iredmail available for FreeBSD now

Zhang Huangbin and shake.chen contacted me to say that iRedMail is now also available for FreeBSD (working on Linux already)

iredmail is a

  • mail server solution supporting FreeBSD 7.x/8.x, support both i386 and x86_64.
  • a shell script set, used to install and configure all mail server related software automatically.
  • open source project (GPL v2).

The project’s page can be found on Google Code

Has anybody experience with iredmail, and how does it compare to other mail server solutions?

BSD hacker job available

Justin Sherill mentions on the DragonFlyBSD Digest that was contacted by a recruiter to see if he knew anybody who might be interested in a BSD hacker job:

My client right now is an established proprietary trading firm. That means that they use only their own capital, and don’t have any investors. They were founded in 2002 and currently have about 50 people. They focus on trading multiple asset classes with extremely high-frequency both in the US and abroad. The unique twist on this firm is that they don’t hire people with finance backgrounds. They are looking for the best talent they can find in both math and technology, and then let them come up with unique solutions of their own.

We’re currently looking for some top-notch systems programmers. People who are really great C++ hacks, and have experience using one of the versions of BSD are ideal for us. In addition, we like people who have experience programming in Perl, and working on network protocols or file systems. This place has a very flat organization, and is pretty casual in dress…jeans are the norm. It’s basically a dot.com that got transported from Silicon Valley to NYC.

Head over to the Digest for more info, required experience and Justin’s email address to get you in touch with the recruiter.

Changing FreeBSD ISO filenames

People who collect ISO images from more than just the FreeBSD Project have been mentioning it would be nice if “FreeBSD” was part of the filenames for a while now.

Ken Smith has committed a change that will add “FreeBSD-” to the beginning of the filenames.

So for example 9.0-RELEASE-amd64-dvd1.iso becomes FreeBSD-9.0-RELEASE-amd64-dvd1.iso

Source: FreeBSD Current Mailinglist

FreeBSD Foundation end-of-year newsletter (2009)

FreeBSD foundation logoDeb Goodkin announced the publication of the annual FreeBSD Foundation’s End-of-Year Newsletter (2009).

Table of contents:

  • Letter From the President
  • End-of-Year Fundraising Update
  • New Console Driver
  • Flattened Device Tree Project
  • Improvements to the FreeBSD TCP Stack
  • Highly Available Storage Project
  • FreeBSD Developer Summit, Cambridge, UK
  • EuroBSDCon 2009
  • KyivBSD 2009
  • 2009 Grant and Travel Grant Recipients
  • FreeBSD Testimonial from iXsystems
  • Financials

The full newsletter can be read here.

Previous years’ newsletters: 2008200720062005

FreeBSD and Linux (RootBSD)

rootbsd_bsd_hostingThe guys over at RootBSD have updated their blog with a post on the differences between Linux and FreeBSD; partly seen from a hoster’s perspective.

We thought it would be a good idea to help educate our current RootBSD users, and potential users, as to some of the differences between FreeBSD and Linux. We have nothing against Linux at all, we actually like it, however there are very noticeable differences in the two. Without turning this into too much of a religious debate, here are a few points we consider

Let’s start off by looking at, what we believe is, the biggest difference in the two.

First off, Linux itself is a kernel, not an OS! Distributions (Red Hat, Debian, Suse and others) provide the installer and bundle lots of other open source software. There are easily well over 300 different Linux distributions. While this gives you a lot of choices, the existence of so many distributions also makes it difficult to use different distros since they are all a little bit different. Distributions don’t just differ in ease-of install and available programs; they also differ in directory layout, configuration practices, default software bundles, and most importantly the tools and prorcedures for software updates and patches.

FreeBSD is a complete operating system (kernel and userland) with a well-respected heritage grounded in the roots of Unix development. Since both the kernel and the provided utilities are under the control of the same release engineering team, there is less likelihood of library incompatibilities. Security vulnerabilities can also be addressed quickly by the security team. When new utilities or kernel features are added, the user simply needs to read one file, the Release Notes, which is publicly available on the main page of the FreeBSD website.

The post carries on with looking at performance, security and software: FreeBSD and Linux

About RootBSD

RootBSD was established with one goal in mind: provide reliable, flexible, and supported BSD-based hosting services to professionals and businesses.

RootBSD gives you the power to innovate and scale on top of the BSD operating systems. Their services are rock solid; in fact, you could call them the BSD hosting solution.

Website: RootBSD

Update on FreeBSD HAST Project

Pawel Jakub DawidekBack in October we mentioned that the FreeBSD Foundation decided the fund the HAST project (new FreeBSD Project: HAST)

Pawel Jakub Dawidek, the sponsored FreeBSD developer, has made quite a bit of progress since and finished the development of stage one:

I want to report that first milestone of the HAST project is complete.

