kFreeBSD with ZFS, Bordeaux on PC-BSD, benchmarks and pfSense

Debian’s GNU/kFreeBSD Installer will support ZFS

“While Debian GNU/kFreeBSD has supported the ZFS file-system with its FreeBSD-8 kernel, support for installing the Debian GNU/kFreeBSD distribution to a root ZFS file-system will now be possible with the Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” release.

For those unfamiliar with Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, it takes the GNU user-land but runs it atop the FreeBSD kernel rather than Debian GNU/Linux with the Linux kernel. You can still use apt-get and do most anything you would with the Linux-based Debian distribution (aside from different hardware compatibility and other support differences), but instead you’re running the FreeBSD kernel.

While the upstream FreeBSD project doesn’t have an easy root ZFS file-system installation option within FreeBSD 8.0/8.1, this isn’t particularly ground-breaking, as the FreeBSD-based PC-BSD already has ZFS installation support that is quite easy to work.”

Full post on Phoronix: Debian’s GNU/kFreeBSD Installer Will Support ZFS

Review of Running Bordeaux on PC-BSD

Jesse Smith of Distrowatch has used Bordeaux for a week and written up his (mostly positive) experience (feature story):

“The Bordeaux Technology Group is a company specializing in compatibility software. Specifically, they work at making it as easy as possible to run Windows programs on the UNIX family of operating systems. Their Bordeaux tool is built to run on Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris, OpenIndiana and Mac OS X. Bordeaux is, at its heart, a customized build of Wine. They take a recent version of Wine, add some special tools and test their build for compatibility against a group of popular Windows software. They then sell this bundle (along with support) for about US$20 – 25, much less than the typical cost of a Windows license. A few weeks ago I had a chance to chat with Tom, a member of the Bordeaux Technology Group, and he was kind enough to give me a copy of Bordeaux (PC-BSD edition) to test-drive.

The provided PBI package was about 44 MB and it installed without any problems. With the install completed, two icons were added to my desktop and application menu. These new icons were labelled “Bordeaux” and “Cellar Manager”. I launched Bordeaux first and was presented with a new window featuring three tabs along the top. These three tabs are called “Install Applications”, “Manage Wine” and “Unsupported Packages”. At the bottom of the window, regardless of which tab is selected, are two buttons called “Help” and “Install”. Clicking the Help button always opens a browser window to the Bordeaux documentation website. The Install button actually performs different functions depending on which tab is selected.”

Read on for the remainder of the story, and the conclusion: Test-driving Bordeaux 2.0.8

NB, Bordeaux Group has a 50% offer going: Bordeaux 50% off recession busting sale

New benchmarks of OpenSolaris, BSD & Linux

Phoronix has benchmarked the latest OpenSolaris-based distributions (OpenSolaris, OpenIndiana, and Augustiner-Schweinshaxe), compared to PC-BSD, Fedora, and Ubuntu. The Phoronix review concludes:

There you have it, the performance of the latest OpenSolaris distributions against PC-BSD/FreeBSD and two of the most popular Linux distributions. The Fedora and Ubuntu operating systems won most of the tests, but there were a few leads for PC-BSD while the OpenSolaris operating systems just one won test (Local Adaptive Thresholding via GraphicsMagick) at least for our benchmarking selection and workload. If you are using an OpenSolaris-based operating system hopefully you are not using it for a performance critical environment but rather to take advantage of its technical features like DTrace, ZFS (though that is becoming moot with its availability on PC-BSD/FreeBSD and even Linux), etc.

Check out the article for the graphs, benchmark details and hardware used: New benchmarks of Opensolaris, BSD and Linux

Build your own Router (pfSense)

Martin Diers set up pfSense for a new warehouse.

My company is expanding into a warehouse, and so for the first time, I have to setup a WAN. That’s a Wide Area Network, which basically means joining together two or more LANs so everyone can see each other, even if you are across the country.

