Win4BSD now free for non-commercial use

Virtual Bridges is has announced that Win4BSD for Desktops will be offered at no charge for non-commercial use.

Win4BSD is a PC emulator that runs Windows as a guest at nearly native speed under FreeBSD/PC-BSD. It is based on QEMU. However, Win4BSD offers many advantages, including improved speed, ease of use, more seamless integration with the host OS, and “grabless” mouse transition between the host and Windows
guest.

Win4BSD.com, where the Win4BSD package can be downloaded, will become a portal for FreeBSD and PC-BSD information.

Win4BSD was built by Virtual Bridges to detirmine the level of acceptance by the FreeBSD and PC-BSD community for high-grade commercial software. After two years, we have concluded desktop BSD-oriented applications are best accepted by the non-commercial community when offered at no charge and made freely available.

Source: Virtual Bridges Blog

Beta release: FreeNAS 0.69 b4

The FreeNAS guys are doing a great job: another beta release in the .69 series. The forth beta upgrades the underlying FreeBSD system to 6.4.

Majors changes:

  • Upgrade to FreeBSD 6.4.
  • Upgrade rsync to 3.0.4.
  • Upgrade PHPMailer to 2.2.1.
  • Upgrade Transmission to 1.34.

Minors changes:

  • * Add new attribute ‘Temporary directory’ to UPnP WebGUI to define a directory used to store temporary transcoded files.
  • Modify /etc/rc.d/samba script.
  • Add ‘Who’ combobox to RSYNC client/local jobs to select user which is used to execute this job.
  • Add ‘Enable’ checkbox to RSYNC client/local jobs to enable/disable them (FR 2123243).
  • Add hw.ata.to=15 to sysctrl to prevent ‘TIMEOUT – WRITE_DMA’ errors, e.g. when using APM for harddrives (FR 2101811).

Then there are still the usual bug fixes, restrictions and known bugs.

The latest beta can be downloaded here.

7 Reasons why BSD is better than Linux

Matt Hartley, who is using Linux full time himself gives 7 reasons why BSD operating systems are preferred over Linux (but he also admits that BSD has its shortcomings):

  1. BSD is dead simple
  2. Create your own OS
  3. Speed
  4. Stability
  5. Software packaging
  6. Security
  7. Suitability for intellectual property (IP)
Follow this link for the full reasoning.

And a related sort of article I thought I’d link to:

Why you should use a BSD style license for your Open Source Project

This document makes a case for using a BSD style license for software and data; specifically it recommends using a BSD style license in place of the GPL. It can also be read as a BSD versus GPL Open Source License introduction and summary.

Please don’t start a flame war on BSD and GPL; I know all the pros and cons; I’m only providing links to articles, so if you don’t agree with the views held, please leave comments on the website I’ve linked to