BSD Now Episode 28: Ghost of Partition (video)

The bsdnow.tv team has uploaded a new episode: Ghost of Partition.

This episode (see video below) is shorter than normally as the hosts, Allan Jude and Kris Moore, are at AsiaBSDCon.

This episode has an interview with Eric Turgeon, founder of the desktop-focused GhostBSD project and a tutorial on disk concatenating in NetBSD.

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FreeBSD Participating in Google Summer of Code

FreeBSD is pleased to announce that once again we have been selected to participate in the Google Summer of Code program. This gives University students the opportunity to earn a $5,500 USD stipend in exchange for working on Open Source software over their Summer break. Students have around 12 weeks to work on their project, and will be mentored by existing FreeBSD committers. Participating organisations will earn $500 USD per student mentored.

FreeBSD’s organisation page may be found here and a list of possible project ideas may be found here. Please note that projects do not have to come from the ideas list, and indeed students are encouraged to produce their own project ideas – the majority of past projects have been thought up by the participants themselves. More details about FreeBSD’s participation in Google Summer of Code including contact details can be found here.

Students are also encouraged to visit the GSoC website to view more details of the program, including eligibility requirements, and a list of other participating organisations.

Source: FreeBSD Now

ZFS 101 (aka ZFS is cool and why you should be using it)

ZFSDru Lavigne, who does an excellent job writing FreeNAS and PC-BSD documentation, has done a presentation at SCALE 2014 expo (23 Feb) on the ZFS filesystem.

She goes into the different ZFS features such as software RAID, the ability to self-heal data corruption, copy-on-write, low-overhead snapshots, support for multiple boot environments, and many more cool things ZFS can do for you. The last part of the presentation is about how these technologies are utilised in FreeNAS and PC-BSD..

The slides of the presentation can be viewed on Slideshare: ZFS 101

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BSD Now Episode 26: Port Authority (video)

bsd_now_logoThe bsdnow.tv team has uploaded a new weekly episode, Port Authority, featuring an interview with Joe Marcus Clark and a FreeBSD ports tutorial.

In this episode (see video below) the two hosts, Allan Jude and Kris Moore, chat about the following topics:

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FreeBSD 10.0: release.sh mapped

Rick Miller has put together a useful and visually easy to understand map of FreeBSD 10 release.sh.

FreeBSD‘s release.sh is a shell script introduced in FreeBSD 9.x whose purpose is to automate FreeBSD release building from source.  This post maps the release.sh into a table of variables and a flowchart describing the program flow and is based on release.sh

Thanks Rick

BSD Now Episode 25: a sixth pfSense (video)

bsd_now_logoThis is an interview with Chris Buechler, from the pfSense project, to learn just how easy it can be to deploy a BSD firewall. There’s also a walk through the pfSense interface so you can get an idea of just how convenient and powerful it is.

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BSD Real-Time Operating System NuttX makes its 100th release: NuttX 6.33

nuttx_iconNuttX is a real-time operating system (RTOS) with an emphasis on standards compliance and small footprint. Scalable from 8-bit to 32-bit micro-controller environments, the primary governing standards in NuttX are POSIX and ANSI standards. Supported platforms include ARM, Atmel AVR, x86, Z80 and others.

Additional standard APIs from Unix and other common RTOS’s are adopted for functionality not available under these standards, or for functionality that is not appropriate for deeply-embedded environments.

NuttX was first released in 2007 by Gregory Nutt under the permissive BSD license, and today the 100th release was made: NuttX 6.33.