At my company, I have our local internet router running pfSense on a traditional PC with two network cards. It works just like your home linksys or netgear router. It’s just faster and can handle a lot more traffic. It is also extremely stable. I never have to reboot the thing. You configure it just like your home router: through a web interface

He finishes the article by saying how easy setting up a wlan with pfsense (and cheap), compared to the 90′s:

pfSense has been the best router software I have ever used. It is as capable as anything put out by Cisco or HP, and it is open source. For the cost of the bare hardware, you can have a world-class router that supports many other services such as local DNS resolution, content filtering, bandwidth monitoring, Quality of Service controlls, the list goes on, and you can even have it in an little fanless package.

Read the whole post: Build your own router (trojanbadger.com)

pfSense is a free, open source customized distribution of FreeBSD tailored for use as a firewall and router. In addition to being a powerful, flexible firewalling and routing platform, it includes a long list of related features and a package system allowing further expandability without adding bloat and potential security vulnerabilities to the base distribution.”

Bordeaux Sale on (50% discount)

bordeaux wine windows softwareTom Wickline has announced a 50% off recession busting sale on Bordeaux for FreeBSD and PC-BSD. If sustainable, the sale will last till US unemployment rate falls below 7%.

To help the FreeBSD Foundation in it’s end-of-year fund-raise drive, I will donate any affiliate commission I receive this month, if you buy Bordeaux through this link.

If you’ve not heard of Bordaux (apart from the French wine), with Bordeaux you can run many of todays most popular Windows based office applications and games on your operating system of choice.

From the announcement:

“The Bordeaux Technology Group is proud to announce a 50% off recession busting sale on Bordeaux for Linux, Mac, FreeBSD, PCBSD and OpenIndiana. With the current US unemployment rate hovering near 10% and rumors of the possibility of a double dip recession. We want to do our part to help save individuals and small business as much money as we can on their Wine related software needs. With Bordeaux you can run many of todays most popular Windows based office applications and games on your operating system of choice.

Over the past two years their has been a large multitude of changes that have taken place in Wine. And with Wine 1.2.1 being recently released users can run more of their favorite Applications and Games on their unix operating system of choice.

Bordeaux for Linux and BSD will be marked down to only $10.00 and Bordeaux for Mac and OpenIndiana will cost only $12.50 during this sale.

This sale will last until the US unemployment rate falls below 7% or as long as we can feasibly run this half off sale. So, if you have ever wanted to try Wine or Bordeaux and have put off your purchase in the past this is the perfect time to try Bordeaux and save 50% off the normal selling price.

Supported Applications/Games:

  • Microsoft Office 2007
  • Microsoft Office 2003
  • Microsoft Office 2000
  • Microsoft Office 97
  • Microsoft Office Visio 2003
  • Microsoft Office Project 2003
  • Adobe Photoshop 6
  • Adobe Image Ready 3
  • Adobe Photoshop 7
  • Adobe Image Ready 7
  • Adobe Photoshop CS
  • Adobe Photoshop CS2
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 7
  • Microsoft Internet Explorer 6
  • FireFox 3.6.8 and multimedia plug ins
  • Apple Safari 5.0 Web Browser
  • Steam and Steam based Games
  • Google SketchUp 7.1
  • VLC 1.1.0
  • Apple QuickTime 6.5.2 Player
  • IrfanView 4.27 (Image files only)
  • Winetricks support”

Buy here and support the FreeBSD Foundation.

FreeBSD news and links (week 40)

I have some  news links an leftovers for you from (the) last (few) week(s):

1. PC-BSD 8.1 [Review]
We always wonder why is it that Microsoft makes us pay to use its OS, so why not shift to Linux or UNIX which are open source and free to use. No doubt Microsoft has made it very easy for lay man to use a PC but we all know Linux is more secure than Windows. Also, off late Linux developers are concentrating on GUI to make Linux easy to use.

