Zeeb received the second Itojun Service Award at he IETF 79 meeting in Beijing last month.

Bjoern A. Zeeb, a FreeBSD Developer, received the award for his dedicated work to make significant improvements in open source implementations of IPv6. IPv6 is the next generation of Internet protocol that will help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet as a platform for innovation.

First awarded last year, the Itojun Service Award honours the memory of Dr. Jun-ichiro “itojun” Hagino, who passed away in 2007, aged just 37. The award, established by the friends of itojun and administered by the Internet Society (ISOC), recognises and commemorates the extraordinary dedication exercised by itojun over the course of IPv6 development.

“For many years, Bjoern has been a committed champion of, and contributor to, implementing IPv6 in open source operating systems used in servers, desktops, and embedded computer platforms, including those used by some of the busiest websites in the world,”

said Jun Murai of the Itojun Service Award committee and Founder of the WIDE Project.

“On behalf of the Itojun Service Award committee, I am extremely pleased to present this award to Bjoern for his outstanding work in support of IPv6 development and deployment.”

The Itojun Service Award is focused on pragmatic contributions to developing and deploying IPv6 in the spirit of serving the Internet. The award, expected to be presented annually, includes a presentation crystal, a US$3,000 honorarium, and a travel grant.

“This is a great honour, and I would like to thank the people who recommended me for the award and the committee for believing my work was valuable. I never met Itojun but he was one of the people helping me, and I have the highest respect for his massive foundational work,”

said Bjoern A. Zeeb.

“As the Internet community works to roll out IPv6 to more and more people all around the globe, we also need to help others–developers, businesses, and users–understand and use the new Internet protocols so that the vision Itojun was working so hard for comes true.”

Each Internet-connected device uses an IP address and, with the number of Internet-connected devices growing rapidly, the supply of unallocated IPv4 addresses is expected to be exhausted within the next year. To help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet, IPv6 provides a huge increase in the number of available addresses. And, while the technical foundations of IPv6 are well established, significant work remains to expand the deployment and use of IPv6.

IPv6 was developed within the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the Internet’s premier standards-making body responsible for the development of protocols used in IP-based networks. IETF participants represent an international community of network designers, operators, vendors, and researchers involved in the technical operation of the Internet and the continuing evolution of Internet architecture. More information on the Itojun Service Award is available at: http://www.isoc.org/itojun

Source: ISOC monthly newsletter (Nov 2010)

FreeBSD Security Advisory (openssl)

The FreeBSD Security Team has identified a security bug in openssl:

I. Background

FreeBSD includes software from the OpenSSL Project. The OpenSSL Project is a collaborative effort to develop a robust, commercial-grade, full-featured Open Source toolkit implementing the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL v2/v3) and Transport Layer Security (TLS v1) protocols as well as a full-strength general purpose cryptography library.

II. Problem Description

A race condition exists in the OpenSSL TLS server extension code parsing when used in a multi-threaded application, which uses OpenSSL’s internal caching mechanism. The race condition can lead to a buffer overflow.

A double free exists in the SSL client ECDH handling code, when processing specially crafted public keys with invalid prime numbers.

III. Impact

For affected server applications, an attacker may be able to utilize the buffer overflow to crash the application or potentially run arbitrary code with the privileges of the application.

It may be possible to cause a DoS or potentially execute arbitrary in the context of the user connection to a malicious SSL server.

To find out more about the impact, a work-around and solution, check out the advisory page: FreeBSD Security Advisory (openssl)

FreeBSD Foundation EOY fund-raise drive

The FreeBSD Foundation has kicked off its annual end-of-year fund-raise drive, and is calling happy (Free)BSD users make a small donation to help the FreeBSD Project fund new initiatives, sponsor FreeBSD Conferences, grant travel grants etc.

