Updated: FreeBSD events and conferences calendar

I’ve updated my FreeBSD Events & Conference Calendar and added:

Did you know being BSDA certified gives you an edge? TAO Security is looking to hire a BSDA certified FreeBSD systems administrator.

If you’re aware of any FreeBSD related events that aren’t listed, please let me know.

Released: NVidia driver 180.22 (x86) for FreeBSD

NVidia has announced the availability of the new 180.22 grapics drivers for FreeBSD.

Release Highlights:

  • Added support for the following GPUs:
    • Quadro FX 2700M
    • GeForce 9400M G
    • GeForce 9400M
    • GeForce 9800 GT
    • GeForce 8200M G
    • GeForce Go 7700
    • GeForce 9800M GTX
    • GeForce 9800M GT
    • GeForce 9800M GS
    • GeForce 9500 GT
    • GeForce 9700M GT
    • GeForce 9650M GT
    • GeForce 9500 GT
  • Added initial support for PureVideo-like features via the new VDPAU API (see the vdpau.h header file installed with the driver).
  • Added preliminary support for OpenGL 3.0.
  • Added new OpenGL workstation performance optimizations.
  • Enabled the glyph cache by default and extended its support to all supported GPUs.
  • Disabled shared memory X pixmaps by default; see the “AllowSHMPixmaps” option.
  • Improved X pixmap placement on GeForce 8 series and later GPUs.
  • Improved stability on some GeForce 8 series and newer GPUs.
  • Fixed a regression that could result in window decoration corruption when running Compiz using Geforce 6 and 7 series GPUs.
  • Fixed an nvidia-settings crash when xorg.conf contains Device and Screen sections but no ServerLayout section.
  • Fixed a problem parsing the monitor sync range X config file options.
  • Fixed a problem with the SDI sync skew controls in nvidia-settings.
  • Fixed a problem that caused some SDI applications to hang or crash.
  • Added support for SDI full-range color.

Note that the gtk-2.x ports package(s) shipped with FreeBSD releases > 5.3-RELEASE are binary incompatible with those shipped with FreeBSD 5.3-RELEASE; due to this, the `nvidia-settings` binary shipped with 180.22 will not work on FreeBSD > 5.3-RELEASE. This problem can be solved by (re-)building `nvidia-settings` from source:


# fetch ftp://download.nvidia.com/XFree86/nv…-180.22.tar.gz
# tar zxf nvidia-settings-180.22.tar.gz
# cd nvidia-settings-1.0# gmake
# install nvidia-settings /usr/X11R6/bin

Download driver | Readme & Installation Guide  

Source: nvidia.com (08/01/2009)

Freebsd mount a NAS via SMB / CIFS (howto)

Qestion: I want to use our NAS server to store backups. Our NAS supports FTP and CIFS / SMB sharing technology. How do I mount and store files on NAS using FreeBSD? How do I automate entire procedure using a shell script? Is that doable? If so, what’s the easiest solution ftp or CIFS?

Answer. The mount_smbfs command mounts a share from a remote server using SMB/CIFS protocol. You can easily mount NAS share using the following syntax:

Source: cyberciti.biz (25/01/2008)

Using ccache on FreeBSD (howto)

ccache is a compiler cache. It speeds up re-compilation of C/C++ code by caching previous compiles and detecting when the same compile is being done again.

The following is a step by step guide to how to enable and use ccache on FreeBSD 7.1:

  1. su
  2. # cd /usr/ports/devel/ccache
  3. # make install clean
  4. # vim /etc/make.conf

.if (!empty(.CURDIR:M/usr/src*) || !empty(.CURDIR:M/usr/obj*)) && !defined(NOCCACHE)

CC=/usr/local/libexec/ccache/world-cc

CXX=/usr/local/libexec/ccache/world-c++

.endif

Basically we’ve started by installing ccache (steps 1 through 3) and proceeded by editing /etc/make.conf as to enable ccache on builds.

Now we need to update the environment.

Further instructions here

Source: linux-bsd-sharing.blogspot.com (19/01/2009)

Differences between BSD and Linux

Geekmalaya has a post with 18 points on why the writer thinks FreeBSD is better than Linux

  1. BSD license allows users/companies to modify a program’s source code and not to release changes to the public
  2. BSD has the so-called “core system” (without packages)
  3. On BSD systems, all add-on packages are strictly installed into the /usr/local directory
  4. BSD systems use the system of “ports”, which are fingerprints of applications in the /usr/ports directory
  5. BSD systems have also their stable version
  6. Of course, the kernel is absolutely different
  7. BSD has FFS file system
  8. BSD systems divide their partitions internally
  9. Unless you make a good kernel hack, BSD systems can only be installed into the primary partition
  10. System configuration is manual for most of the time, but various clones like PC-BSD break this convention
  11. All BSD systems have a Linux emulation support
  12. BSD systems have less support from driver vendors, thus they lag behind in this view
  13. BSD systems do not use the Unix System V
  14. BSD kernels can be set to several security levels
  15. BSD’s have everything under one ROOF
  16. Generally, BSD systems boot and reboot faster than Linux
  17. In comparison to BSD, most Linux distributions are overbloated
  18. If you compile programs from ports, you will not stumble into compilation errors

I’m only linking to this article for information – please don’t start a flame war here. Read the whole article and the reasoning here.

Source: geekmalaya.com – 22/01/2009