FreeBSD – a UNIX like operating system has evolved from AT&T UNIX via Berkely Software Distribution. FreeBSD has a text installer. PC-BSD was founded by FreeBSD professional named Kris Moore in 2005. Kris Moore’s goal was to make FreeBSD easy for everyone to install on desktop. PC-BSD is aimed at users like you and me who are accustomed to Windows but would like a free OS. It has a graphical installation program which uses KDE SC graphical user interface.
Continues (thinkdigit.com)

2. EuroBSDCon Presentation on pc-sysinstal (PDF)
There was a lot of interest about the changes to the pc-sysinstall backend during Kris Moore’s presentation at EuroBSDCon. Continues (Dru’s blog)

There’s an interview with John Hixon from iXsystems on pc-sysinstall (potentially on FreeBSD): bsdtalk199

3. Ten ways Linux and BSD differ

I hear it all the time: people lumping together Linux and any of the BSDs. On occasion, I’ve even done it myself. Of course, there are plenty of similarities. Both are based on Unix and have mostly been developed by non-commercial organisations. They also share a common goal — to create the most useful, reliable operating system available. But there are also significant differences that shouldn’t be ignored, and I thought it would be worth highlighting them here.Continues (zdnet.co.uk)

4. New FreeNAS 0.8 alpha

First and foremost, we have a completely new GUI look and feel. We’ve imported dojango into the GUI to take advantage of Dojo JavaScript Toolkit. The flow of the interface is much nicer, it looks better, and we’ve added additional help to make it easier to use. We think you’ll like this new GUI. We’ve made dozens of improvements over the past few weeks to the GUI. We hope you like the new location for enabling shares. Contiunues (Warner’s blog)

5. Using Clonezilla with FreeNAS or Network Share to Backup a Hard Disk

6. pfSense router setup in VirtualBox

7. Bordeaux Software is looking for testers (and bloggers): Looking for someone to do a review


Bordeaux 2.0.8 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD released

The Bordeaux Technology Group released Bordeaux 2.0.8 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD today. Bordeaux 2.0.8 is a maintenance release that fixes a number of small bugs. With this release firefox and winetricks have been updated

Bordeaux 2.0.8 was built on FreeBSD 8, PC-BSD 8 and PC-BSD 7.1  A .sh installer is provided for FreeBSD and a .pbi installer for PC-BSD

Depending on sales, Bordeaux Software plans to add Pulse Audio to the next major BSD release. So if you would like to have Pulse Audio in Wine on FreeBSD and PC-BSD make a purchase. Help spread the word!

Full post: Bordeaux 2.0.8 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD Released

Purchase Bordeaux and help support Wineconf 2010 and FreeBSD

By purchasing Bordeaux you support further development of Bordeaux, but this month you will also indirectly support the FreeBSD Foundation as part of the revenues are shared: Purchase Bordeaux and help FreeBSD

Bordeaux 2.0.6 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD Released

The Bordeaux Technology Group released Bordeaux 2.0.6 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD. Bordeaux 2.0.6 is a maintenance release that fixes a number of small bugs and includes many new features.

Some of the changes are:

  • Wine 1.2 included,
  • Updated to the latest winetricks release,
  • Updated to the latest DIB Engine patch,
  • Added support for IrfanView 4.27,
  • Install the IrfanView Plug ins during the IrfanView Install,
  • Improved Internet Explorer 7 support,
  • Added Support for FireFox 3.6.3 and multimedia plugins,
  • Added Support for VLC 1.1.0,
  • Added Support for Google SketchUp 7.1 (NVIDIA Video Card Recommended),
  • Added many fixes for Steam,
  • More fixes to the Bordeaux UI and Cellar Manager.

Bordeaux 2.0.6 was built on FreeBSD 8, PC-BSD 8 and PC-BSD 7.1. A .sh installer is provided for FreeBSD and .pbi installers for PC-BSD.

Depending on sales, the Bordeau Group plans to add Pulse Audio to the next BSD release. So if you would like to have Pulse Audio in Wine on FreeBSD and PC-BSD make a purchase.

