FreeBSD and Google Summer of Code 2009

Google is now hosting the Google Summer of Code for the 5th year running, and FreeBSD has been selected again as eligible for the mentoring organisation.

If you or any other student is interested in contributing to the development of FreeBSD and get paid for doing so, have a look at the FreeBSD Summer of Code 2009 page. You can find here general information, info on past projects, sample project ideas, guidelines etc etc.

Key dates to note:

 

  • March 23 - Student application period opens
  • April 3 - Student application deadline.
  • April 15 – The End of applications
  • April 20 - ccepted student proposals announced on the Google Summer of Code 2009 site
  • May 23 – Project officially began
  • July 6 - Mentors and students can begin submitting mid-term evaluations
  • July 13 - Mid-term evaluations deadline
  • August 10 – Suggested ‘pencils down’ date. Take a week to scrub code, write tests, improve documentation, etc.
  • August 17 - Firm ‘pencils down’ date. Mentors, students and organization administrators can begin submitting final evaluations to Google
  • August 24 – final assessment deadline
  • August 25 - Final results of GSoC 2009 announced
  • September 3 - Students can begin submitting required code samples to Google

FreeBSD and Google’s Summer of Code (GSoC)

The FreeBSD Project is pleased that Google has once again invited the FreeBSD Project to participate in their Summer of Code program, which pays student developers to work on Open Source projects.

Over the last four years, over 70 Summer of Code projects have generated improvements to almost every part of FreeBSD; many of the students have gone on to become permanent members of FreeBSD’s international development team.

Students interested in working with the FreeBSD Project should start preparing now by visiting the Google Summer of Code website and the FreeBSD Summer of Code site and discussing their ideas on one of the FreeBSD public mailing lists or on the #freebsd-soc IRC channel on EFNet. P.S. Please pass along this post or one of these posters to anyone who might be interested.

Source: FreeBSD Announce Mailinglist

BSDers at the Googleplex

Matt Olander and Murray Stokely have written up a summary of the MeetBSD Conference last month:

The meetBSD 2008 conference recently held at the Googleplex in Mountain View, California, USA brought together more than 150 users and developers of the various flavors of the BSD operating system. The conference featured some great speakers, including talks by Robert Watson, Philip Paeps, Kris Moore and many others. There was also a panel to discuss the Google Summer of Code™ program, hosted by Murray Stokely and Leslie Hawthorn of Google. They were joined on stage by former mentors and students from the FreeBSD and NetBSD projects to give an overview of the program, some of the amazing results, and some tips and stories about participating. Saturday’s content wrapped up with impromptu breakout sessions to discuss PC-BSD, FreeBSD, security issues, and other topics.

After the first day of the conference, attendees were taken by bus to the Zen Buddha Lounge in Mountain View for a private party to celebrate the 15th Anniversary of the FreeBSD operating system. A great time was had by all and, like most birthday parties, this one included a cake! We went a step further though: our cake was shaped like the FreeBSD logo in 3D, complete with horns. Dr. Kirk McKusick had the honors of cutting the cake and handing out a few pieces.

Full blogpost here (Google Open Source Blog – 10/12/2008).

Man thanks to Google for making this conference possible!

New Channel on YouTube for BSD Technical Content

Murray Stokely, from the FreeBSD Core Team, has setup a new channel for technical BSD content on Youtube for high quality, full hour-long videos of talks and tutorials from BSD Conferences

http://uk.youtube.com/bsdconferences

Thanks to help from the Open Source Program Office at Google I was able to setup a new channel for technical BSD content without the 10 minute limit for uploaded videos. This allows us to upload high quality full hour-long videos of talks and tutorials from BSD Conferences. I’ve added the first four videos that Julian Elisher taped from the MeetBSD 2008 conference we recently held in Mountain View.

More…

FreeBSD Summer of Code finished – update

Murray Stockely reports about the success rate for Summer of Code students working on FreeBSD. 19 out of 21 students successfully completed the program this summer.  He has created a summary of all 19 individual projects. On the Google Open Source Blog he wrote a post to showcase some student projects from our fourth successful summer of code:

FreeBSD has participated as a mentoring organization in the Google Summer of Code™ each year since 2005. This year, FreeBSD mentored 21 students with a final success rate of 91%. Robert Watson and I have written a detailed summary of the FreeBSD 2008 Summer of Code experience. With the help of our mentors we’ve selected three successful projects to showcase here:

The summer has ended but many students are continuing to work on their projects.