The Foundation has received some large (corporate) donations already, but the number of last year’s individual donations hasn’t been matched yet. More than half of the £350k goal has been given. If you want and can help, you can donate here (I am not affiliated with the FreeBSD Foundation).

FreeBSD Foundation president Justin Gibbs writes:

As the year is winding down I’m writing this note to remind you of the motivation behind the FreeBSD Foundation’s work, its benefits to you, and to ask for your financial assistance in making our work possible.

Ten years ago, I created the FreeBSD Foundation to repay a debt I owe to the FreeBSD project. While working on FreeBSD I learned the fundamentals of sound software design, how to successfully manage a large code base, and experienced the challenges of release engineering. Beyond the benefits of this education, FreeBSD has provided a robust platform that has allowed me to build several successful commercial products while being well paid to work on an operating system I love.

Today, through my volunteer work with the FreeBSD Foundation, I’m still paying down this debt.

This year, despite the slow pace of the economic recovery, the FreeBSD Foundation has an impressive list of accomplishments:

Provided $100,000 in grants for projects that improve FreeBSD in the areas of:

  • DTrace support
  • High availability storage
  • Enhanced SNMP reporting
  • Virtualization and resource partitioning
  • Embedded device support
  • Networking stack improvements

Allocated $50,000 for equipment to enhance FreeBSD project infrastructure.

Sponsored 8 FreeBSD related conferences.

Funded 16 travel grants giving increased community and developer access to conferences.

Provided legal support to the FreeBSD project.

How do our activities benefit you? If you are a company using FreeBSD, our work to strengthen the FreeBSD community ensures the continued viability of FreeBSD and a large pool of developers to tap into. If you are an end user, our work brings you new features and access to conferences. And if you are a FreeBSD developer, the FreeBSD Foundation is providing the resources needed to make your next innovation possible.

The FreeBSD project thrives through the hard work of our community, but it also requires financial backing. This year we set a fund-raising goal of $350,000. We are pleased to report that we are half way there, but we need your help to reach our goal. Every donation, no matter its size, helps to make our work possible. As a non-profit with very low overhead, your donation is the best way to invest in FreeBSD. Please make that investment today.

Source: FreeBSD Foundation blog

FreeBSD Security Advisory (pseudofs)

The FreeBSD Security Team has identified a little bug in FreeBSD with speudofs:

I. Background

pseudofs offers an abstract API for pseudo file systems which is utilized by procfs(5) and linprocfs(5). It provides generic file system services such as ACLs, extended attributes which interface with VFS and which are otherwise onerous to implement. This enables pseudo file system authors to add this functionality to their file systems with minimal effort.

II. Problem Description

The pfs_getextattr(9) function, used by pseudofs for handling extended attributes, attempts to unlock a mutex which was not previously locked.

To find out more about the impact, a work-around and solution, check out the advisory page:

FreeBSD Security Advisory (pseudofs)

NYI Sponsors NYCBSDCon 2010

New York Internet (NYI) is sponsoring NYCBSDCon 2010 which is taking place this weekend. NYCBSDCon is a bi-annual BSD conference held at Manhattan’s prestigious Cooper Union.

NYI has a long history of supporting open source projects, particularly the BSDs. It has sponsored NYCBSDCon since its inception in 2005, as well as recently announcing that it now oversees the day-to-day hosting operations of the East Coast U.S. mirror for the FreeBSD Foundation, a deployment consisting of more than 23,000 pieces of Project software.

“NYI has been with us since the beginning. Their unflagging enthusiasm, along with their operational precision and technical intelligence, have been invaluable to the growth of this community in the New York area. If ticket sales are any indication, we expect NYCBSDCon 2010 to be our most successful to-date.”

said George Rosamond, an organizer of NYCBSDCon 2010.

“NYCBSDCon is one of the most important events on our calendar,” added Phillip Koblence, VP Operations, NYI. “Not only is it an excellent opportunity to stay current with the latest developments in BSD, it also allows us to maintain direct, strategic ties with the thought-leaders of a community that has contributed so much to the advancement of open source software.”