Read the full press release: Bordeaux 2.0.6 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD Released

I have just bought a copy of Bordeaux for PC-BSD/FreeBSD to support Tom and his team. They’re doing a great job building a bridge between *nix and the Windows world. Most of use still need/want to use some Windows programs Linux/PC-BSD/FreeBSD. If you’re interested, be quick as there’s a 50% off sale on. A copy costs only $10.

Find out more about Bordeau for FreeBSD/PC-BSD

The Bordeaux Technology Group is a software services and development company specializing in Windows compatibility software. Users of Linux systems from time to time find themselves in the need to run specialized Windows software. The Bordeaux suite enables access to these programs and data in a seamless and low cost manner without requiring licensing of Microsoft Technology.

Bordeaux 50% off sale in celebration of the Wine 1.2 release

bordeaux wine windows softwareThe Bordeaux Technology Group has announced a one month sale on Bordeaux for Linux, Mac, FreeBSD, PC-BSD and OpenSolaris. With the release of Wine 1.2 it marks the first stable Wine release in nearly two years. And with this release they’d like to celebrate and show their appreciation for all the hard work that has gone into the Wine 1.2 release. And one way of doing this is having their first ever sale here at the Bordeaux Group.

Over the past two years there have been many changes in Wine. Now with Wine 1.2 being released users can run more of their favorite Applications and Games on their UNIX operating system of choice.

Bordeaux for Linux and BSD will be marked down to only $10.00 and Bordeaux for Mac and OpenSolaris will cost only $12.50 during this sale.

This sale will last for only one month, starting on Friday July 16th 2010 and ending on Friday August 20th 2010. So, If you have ever wanted to try Wine or Bordeaux and have put off your purchase in the past this is the perfect time to try Bordeaux and save 50% off the normal selling price.

Annoucement | Wine for BSD | Wine for Linux

Continue reading

CrossOver Office and Games for FreeBSD / PC-BSD

Tom Wickline has written a short introduction on CrossOver Office for FreeBSD / PC-BSD.

Codeweavers, the company behind CrossOver, is according to their website, the leading corporate backer of the Wine Project. Wine is an open source software initiative that is systematically re-implementing the Win32 API under Unix. Wine makes it possible for PCs running Unix-based operating systems (like OS X and Linux) to run Windows application as if natively.  CrossOver is comparible to Bordeaux.

Tom writes:

CrossOver for FreeBSD is a commercial variant of Wine released by  CodeWeavers with (currently) limited support for many of today’s most popular office application and games. CrossOver Office and Games for FreeBSD is tested for performance and stability with many of todays most popular games such as Guild Wars, Eve Online, and Steam games like Half-Life 2 and Portal. As well as many of todays most popular Office application such as Microsoft Office 97 to 2007, Quicken, Quickbooks, Photoshop, Internet Explorer and many other not mentioned applications.

Read Tom’s full review here:  An introduction to CrossOver Office and Games for FreeBSD

Links:

Bordeaux | Codeweavers

Thanks, Tom, for emailing me about your review.

Bordeaux on PC-BSD Screenshot tour

This Screenshot tour is of the upcoming Bordeaux 2.0.6 release.

In this release Bordeaux will start installing the IrfanView Plugins by default. Irfanview has also been upgraded from the 4.25 release to the newest 4.27 release. 2.0.6 will also come with a new Wine release and the newest winetricks and DIB engine releases. There will also be many more fixes in the forthcoming release then the ones listed here. So if you would like to help support the next release please consider purchasing Bordeaux for Linux, Mac OS X, FreeBSD, PC-BSD or OpenSolaris.

Screenshot Tour

http://bit.ly/c87LKY

The Bordeaux Technology Group is a software services and development company specializing in Windows compatibility software. Users of Linux systems from time to time find themselves in the need to run specialized Windows software. The Bordeaux suite enables access to these programs and data in a seamless and low cost manner without requiring licensing of Microsoft Technology (about)