BSD Router Project: New Kern, New Protocols

The BSD Router Project (BSDRP) has released version 0.32 of its free embedded router distribution (previously mentioned here)

BSD Router Project (BSDRP) is an embedded open source router distribution based on FreeBSD with Quagga and XORP that fit on a 512Mb Compact Flash/USB.

Based on FreeBSD 8.0-Release-p2, the release comes with the new options ”show memory” and ”show traffic”, RCS revisioning for the configuration file and upload/download of data via SCP. Further new features include DHCP relay, NetFlow probes, the Link-Layer Discovery Protocol, (in OpenLLDP) and the Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP). A Userland variant has replaced the CARP implementation in the kernel and the Quagga routing software has been updated to version 0.99.15 (source)

Images for the BSD Router Project 0.32 will fit on a 512Mb Compact Flash/USB. The router distribution under the BSD license is available for download on the BSDRP homepage.

BSDRP Project Website | Features | Download

iXsystems team and new office (fotos)

A few months ago iXsystems (the corporate sponsor behind FreeNAS and PC-BSD) moved into a new and larger office.

Time for some pictures of the building, the team and the assembly halls.

See the rest of the pictures here

iXsystems is the all-around FreeBSD company that builds FreeBSD certified servers and storage solutions, runs the FreeBSD Mall, and is the corporate sponsor of the FreeNAS and the PC-BSD Projects. We also provide FreeBSD Hardware Support and Professional Enterprise Grade FreeBSD and PC-BSD Support.

FreeBSD HAST project completed

Pawel Jakub Dawidek was awarded a grant by the FreeBSD Foundation last year to implement storage replication software that will enable users to use the FreeBSD operating system for highly available configurations where data has to be shared across the cluster nodes.

The HAST (High Availability Storage Project) is now completed. Pawel reports:

I’m very happy to report to FreeBSD users that the HAST project I was working on for the last three months is ready for testing and already committed to the HEAD branch.

I’ll describe what HAST does in few words. HAST allows for synchronous block-level replication of any storage media (called GEOM providers, using FreeBSD nomenclature) over a TCP/IP network for fast failure recovery. HAST provides storage using the GEOM infrastructure, meaning it is file system and application independent and can be combined with any existing GEOM class. In case of a primary node failure, the cluster will automatically switch to the secondary node, check and mount the UFS file system or import the ZFS pool, and continue to work without missing a single bit of data.

I must admit the project was quite challenging, not only from the technical point of view, but also because it was sponsored by the FreeBSD Foundation. The FreeBSD Foundation has a great reputation and is known to select the projects it funds very carefully. I felt strong pressure that should I fail, the FreeBSD Foundation’s reputation might be hurt. Of course, not a single dollar would be spent on a failed project, but the FreeBSD community’s expectations were very high and I really wanted to do a good job.

During the work a number of people contacted me privately offering help, explaining how important HAST is for FreeBSD and giving me the motivation to soldier on.

I hope that HAST will meet the community’s expectations and I myself am looking forward to using it

The final commit notice from Pawe? Jakub Dawidek briefly describes the project. A detailed discussion of the project is available form the FreeBSD Wiki.

This is a good example of how the wider FreeBSD community can financially support further development of FreeBSD, and it also shows the value that the FreeBSD Foundation brings to the community. To see more of these sort of projects started, funded and completed, why not support and donate to the Foundation so they can continue sponsoring more projects. (disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the FreeBSD Foundation)

Released: PC-BSD 8.0 (Hubble Edition)

iXsystems has announced the availability of PC-BSD 8.0 (Hubble Edition), running FreeBSD 8.0-RELEASE-P2, and KDE 4.3.5.

PC-BSD 8.0 contains a number of enhancements and improvements over the 7.x series. For a full list of changes, please refer to the changelog.

Some of the notable changes are:

  • FreeBSD 8.0-RELEASE-P2
  • KDE 4.3.5
  • Brand new System Installer, allows the install of PC-BSD or FreeBSD
  • Run in Live mode directly from DVD
  • Updated Software Manager, allows browsing and installing applications directly via the GUI
  • Support for 3D acceleration with NVIDIA drivers on amd64

From the press release:

iXsystems announced today the latest release of PC-BSD™, Version 8.0, Hubble Edition. This fully functional open source desktop operating system is built upon the new FreeBSD 8.0 release. FreeBSD is one of the most widely used UNIX-based operating systems, providing advanced performance and high levels of security and stability. The Hubble Edition contains a number of improvements and additions that make this release rock solid. The most notable features of PC-BSD 8.0 include a new system installer, integrated software manager, and a ports jail.

The new system installer is highly scriptable and contains many new features. Users may now upgrade from the previous release or restore from a backup created with Life-Preserver. With a single click, users can choose between the installation of PC-BSD or the traditional FreeBSD operating system. In addition, the installer provides support for ZFS on root partitions, Gmirroring of disks, and allows Geli disk encryption. This installer is perfect for a user installing on one machine or an Administrator installing on hundreds.

PC-BSD Hubble also features the ports console, which allows users to build and install ports in a jail environment without breaking the working desktop setup. The integrated Software Manager enhances PC-BSD’s general ease of use by allowing users to browse and install PBIs without launching a browser. The software manager also keeps the applications updated and allows users to recreate desktop icons at any time.

“PC-BSD Hubble Edition greatly enhances the users’ overall desktop experience, while offering new features for power users to take advantage of FreeBSD 8.0 improvements,” (Kris Moore)

PC-BSD websiteDownloadsChangelogRelease Notes

GhostBSD live DVD with an installer

The GhostBSD Team have released an updated BETA (Live DVD) with in installer. GhostBSD is a Gnome based FreeBSD Live DVD (not maintained by the official FreeBSD project)

I have finish a GhostBSD live DVD with an installer on it. But the installer its not a beta or an release. it just to promote and have help to finish thy installer. All are default on it. all is programmed in python and glade. You can find all the source code in /install path. The folder are pybakend and installer.

GhostBSD live DVD with an installer

Distrowatch interview with Kris Moore (PC-BSD 8)

Distrowatch interviewed Kris Moore, the main developer of PC-BSD. The conversation is mainly about the upcoming PC-BSD 8.

Recently, I had a chance to exchange some e-mails with Kris Moore (pictured on the right), the founder of the PC-BSD project. For those of you interested in the BSD scene, PC-BSD is a desktop operating system which uses FreeBSD as its base. The PC-BSD team has been busy recently, preparing for their 8.0 release. Mr Moore kindly agreed to answer a few questions, which I’ll share here with you.

Interview with Kris Moore, PC-BSD (Distrowatch)