7 Reasons why BSD is better than Linux

Matt Hartley, who is using Linux full time himself gives 7 reasons why BSD operating systems are preferred over Linux (but he also admits that BSD has its shortcomings):

  1. BSD is dead simple
  2. Create your own OS
  3. Speed
  4. Stability
  5. Software packaging
  6. Security
  7. Suitability for intellectual property (IP)
Follow this link for the full reasoning.

And a related sort of article I thought I’d link to:

Why you should use a BSD style license for your Open Source Project

This document makes a case for using a BSD style license for software and data; specifically it recommends using a BSD style license in place of the GPL. It can also be read as a BSD versus GPL Open Source License introduction and summary.

Please don’t start a flame war on BSD and GPL; I know all the pros and cons; I’m only providing links to articles, so if you don’t agree with the views held, please leave comments on the website I’ve linked to

The New York City BSD Conference (NYCBSDCon) 2008

The New York City BSD Conference begins in a few weeks (October 11-12, 2008 at Columbia University in New York City), so make sure you register as soon as possible. NYCBSDCon brings together the best and brightest of the BSD communities from the New York area and beyond.

The conference costs $95, including breakfast and lunch on both days, in addition to a number of other extras. Full-time students and Columbia University affiliates pay only $50 with valid identification.

This year’s schedule is impressive: from file systems and the portable C compiler to system and network management, we are thrilled to be able to provide such strong content. A full array of BSD developers and systems administrators are speaking, including Pawel Dawidek, Michael Lucas, Jason Wright and DragonFly BSD’s Matt Dillon. And Jason Dixon looks again to top his 2006 presentation on “Is BSD Dying?” with a look at “BSD versus the GPL.”

While the conference officially begins on Saturday morning, October 11th, attendees will be gathering on Friday night at Havanna Central, just across from Columbia University.

More information, including the schedule and transportation options, can be found at http://www.nycbsdcon.org.

Check out my FreeBSD Events and Conferences calendar for more events

Setting up MLDonkey on FreeBSD (howto)

Linux/BSD: sharing experiences is a blog with useful howtos for FreeBSD and Linux. The latest howto is on setting up MLDonkey on an old, headless, PC.

MLDonkey is an open source, free software multi-network peer-to-peer application. Currently the following protocols are supported: eDonkey, Overnet, Bittorrent, Gnutella, Gnutella2, Fasttrack, FileTP and Kademlia.

I wanted to put my 266 Mhz Celeron to good use so I’ve decided to install MLDonkey without X11 support leaving only the core with both telnet and web interfaces.

Bellow are the steps need to install MLDonkey on FreeBSD 7.0:

Thanks for letting me know about this post, Ricardo!

Google FreeBSD Summer of Code 2008 results

The FreeBSD Project is proud to have taken part in the Google Summer of Code 2008. We received more high quality applications this year than ever before. In the end it was a very tough decision to narrow it down to the 21 students selected for funding by Google. These student projects included security research, improved installation tools, new utilities, and more. Many of the students have continued working on their FreeBSD projects even after the official close of the program.

The FreeBSD project has released an update on the (finished/continuing) work of the projects:

  • Implementation of MPLS in FreeBSD
  • TCP/IP regression test suite (tcptest)
  • Porting Open Solaris Dtrace Toolkit to FreeBSD
  • Adding .db support to pkg_tools –> pkg_improved
  • Porting BSD-licensed text-processing tools from OpenBSD
  • Multibyte collation support
  • VM Algorithm Improvement
  • TCP anomaly detector
  • FreeBSD auditing system testing
  • Dynamic memory allocation for dirhash in UFS2
  • Reference implementation of the SNTP client
  • NFSv4 ACLs
  • Enhancing FreeBSD’s Libarchive
  • Allowing for parallel builds in the FreeBSD Ports
  • Ports license auditing infrastructure
  • Improving layer2 filtering
  • Porting FreeBSD to Efika (PPC bring up)
  • Audit Firewall Events from Kernel
  • Create a tiny operating system from FreeBSD

All results here.

bug release: AskoziaPBX 1.0.1

What happens to a lot of .0 releases happened to AskoziaPBX also: a handful of bugs managed to creap in… AskoziaPBX 1.0.1 squashed the bugs in 1.0 (The perils of .0 releases)

A week has gone by since 1.0.0 was released and we’re ready for a small update. Seven bugs killed in seven days. Thanks for all of the reports and feedback!

Downloads: http://askozia.com/pbx

Bordeaux 1.6 beta 1 for FreeBSD and PC-BSD

Previously we mentioned that Bordeaux was coming to FreeBSD, but now this promising product (for those needing Windows software and yet wanting the stability and security of BSD) has been released by Tom Wickline:

Over the past month we have made some major progress on the BSD port of Bordeaux. Bordeaux for FreeBSD now has a .sh installer, the same one that we use on Linux, so you will need to have py-gtk installed for the installer to work properly.

We also have a newly built .pbi for PC-BSD 7, a big thanks goes out to the folks at PC-BSD for doing the packaging for us. If you use PC-BSD you will need to install Wine 1.1.4 from their PBI directory in order for Bordeaux to work, prior versions of Wine in the directory don’t have support for wineprefixcreate.

Some of the major changes in this build are activex, flash and java are automatically installed for you when IE 6 is installed. Now IE 6 should open most pages that require activex support. We have the back end of the new cellar-manager mostly done now, to see what changes are planed just run cellar-manager –help and you will see a list of all the planed features. This version also incorporates the newest winetricks script and the updates that have been made to it over the past couple months. and of course lots of tweaks and bug fixes.

If you’re a FreeBSD or PC-BSD user and need to run any of the software that we currently support on the Linux client you might be interested in helping beta test this build and future builds up to the final stable release. At this time we cant give away beta builds, but what we can do is if you decide to purchase a license from the store for FreeBSD (beta) or PC-BSD (beta) your support will last six months after the final build is released, so don’t worry you will get a full six months of upgrades and support on the final product. And by purchasing a pre release build you can submit your input and help support the development process. Users who buy the BSD (Beta) will have the option of downloading the tgz (sh file) or the .pbi file.

That’s cool news. Would like to try this out. Definitely!

PC-BSD 7 Fibonacci released

PC-BSD LogoThe PC-BSD Team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 7 (Fibonacci Edition).

This release marks a milestone for PC-BSD, by moving to the latest FreeBSD 7-Stable and also incorporating the KDE 4.1.1 desktop. Users will immediately notice the improved visual interface that KDE 4.1.1 offers, as well as a large improvement in hardware support and speed from the update to FreeBSD 7-Stable. PC-BSD 7 also offers a large and growing library of self-contained PBI files available for installation, and improvments for other locales on our PBI Directory website. This release also offers new methods of installation, including a DVD, USB and Internet / Network install. 

Links: Download it nowRelease notes|Changelog | PC-BSD Guide | Website