EuroBSDCon, BhyveCon, PkgNG, ShiBSD, PC-BSD and pfSense

Freebsd newsWelcome to the latest (Free)BSD news round-up in which we have a mix of news snippets and links. Just a round-up of those miscellaneous (Free)BSD related links that are newsworthy and which you may find interesting, but are yet too small to package as individual posts.

Some of the links below have already appeared in our Google Plus +FreeBSD Central and @FreeBSDCentral.

 

Start multiple MySQL servers

EuroBSDCon 2014, InterExpo Congress Center, Sofia, Bulgaria 25 – 28 Sep

BHyveCon 2014 (Tokyo) videos (via)

BSD Professional Lab Exam Beta Opens at BSDCan 2014

PkgNG with Baptiste Daroussin at vBSDCon

Shibe’s operating environgment: ShiBSD

Tarsnap price cut

NetApp supporting FreeBSD once again

Full Featured FreeBSD Desktop in 5 minutes

PC-BSD Weekly Feature Digest 23

pfSense 2.2-ALPHA Snapshots Available

PC-BSD® Roadmap

Why I Chose Non-ECC RAM for my FreeNAS

The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System

51O2s8E3dsL._SY300_For many years, The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System has been recognized as the most complete, up-to-date, and authoritative technical guide to FreeBSD’s internal structure. Now, this definitive guide has been extensively updated to reflect all major FreeBSD improvements between Versions 5 and Versions 11.

Approximately one-third of the content in this edition is completely new, and another one-third has been extensively rewritten. The authors fully cover every FreeBSD improvement today’s sysadmins, application and system programmers, and support professionals need to know about.

Three leading FreeBSD experts begin by providing a concise overview of FreeBSD’s current design and implementation. Next, while explaining key design decisions, they detail the concepts, data structures, and algorithms used in implementing each significant systems facility. Readers can use this book as both a working reference and an in-depth study of a leading contemporary, portable, open source operating system.

For pre-ordering and more details visit the amazon page: The Design and Implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System (2nd edition)

freebsdnews.net looking for a new owner

This website is looking for a new owner. Since I’m not able to dedicate enough time to maintain this website anymore, I have decided to step back and let somebody else take over and run it. I loved building up this site and keeping it up to date for the last 7 years (almost), so it’s been a hard decision to let it go.

I’ll still be around and be part of the FreeBSD community, but I need more time to work on something else FreeBSD related……

If you’re interested in taking over a 7 year old website with a steady and healthy amount of daily page views and a Google PR of 5, please get in touch to work out the details.

First impressions of FreeBSD 10.0

freebsd project logo 100x100Jesse Smith has written a review of FreeBSD 10.0 in this week’s Distrowatch Weekly: First impressions of FreeBSD 10.0.

Overall it is a fair and balanced review with some points of critique. Jess is impressed with FreeBSD 10 and its many new features, but there are still some points that should be addressed in FreeBSD 10.1, especially around package management (pkgng). I guess this should be adressed later this year, when backwards compatibility with the old pkg_ tools is dropped and developers can focus on pkgng only.

What most of my problems with FreeBSD came down to was the repeating issue that software installed using pkg did not also install all required dependencies. Some immediate dependencies might be installed, but not all the items further down the dependency chain. The above example of installing Xfce without getting X was one instance, installing WordPress without getting a database or web server in the process was another example.

[...]

Largely due to the dependency gaps and troubles with getting third-party software up and running my impressions of FreeBSD came down to two main points. The first is that FreeBSD — the command line tools, the kernel, the ZFS file system and installer — is a great operating system. In both test environments FreeBSD was fast, stable and ran smoothly. I really like the work which has gone into the system installer for this release and I like that ZFS is so easy to enable and use. The documentation which comes with FreeBSD is detailed and helpful. The new package manager is fast and friendly when compared next to its predecessors. All of this means it is pretty easy to install FreeBSD, explore the system and, once it is up and running, an administrator is unlikely to encounter a broken system.

On the other hand, I got the impression that FreeBSD’s ports collection does not receive the same level of care as the base operating system. Some of the available ports obviously have not been tested against a clean installation of FreeBSD to make sure all dependencies have been met. The state of the X port is, in short, unfortunate. This gap between the quality of the base FreeBSD operating system and its available ports is made all the more evident now that a quality package manager like pkg is present. It is easier than ever before to search for and install new software, but too much effort is required to hunt down dependencies and tweak the configuration of key ports. What this results in is a wonderful base operating system that is plagued by trouble once we try to add third-party functionality to it.

Jesse also brings up an interesting point about a possible missed opportunity with jails as a deployment platform.

