FreeBSD Events Update (Ohio LinuxFest, EuroBSDCon, MeetBSD)

Ohio LinuxFest

Ohio LinuxFest will be taking place from today (10-12 Sep in Ohio). I’m aware of the following FreeBSD related companies and projects that will be respresented: the FreeBSD Foundation, iXsystems, PC-BSD and BSD Certification. If you know of any other ones, please leave a comment below.

The eighth annual Ohio LinuxFest will be held on September 10-12, 2010 at the Greater Columbus Convention Center in downtown Columbus, Ohio. Hosting authoritative speakers and a large expo, the Ohio LinuxFest welcomes all Free and Open Source Software professionals, enthusiasts, and everyone interested in learning more about Free and Open Source Software.

Dru Lavigne will be doing a presentation titled PC-BSD: An Easy to Use BSD Desktop (slideshare available)

EuroBSDCon 2010 (Accepted Talks)

The following talks will be taking place at EuroBSDCon 2010 (8-10 October, Karlsruhe (Germany)):

MeetBSD 2010 (California)

This conference will be held  5-6 November 2010 Mountain View, California, USA)

MeetBSD 2010 features a community-driven discussion format that gives great minds from the BSD and open source communities the opportunity to share ideas. Discussions in the form of breakout sessions will provide a forum for a variety of open source development topics. Lightning talks will allow attendees to share the status of their BSD projects quickly with other community members, while stimulating conversation. A handful of selected speakers will also take part in the event, delivering information on a number of BSD platforms (source).

FreeBSD 6.4 and 8.0 End of Life

On November 30th, FreeBSD 6.4 and FreeBSD 8.0 will have reached their End of Life and will no longer be supported by the FreeBSD Security Team. Since FreeBSD 6.4 is the last remaining supported release from the FreeBSD 6.x stable branch, support for the FreeBSD 6.x stable branch will also cease at the same point. Users of either of these FreeBSD releases are strongly encouraged to upgrade to either FreeBSD 7.3 or FreeBSD 8.1 before that date.

The FreeBSD Ports Management Team wishes to remind users that November 30 is also the end of support for the Ports Collection for both FreeBSD 6.4 RELEASE and the FreeBSD 6.x STABLE branch. Neither the infrastructure nor individual ports are guaranteed to work on these FreeBSD versions after that date. A CVS tag will be created for users who cannot upgrade for some reason, at which time these users are advised to stop tracking the latest ports CVS repository and use the RELEASE_6_EOL tag instead (source)

Capsicum Presentation at Usenix Security 2010

Robert Watson’s Capsicum presentation at Usenix Security is available as MP4.

Capsicum is a lightweight operating system capability and sandbox framework planned for inclusion in FreeBSD 9. Capsicum extends, rather than replaces, UNIX APIs, providing new kernel primitives (sandboxed capability mode and capabilities) and a userspace sandbox API. These tools support compartmentalisation of monolithic UNIX applications into logical applications, an increasingly common goal supported poorly by discretionary and mandatory access control. We demonstrate our approach by adapting core FreeBSD utilities and Google’s Chromium web browser to use Capsicum primitives, and compare the complexity and robustness of Capsicum with other sandboxing techniques.

FreeBSD Events and Conference Calendar

These and other dates can be found in my FreeBSD Events and Conferences Calender (gcal).

FreeBSD quick news and links (week 35)

Some FreeBSD related links and updates below:

New NVidia FreeBSD drivers 256.53

NVidia has updated its graphics drivers for FreeBSD. Some of the changes are:

  • Fixed a bug that prevented XvMC from initializing in most cases.
  • Added support for xorg-server video driver ABI version 8, which will be included in the upcoming xorg-server-1.9 series of releases.
  • Fixed a bug that caused extremely slow rendering of OpenGL applications on X screens other than screen 0 when using a compositing manager.
  • Fixed a regression introduced after 256.35 that caused stability problems on GPUs such as GeForce GT 240.
  • Fixed a slow kernel virtual address space leak observed whenstarting and stopping OpenGL, CUDA, or VDPAU applications.
  • Fixed a bug that left the system susceptible to hangs when running two or more VDPAU applications simultaneously.

BSD License Generator

One shouldn’t have to change too much text when adapting the BSD license, but for the lazy there a BSD License Generator.