NYCBSDCon 2010 aims to build on the success of past events, with a wide array of speakers and topics and an exciting and diverse crowd representing all current BSD projects. Topics will include IPv6, pfSense, PC-Sysinstall and LDAP.

Continue reading

November 2010 – a month of FreeBSD conferences

Last weekend MeetBSD 2010 took place in California. If you were not able to attend or if you want to ‘see’ the conference again, check out Will Backman pictures and the two videos he took (day 1, day 2). Some of the presentation slides are available too.

LISA 2010 will take place from November 10–11 in San Jose, CA. PC-BSD will be represented.

The bi-annual NYCBSDCon will be held 12-14 November. Check out the to-be-held presentations.

BSD-Day 2010 will be held in Budapest (Hungary) at Eötvös Loránd University on 20 November.

 

 

Of EoL, GSoC, paid development and why I love UNIX

FreeBSD 6.4 and 8.0 EoLs coming soon

On November 30th, FreeBSD 6.4 and FreeBSD 8.0 will have reached their End of Life and will no longer be supported by the FreeBSD Security Team. Since FreeBSD 6.4 is the last remaining supported release from the FreeBSD 6.x stable branch, support for the FreeBSD 6.x stable branch will also cease at the same point. Users of either of these FreeBSD releases are strongly encouraged to upgrade to either FreeBSD 7.3 or FreeBSD 8.1 before that date.

The FreeBSD Ports Management Team wishes to remind users that November 30 is also the end of support for the Ports Collection for both FreeBSD 6.4 RELEASE and the FreeBSD 6.x STABLE branch. Neither the infrastructure nor individual ports are guaranteed to work on these FreeBSD versions after that date. A CVS tag will be created for users who cannot upgrade for some reason, at which time these users are advised to stop tracking the latest ports CVS repository and use the RELEASE_6_EOL tag instead. (source)

FreeBSD at GSoC Mentor Summit

As in previous years, Google held a “Mentor Summit” to bring together representatives from the open source organizations that participated in the Google Summer of Code to share experiences of what worked, what didn’t, and generally learn from each other about shepherding students through the program. The mentor summit is always run Unconference-style and it is a great opportunity to meet, learn, and socialize with the many other open source organization… continues (Murray’s FreeBSD Notes)

FreeBSD Will Pay for Some KMS, GEM Love

“The good news, however, is that the FreeBSD Foundation is willing to finance a developer to work on bringing kernel mode-setting and Graphics Execution Manager support over to the FreeBSD kernel.”

Source & full story: FreeBSD Will Pay for Some KMS, GEM Love (phoronix.com)

Why I Love Unix

I love Unix because of all the wonderful things that I can do on the command line. When I first used Unix in 1983, it was love on first sight. With a list of the most basic commands by my side, I quickly discovered how much I could accomplish with several command strings strung together. Unix was nothing like what I’d been using up to that point in my brief data processing career. It was clever, modular and logical. With tools like grep and languages like awk, it was quite a bit of fun to discover how easily I could make the system do my bid. My ability to capture sequences of commands easily into scripts made it possible for me to encapsulate my clever commands, even share them with coworkers. The Unix culture seemed innovative, inviting my participation in creating an environment that really worked for me.

Full blog post: Why I love UNIX (itworld.com)

Other BSD related news

FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Jul – Sep 2010)

Another quarter, another FreeBSD status report: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Jul – Sep 2010).

With 55 entries, this is the longest report so far, and it’s a good indication of how FreeBSD is thriving and how the community is involved in its development.

Table of contents:

Google Summer of Code

Projects

FreeBSD Team Reports

Network Infrastructure

Kernel

Documentation

Userland Programs

Architectures

Ports

Miscellaneous

Read the report in its entirety: FreeBSD Quarterly Status Report (Jul – Sep 2010)