You can read the whole review here: First impressions of FreeBSD 10.0.

Thanks Jesse for reviewing FreeBSD 10.0

BSD Now Episode 23: Time Signatures (video)

bsd_now_logoThe bsdnow.tv team has uploaded a new weekly episode, Time Signatures, featuring an interview with Ted Unangst.

In this episode the two hosts, Allan Jude and Kris Moore, chat about the following topics:

This post is sponsored by our partner CloudSigma who cares about your cloud stored data. CloudSigma leaves data stored in Europe, in Europe. No data sharing with the US, and vice-versa.

20131216123155-cloudsigmapoweredbybanner

FreeBSD Foundation Announces 2013 Fundraising Results

FreeBSD foundation logoThe FreeBSD Foundation has announced the fundraising results for 2013. In total, $768,562 was raised from 1659 donors, slightly under 2012′s achievement of $771,193 from 1855 donors.

The Foundation’s 2013 financial report and the 2014 budget are expected to be available soon. I’m sure we’ll also find out soon which new project(s) will be funded in 2014.

To support the Foundation funding different FreeBSD related conferences and projects, you can donate here – and you don’t have to wait until December. (I am not affiliated with the FreeBSD Foundation).

Read the announcement here (includes a picture of some of the Foundation’s members):
FreeBSD Foundation Announces 2013 Fundraising Results

FreeBSD Status Report – 2013-Q4

freebsd project logo 100x100The FreeBSD Project has released its fourth status report for 2013 (October to December 2013). It comes with 37 entries and gives a nice insight on what developers have been working on.

“The last quarter of 2013 was very active for the FreeBSD community, much like the preceding quarters. Many advances were made in getting FreeBSD to run on ARM-based System-on-Chip boards like Cubieboard, Rockchip, Snapdragon, S4, Freescale i.MX6, and Vybrid VF6xx. FreeBSD is also becoming a better platform for Xen and the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud. There are plans for FreeBSD to become a fully supported compute host for OpenStack. The I/O stack has again received some performance boosts on multi-processor systems through work touching the CAM and GEOM subsystems, and through better adaptation of UMA caches to system memory constraints for ZFS. The FreeBSD Foundation did an excellent job in this quarter, and many of their sponsored projects like VT-d and UEFI support, iSCSI stack, Capsicum, and auditdistd are about to complete. At the same time, new projects like Automounter and Intel GPU updates have just been launched. The Newcons project has been merged into -CURRENT, which will make it possible to finally move to the latest version of X.Org in the Ports Collection. Efforts are also under way to improve testing with Jenkins and Kyua. It is an exciting time for users and developers of FreeBSD!”

From the table of contents:

Continue reading

m0n0wall 1.8.1 released

m0n0wall logo 100x100Manuel Kasper has announced the release of m0n0wall 1.8.1. This version is based on FreeBSD 8.4 and will thus give better support for newer hardware than m0n0wall 1.34.

Some of the change highlights are

  • add scheduler (“Croen”) service with many different job types (enable/disable interface or shaper rule, Wake on LAN, reboot, reconnect WAN, execute command etc.)
  • improved IPv6 support, including IPsec, DHCPv6-PD, RDNSS and DNSSL, and NDP info on the ARP diagnostic page
  • major overhaul of wireless LAN support. On some cards, it is now also possible to create multiple APs at the same time. To reflect this change, the wireless settings have moved to the Interfaces: assign page, where WLAN subinterfaces can be created much like for VLANs.
  • DNS forwarder: add option to log DNS queries, add aliases (CNAMEs) and MXs
  • Add AES-256, SHA-256/384/512 and additional DH group options to IPsec
  • Make rule moving and deletion on shaper rules page work like for firewall rules.
  • Initial support for USB modems
  • enable CPU hardware crypto support
  • automatically reassign available physical network interfaces if none of the assigned interfaces in the configuration can be found on the system (i.e. for a new installation, or when moving an existing config to new hardware)
  • the “embedded” image is gone; generic-pc-serial should now be used for PC Engines and Soekris boards
  • console speed for serial images is fixed to 9600 baud (no longer tries to use BIOS preset value)
  • introduction of an automated build system that allows one to build m0n0wall from scratch with almost no manual intervention on a standard FreeBSD 8.4 system
  • countless bug fixes and improvements in UI and system configuration code

Links: Website | Downloads | Change Log | Upgrade Instructions

About M0n0wall: M0n0wall is an embedded firewall distribution based on FreeBSD, and provides a small image which can be put on and run from CF cards, CD-Roms and hard disks. It also runs on a number of embedded platforms and virtual PCs.