Benchmarking HAProxy – Ubuntu vs FreeBSD

“HAProxy on Ubuntu, or HAProxy on FreeBSD? I couldn’t find any real benchmarks comparing the two out in the wild, so I decided to do my own.”

More: Benchmarking HAProxy – Ubuntu vs FreeBSD

Installing pfSense on a Nokia IP120 firewall

“I was recently toying with an old Nokia IP120 firewall and discovered that pfSense would run quite well on this old hardware.”

Here’s how to do it: Installing pfSense on a Nokia IP120 firewall

FreeBSD Stable Release Install Guide

There’s already the excellent FreeBSD Handbook, but here and there you can find other useful guides, for instance the FreeBSD Stable Release Install Guide.

Up to date, Step by Step, How-To, Instructional Guide to Installing FreeBSD from scratch, Specifically written with background information covering the why and how the different components are used together to create a home or small enterprise network for the new-be and inexperienced FreeBSD computer hobbyist. Not a General reference type of document, but a true learning aid containing details unique to the stable version of FreeBSD your installing: a1poweruser.com

The history of Unix on the PC: Exploring lesser-known variants

“When someone discusses the Unix operating system on a PC, many modern computer users think of Linux, a Unix work-alike first released by Linus Torvalds in 1991. Linux is a relative newcomer to the field; Unix and Unix-like operating systems have been released for Intel x86-based systems as far back as 1979. This article covers some lesser-known Unix variants for IBM PC-compatible systems, both those that survive today and the ones that were not long-lived or commercially successful:

The history of Unix on the PC: Exploring lesser-known variants

FreeBSD will continue supporting ZFS

OpenSolaris may be dead now; its advanced techologies such as the ZFS file system continue to live on in FreeBSD.

FreeBSD Developer Pawel Jakub Dawidek confirmed that he is preparing a port of the OpenSolaris ZFS v28 file-system.

Some of the new features included in v28 are:

  • Data deduplication
  • Triple parity RAIDZ (RAIDZ3)
  • zfs diff
  • zpool split
  • Snapshot holds
  • zpool import -F
  • continue to work on ZFS

Instructions on how to test the latest patch can be found on the mailinglist.

Martin Matuska has issued two calls for testers to try out his improvements to the ZFS code.

Pawel confirmed the commitment of the FreeBSD Project to ZFS:

… a message we, as the FreeBSD project, would like to send to our users: Eventhough OpenSolaris is dead, the ZFS file system is going to stay in FreeBSD. At this point we have quite a few developers involved in ZFS on FreeBSD as well as serveral companies.

Should OpenSolaris users consider moving to FreeBSD?

OpenSolaris has been in troubled waters after Oracle acquired Sun, the corporate sponsor of the OpenSolaris Project. The OpenSolaris operating system is a descendent of the UNIX System V Release 4 (SVR4) codebase, and OpenSolaris is was the name of the project initiated by Sun to build a developer and user community around the software.

A few months passed since the acquisition, but Oracle wasn’t communicating with the OpenSolaris Governing Board (OGB) about its plans for OpenSolaris’ future. The OGB set an ultimatum. A few weeks later an email from Oracle to its employees surfaced, making it clear that Oracle had no interest in keeping OpenSolaris going. After the deadline passed, the OGB resigned on 23 August 2010.

Does this mean that openSolaris is dead? Well, the source code is open and available, but there’s now no company behind the project to sponsor it and steer it in the right direction. Unless there’s somebody very motivated or a company with a special interest in OpenSolaris, the operating system will probably die a slow death. Maintaining and further developing a project like OpenSolaris without developers and without community, won’t be very rewarding.

During the time of unrest a group of former OpenSolaris developers decided to fork the distribution, and now development of an OpenSolaris based OS continues under a new project called Illumos.

With OpenSolaris being left to die, and IllumOS still being very young, should OpenSolaris users and developers not start looking for another mature operating system to use and develop for, instead of forking? An operating system that’s in a way similar? An advanced operating system that’s independent from any commercially driven owners?

FreeBSD has benefited from and ported some of OpenSolaris’ advanced features such as DTrace and ZFS. Beside that, FreeBSD contains other technologies similar to those found in OpenSolaris.

One of the advantages of moving to FreeBSD is that altough a number of companies contribute code to the FreeBSD base, non of them owns FreeBSD, neither can they push the project development in a certain direction. Interested companies, developers, volunteers and the community all work together.