Summary of the work that have been done:

  • Implementation of hastd daemon.
  • Implementation of hastctl utility to manage hastd daemons.
  • GEOM_GATE class was extended so that the caller can specify the name of GEOM provider. Before only /dev/ggateX names were supported. HAST will use /dev/hast/
  • Implementation of communication protocol. There is abstraction layer on top and below there are three protocols implemented currently:
  • proto_tcp4 – It is used for communication between primary and secondary nodes.
  • proto_uds – (UDS – UNIX Domain Socket) It is used for communication between hastctl and hastd.
  • proto_socketpair – It is used for communication between main hastd daemon and worker processes forked from it.
  • Implementation of nv (name-value) API, which allows to easy create packets containing name-value pairs. It is used for entire communication through the protocols above. It is also responsible for managing correct byte-order.
  • Implementation of ebuf (extendable buffer) API, which provides a way to extend given buffer by adding data at the back, but also at the front without reallocating it and copying the data very often (or never).
  • Implementation of logging API (pjdlog). The API decides if messages should be logged on standard output/error (before going into background) or to syslog (when we daemonize). It also provides some shortcuts for logging a message and exiting, etc. It supports notion of debug level and can skip messages intended for higher debug level than requested.
  • Implementation of configuration file parser in lex/yacc. Configuration file is designed in a way that it can be kept identical on both nodes.
  • Checksumming and compression for the data is not one of the project’s goal, but the stubs are there, so this can be added easly.
  • A lot of care was taken to be able to handle more nodes in the future. This is not implemented and in not project goal, but I wanted to make it ready for future improvements (source)

HAST enables users to use the FreeBSD operating system for highly available configurations where data has to be shared across the cluster nodes. The software will allow for synchronous block-level replication of any storage media (GEOM providers, using FreeBSD nomenclature) over the TCP/IP network and for fast failure recovery. HAST will provide storage using GEOM infrastructure, which means it will be file system and application independent and could be combined with any existing GEOM class. In case of a master node failure, the cluster will be able to switch to the slave node, check and mount UFS file system or import ZFS pool and continue to work without missing a single bit of data.

In order to fund more of these sort of projects, the Foundation is reliable on our donations and support. The Foundation hasn’t reached its 2009 goal yet. You can help by donating.

(BTW, I’m in no way affiliated with the work of the FreeBSD Foundation;  I only want to see FreeBSD progress to become even better)

FreeBSD Mall now shipping FreeBSD 8

freebsd_8_cdThe FreeBSD Mall is now shipping FreeBSD® Version 8.0. The four-disc CD set or dual-sided DVD is available for purchase, either individually or on a subscription basis at a discounted price. The FreeBSD Mall has a long tradition of providing a reliable source of software, documentation, and support to the open source community.

We are pleased to be the primary distributor of the FreeBSD 8.0 release. FreeBSD Mall takes its commitment to customer service very seriously, and will continue its current tradition of providing outstanding FreeBSD services and software through this latest release.

says Theresa Garner, General Manager, FreeBSD Mall, Inc.

FreeBSD Version 8.0 marks the beginning of the new 8-STABLE branch, which improves upon the functionality of FreeBSD Version 7.X and introduces new features. Key focuses of the FreeBSD 8.0 release include wireless networking, virtualization, and storage technology.

The release features the addition of Virtual Access Points (VAP) support to 802.11 wireless networking, which allows mulitiple wireless networks to be hosted from a single access point. Draft 802.11 mesh networking support allows FreeBSD-based devices to dynamically link together to create a larger wireless network.

In addition, virtual machine administrators can now create their own nested jails, and FreeBSD now supports host and guest modes in Virtual Box. FreeBSD 8.0 can also run as a 32-bit Xen Dom U guest.

Other notable features of FreeBSD 8.0 include:

  • NFSv3 GSSAPI support, experimental NFSv4 client and server.
  • 802.11s D3.03 wireless mesh networking and Virtual Access Point support.
  • ZFS is no longer in experimental status.
  • Ground-up rewrite of USB, including USB target support.
  • Continued SMP scalability improvements in many areas, especially VFS.
  • Revised network link layer subsystem.
  • Experimental MIPS architecture support.

pfSense on FLOSS (audio interview)

pfsense logo 100x100Scott Ullrich and Chris Buechler, the guys behind the pfSense project, have been interviewed by Randal Schwartz and Leo Laporte on FLOSS 101. (via)

FLOSS Weekly is a podcast covering free and open source software.

Will Backman has interviewed Randal Schwartz on BSDTalk (24 mins). They talk about Randal’s early experiences with BSD, permissive licenses, OpenBSD, OpenSolaris, perl, the BSDFund credit card, and the Floss Weekly podcast.