OpenBSM 1.1 alpha 2 snapshot

Robert Watson announced the release of OpenBSM 1.1 alpha 2, a test snapshot of OpenBSM 1.1.

OpenBSM is a portable, open source implementation of Sun’s Basic Security Module (BSM) security audit API and file format. BSM, the de facto industry standard for audit, describes a set of system call and library interfaces for managing audit records, as well as a token stream file format that permits extensible and generalized audit trail processing. Records may describe both kernel events, such as system calls, as well as application events, such as login, password changes, etc. – source

The following are the change notes from the OpenBSM news file included with this release:

  • Include files in OpenBSM are now broken out into two parts: library builds required solely for user space, and system includes, which may also be required for use in the kernels of systems integrating OpenBSM.
  • Configure option –with-native-includes allows forcing the use of native include for system includes, rather than the versions bundled with OpenBSM. This is intended specifically for platforms that ship OpenBSM, have adapted versions of the system includes in a kernel source tree, and will use the OpenBSM build infrastructure with an unmodified OpenBSM distribution, allowing the customized system includes to be used with the OpenBSM build.
  • Various strcpy()’s/strcat()’s have been changed to strlcpy()’s/strlcat()’s or asprintf(). Added compat/strlcpy.h for Linux.
  • Remove compatibility defines for old Darwin token constant names; now only BSM token names are provided and used.
  • Add support for extended header tokens, which contain space for information on the host generating the record.
  • Add support for setting extended host information in the kernel, which is used for setting host information in extended header tokens. The audit_control file now supports a “host” parameter which can be used by auditd to set the information; if not present, the kernel parameters won’t be set and auditd uses unextended headers for records that it generates.

OpenBSM releases and snapshots can be downloaded from the OpenBSM project web page.

This test release is known to build and run (to varying degrees) on FreeBSD 6.x, 7.x, 8.x, Mac OS X Leopard, and OpenSuse Linux.

FreeNAS 0.69 RC1 release (Salusa Secundus)

The FreeNAS Project announced the availability of the first release candidate for FreeNAS 0.69, a FreeBSD-based operating system which provides free Network-Attached Storage (NAS) services.

Major changes:

  • Modify password handling for user ‘admin’. Because of that the password will be set back to the default which is ‘freenas’.
  • Add quixplorer 2.3.1 to administrate file system via web browser. It is accessible via http://xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx/quixplorer or WebGUI ‘Advanced|File Manager’. Administrator can login via user ‘admin’ and the WebGUI password. Local system users have access to /mnt only.
  • Replace PHPMailer with msmtp SMTP mail client.
  • Add UPS email notification.
  • Upgrade lighttpd to 1.4.20.
  • Upgrade e2fsprogs to 1.41.3.
  • Upgrade Adaptec AACRAID 32/64-bit driver to v5.2.0 Build 15753.
  • Upgrade arcconf to 5.30.17509.
  • Upgrade scponly to 4.8.

Full changelog | download

Flash 9 for FreeBSD 7.1 (howto)

Flash 9 for FreeBSD at last! And I don’t mean having to run a Windows or Linux browser — Flash 9 in native Firefox 3. FreeBSD’s linux emulation layer has undergone some upgrades recently, and as of FreeBSD 7.1 it is able to provide enough kernel support to get the linux Flash player version 9 running. Very good indeed, and hopefully it’ll hold us out until Adobe create official native FreeBSD support (assuming that rumour comes true). Note: this only works on i386 and AMD64 platforms.

Instructions here (crnl.org/blog, 01/11/2008)

BTW PC-BSD 7.0.1 comes with Flash 9 pre-installed

Many thanks Aragon for letting me know.

Codeweaver’s software free for download

This is not directly FreeBSD related (though Codeweavers have started working on a FreeBSD product), but since most readers here also use Linux, I’d like to make you’ll aware of the following:

Codeweavers are offering their products for free tomorrow, 28/10/08.

CodeWeavers is the leading corporate backer of the Wine Project. Wine is an open source software initiative that is systematically re-implementing the Win32 API under Unix. Wine makes it possible for PCs running Unix-based operating systems (like OS X and Linux) to run Windows application as if natively.

The catastrophic cratering of the global economy, falling gas prices and President George W. Bush’s recent executive activities have indirectly prompted Saint Paul gadfly software developers CodeWeavers, Inc., to provide free software for every American on Oct. 28, company officials reluctantly announced today.

In July, CodeWeavers – whose software lets Mac OS X and Linux users run Windows programs without having to Microsoft for a Windows OS license – launched the Great American Lame Duck Presidential Challenge (lameduck.codeweavers.com) to encourage President Bush to make the most of his remaining days in office by accomplishing a major economic or political goal by January 20, 2009. more…

PC-BSD 7.0.1

After much hard work and testing the PC-BSD Team is happy to announce the availability of PC-BSD 7.0.1, (i.e. the first upgrade in the 7 series, with FreeBSD 7.0 under the hood)

Version 7.0.1 contains a number of bugfixes and improvements. For a full list of changes, please refer to the changelog. Some of the changes are:

  • KDE 4.1.2
  • AMD64 version
  • NTFS write support
  • Adobe Flash 9 support (Linux -flashplugin9)
  • Better WIFI support
  • Updates to the System Updater

This version of PC-BSD can be downloaded and installed as a fresh install or, alternatively, can be updated to from PC-BSD 7.0 via the System Update tool.

Many thanks for all the feedback we have received via the Forums and the Testing mailinglist.

Links: Download | Changelog | PBI packages

No cost FreeBSD shell accounts online

Having an online *BSD shell account is great for experimenting with BSD, network debugging or testing environments. There is a number of shell providers available for different flavours of BSD.

If you want to sign up with any do some research with regards to available RAM, speed of the machine, type of processor and server connection speed.

HP Testdrive seems to be one of the better ones, if not the best. If offers plenty of choice with regards to operating systems, have massive servers with plenty of RAM and fast processors.

BSD Talk has a short introduction on free online shells (BSD Talk 8) and a couple of links to providers.

I’d also like to mention the MTV Europe shell project. Though online only part-time and not free for FreeBSD (yet) it comes with a few extras.

I got one server with FreeBSD installed, which is available for access during weekends. If more than 20 people will subscribe I can keep it running 24/7.

FreeBSD Summer of Code finished – update

Murray Stockely reports about the success rate for Summer of Code students working on FreeBSD. 19 out of 21 students successfully completed the program this summer.  He has created a summary of all 19 individual projects. On the Google Open Source Blog he wrote a post to showcase some student projects from our fourth successful summer of code:

FreeBSD has participated as a mentoring organization in the Google Summer of Code™ each year since 2005. This year, FreeBSD mentored 21 students with a final success rate of 91%. Robert Watson and I have written a detailed summary of the FreeBSD 2008 Summer of Code experience. With the help of our mentors we’ve selected three successful projects to showcase here:

The summer has ended but many students are continuing to work on their projects.