So, should OpenSolaris users consider moving to FreeBSD? What are your thoughts on this?

FreeBSD Mall donates FreeBSD discs to NSRC workshops in Africa

The FreeBSD Mall, a provider of high quality FreeBSD software, documentation, support, and services to the open source community, recently donated FreeBSD CDs and DVDs to the NSRC (Network Startup Resource Center) for UNIX / FreeBSD workshops being held in Malawi and Tanzania.

The NSRC is a non-profit organization dedicated to spreading networking knowledge to diverse regions throughout the world. Open source operating systems are excellent instructional tools for NSRC workshops due to their easy and free acquisition and superior security and stability.

FreeBSD Mall has donated FreeBSD CDs and DVDs to NSRC and AfNOG (African Network Operators Group) workshops since as far back as 2000. Over 1300 participants have been instructed in approximately 50 NSRC and AfNOG workshops and tutorials. Discs donated by FreeBSD Mall are distributed to students who complete the workshops, allowing them to take home official copies of the software they were just trained on and continue to use those skills. O’Reilly Media also provides books so that people may continue the education process at home in combination with the software.

During NSRC workshops, students learn about network development and the logic behind it. Students are then “let loose” on hardware and software to experiment and learn hands-on with FreeBSD and UNIX. Beginners learn the ropes by installing the operating systems and learning basic commands and techniques. As students progress to the intermediate and advanced classes, they learn and experience more complex commands and tasks.

The NSRC uses these lab-based workshops to teach through doing; a process which also helps students to ensure that they can execute the skills they’ve learned to teach them to others in their community. With copies of FreeBSD in their hands, graduates of the workshops develop skills in networking and system administration in order to better their local community and find related jobs.

“I want to say a BIG thank you to FreeBSD Media. You may not know this, but through your support, we have now trained over 100 female Unix administrators on FreeBSD in the past three years. This is by no means a small number, when you look around your IT department and realize that there are very few women working in the tech industry.” – Dorcas Muthoni, General Manager, OpenWorld Ltd. and NSRC/AfNOG Workshop Organizer

(via)

Update on FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization Project

Bjoern Zeeb has provided a summary regarding the completion of the funded portion of the FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization Project:

“I am happy to report that the funded parts of the FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization project are completed. Some of the results have been shipping with 8.1-RELEASE while others are ready to be merged to HEAD.

Jails have been the well known operating system level virtualization technique in FreeBSD for over a decade. The import of Marko Zec’s network stack virtualization has introduced a new way for abstracting subsystems. As part of this project, the abstraction framework has been generalized. Together with Jamie Gritton’s flexible jail configuration syscalls, this will provide the infrastructure for, and will ease the virtualization of, further subsystems without much code duplication. The next subsystems to be virtualized will likely be SYSV/Posix IPC to help, for example, PostgreSQL users. This will probably be followed by the process namespace.”

The full post can be read on the FreeBSD Foundation’s blog: Update on FreeBSD Jail Based Virtualization Project

BSD Show – more BSD interviews

Most readers here will be aware of BSDTalk, a blog filled with audio interviews about the BSD family of free operating systems.

There is now another BSD related show over at webbaverse.com:  The BSD Show

So fare there are the following FreeBSD related interviews:

Bordeaux 2.0.8 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD released

The Bordeaux Technology Group released Bordeaux 2.0.8 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD today. Bordeaux 2.0.8 is a maintenance release that fixes a number of small bugs. With this release firefox and winetricks have been updated

Bordeaux 2.0.8 was built on FreeBSD 8, PC-BSD 8 and PC-BSD 7.1  A .sh installer is provided for FreeBSD and a .pbi installer for PC-BSD

Depending on sales, Bordeaux Software plans to add Pulse Audio to the next major BSD release. So if you would like to have Pulse Audio in Wine on FreeBSD and PC-BSD make a purchase. Help spread the word!

Full post: Bordeaux 2.0.8 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD Released

Purchase Bordeaux and help support Wineconf 2010 and FreeBSD

By purchasing Bordeaux you support further development of Bordeaux, but this month you will also indirectly support the FreeBSD Foundation as part of the revenues are shared: Purchase Bordeaux and help FreeBSD