Google FreeBSD Summer of Code 2008 results

The FreeBSD Project is proud to have taken part in the Google Summer of Code 2008. We received more high quality applications this year than ever before. In the end it was a very tough decision to narrow it down to the 21 students selected for funding by Google. These student projects included security research, improved installation tools, new utilities, and more. Many of the students have continued working on their FreeBSD projects even after the official close of the program.

The FreeBSD project has released an update on the (finished/continuing) work of the projects:

  • Implementation of MPLS in FreeBSD
  • TCP/IP regression test suite (tcptest)
  • Porting Open Solaris Dtrace Toolkit to FreeBSD
  • Adding .db support to pkg_tools –> pkg_improved
  • Porting BSD-licensed text-processing tools from OpenBSD
  • Multibyte collation support
  • VM Algorithm Improvement
  • TCP anomaly detector
  • FreeBSD auditing system testing
  • Dynamic memory allocation for dirhash in UFS2
  • Reference implementation of the SNTP client
  • NFSv4 ACLs
  • Enhancing FreeBSD’s Libarchive
  • Allowing for parallel builds in the FreeBSD Ports
  • Ports license auditing infrastructure
  • Improving layer2 filtering
  • Porting FreeBSD to Efika (PPC bring up)
  • Audit Firewall Events from Kernel
  • Create a tiny operating system from FreeBSD

All results here.

Running Google Chrome on FreeBSD

Since Google Chrome just recently launched and it unfortunatly only supports Windows I felt a little bit dissapointed. But hey that doesn’t stop me so easy. So i decided to check out what wine (a windows api emulator for linux and FreeBSD) could do for me.

So i downloaded chrome and tried to run ChromeSetup.exe with wine. No success, wine whined about a windows sytem call regarding http not implemented. So i googled around a bit and noticed that that call was implemented in the latest wine… Did i run the latest wine? no…

Read further: Part 1 - Part 2

Yesterday I mentioned that Google Chrome is released under the BSD License. Oliver suggested (in the comments) that the EULA is very restrictive and Chrome cannot be ported to FreeBSD. Google has changed the EULA now after a storm of protest. Ars Techica concludes that since Chrome is released under the BSD license, the EULA is unenforceable.

It’s worth noting that the EULA is largely unenforceable because the source code of Chrome is distributed under an open license. Users could simply download the source code, compile it themselves, and use it without having to agree to Google’s EULA. The terms of the BSD license under which the source code is distributed are highly permissive and impose virtually no conditions or requirements on end users.

Whatever the license restrictions, Chrome is open source and I’m sure the Wine team will get it to run without major hickups soon.

Google web browser: Chrome

On 1 September Google introduced its new web browser, Chrome, with a comic book.

Yesterday when Chrome became available I installed it and have been using it happily for a few hours. It’s light weight, fast and stable. As can be expected from Google the browser is simple and has a clean and intuitive user interface.

Today, Google launched a new web browser called Google Chrome. At the same time, we are releasing all of the code as open source under a permissive BSD license. The open source project is called Chromium – after the metal used to make chrome. Today, Google launched a new web browser called Google Chrome. At the same time, we are releasing all of the code as open source under a permissive BSD license. The open source project is called Chromium – after the metal used to make chrome.  Source

I know it’s only a beta version yet, but I was missing my favourite (Firefox) extensions and a “subscribe to RSS button”. Hopefully this will be added before the final version comes out.

Did you know that Microsoft had a multimedia browser project code-named Chrome back in 1998?Ironical or what?

Is the launch of Chrome the beginning of another browser war? We don’t know yet, but competition is always good. Do you remember the anti-trust cases against Microsoft for bundling Internet Explorer to Windows? Microsoft is now planning to sue Google because of Chrome claiming that Google is a monopoly, according to the Inquirer.

You may wonder why I post this on my BSD focused blog. Well, in the first place because Chrome is an open source project released under the permissive BSD license, and secondly I’m just excited about it. Google will be releasing a Linux and MAC version soon. Maybe this can be ported to FreeBSD too…?