FreeNAS 0.69 RC2 release (Kralizec)

FreeNAS LogoVolker Theile has announced the availability of the second release candidate for FreeNAS 0.69, a FreeBSD-based operating system providing free Network-Attached Storage (NAS) services:

This will hopefully be the last release candidate before a stable release can be published. So please test this version and report any problems.

Changes:

  • upgrade to FreeBSD 6.4-RELEASE;
  • add system firewall, please note that this is only for the local system and not for the network (this will also never be implemented, use pfSense or m0n0wall instead);
  • upgrade Transmission to 1.40;
  • introduce new WebGUI look (also fixes some MSIE rendering bugs);
  • add UPS service WebGUI option to define shut-down mode;
  • add option ‘Use sendfile’ to ‘Services CIFS/SMB Settings’;
  • check if configured port is already used (e.g. UPnP, BitTorrent, DAAP);
  • fix web server security hole….

Full Release Announcement | Changelog

FreeBSD 6.4 Released

FreeBSD 6.4, a new stable version of the project’s legacy 6.x branch, has been released:

The FreeBSD Release Engineering team is pleased to announce the availability of FreeBSD 6.4-RELEASE. At this time 6.4-RELEASE is expected to be the last of the 6-STABLE releases.

Some of the highlights:

  • new and much-improved NFS Lock Manager (NLM) client;
  • support for the Camellia cipher;
  • boot loader changes allow, among other things, booting from USB devices and booting from GPT-labeled devices with GPT-enabled BIOSes;
  • DVD install ISO images for amd64 and i386;
  • KDE updated to 3.5.10,
  • GNOME updated to 2.22.3;
  • updates for BIND, Sendmail, OpenPAM, and other packages.

LinksRelease announcement | Release notes | Download | FreeBSD.org

Learning FreeNAS – Local User Management

Learning FreeNAS“, by Gary Sims, is a useful book for anybody new to FreeNAS and also handy for the advanced user to check something every now and then.

This book will show you how to work with FreeNAS and set it up for your needs. You will learn how to configure and administer a FreeNAS server in a variety of networking scenarios. You will also learn how to plan and implement RAID on the server as well as how to use Storage Area Network technologies like iSCSI. The standard FreeNAS documentation walks you through the basic configuration, but this book will tell you exactly what you should do to plan, work, and deploy FreeNAS. This book has a comprehensive troubleshooting section that will point you in the right direction whenever you need help.

Packt Publishing, the publisher, have a free chapter on their website, describing how Local User management is done in FreeNAS.

Read the free chapter.

BSDTalk interview with John Todd (Asterisk)

Podcast LogosBSDTalk has a 23 minutes interview with John Todd, Open Source community director at Asterisk

BSDTalk 166 – Listen to the podcast: MP3 | OGG

For those interested in Asterisk on FreeBSD with a lot of preconfiguring already done and a lot of extras, try AskoziaPBX.

Askozia®PBX aims to make the power of Asterisk® available to the average user in a slimmed down, embedded PC friendly form. AskoziaPBX is more than another GUI for Asterisk. It is an embedded PBX solution which eases system upgrades, backups and provisioning.

TrueBSD 2.0-RC2

The TrueBSD project have released RC2 of the upcoming 2.0 version.

TrueBSD is a LiveDVD operating system based on FreeBSD with many useful applications. All open programs will keep working even when you eject LiveDVD (using command cdcontrol eject) in order to get some data from your own CDs.

The following have been added/updated:

  • Updated the system environment and the kernel to FreeBSD 7.1-PRERELEASE;
  • Fixed errors in system installer (/sysutils/trueinstall) which were caused by wrong detection storage drives;
  • Created an official subversion repository (http://truebsd.org/wiki/doku.php?id=subversion);
  • Created a non-official port of x11-wm/ion-3;
  • Created an overlay of the ports tree;
  • Changed a file system hierarchy;
  • Created skel files which are used for each new user;
  • Created a ports tree with patched versions of the software;
  • Created a kernel module snd_hda_hack.ko for additional Intel audio cards support;
  • Script /sysutils/apachemanager for managing the Apache web-server;
  • Script /sysutils/hwdetect for new hardware automatic detection;
  • Script /sysutils/snddetect for new audio cards detection
  • Script /sysutils/ifdetect for net cards detection;
  • Script /sysutils/flashpluginctl for switching on/off the Adobe (R) Macromedia (R) Flash technology;
  • Script /sysutils/getoperalang for Opera translational files installation;
  • Script /sysutils/kblayout for choosing keyboard layout and switching method;
  • New Prompt for the zsh shell;
  • Rewrote the prelogin system utility with using the cdialog. Added new items in menu;
  • Rewrote newtconf script for net configuration with using the sysinstall functionality;
  • Removed function for creating core files for programs which was stopped with segmentation fault;
  • Removed createbzip, extractbzip, formatfloppy, termfont system utilities;
  • Removed all net- and audio cards drivers from the kernel and putted to separate kernel modules;
  • Created a nice highlighting for the system console and kernel messages;
  • Updated all software;

Ubuntu vs. OpenSolaris vs. FreeBSD benchmarks (Phoronix)

In this article, the 64-bit performance of Ubuntu 8.10 is compared against the latest test releases of OpenSolaris 2008.11 and FreeBSD 7.1.

The tests included LAME MP3 encoding, 7-Zip Compression, Gzip compression, GnuPG, BYTE Unix Benchmark, Tandem XML, Bork File Encryption, Java SciMark, Bonnie++, OpenSSL, and Sunflow Rendering System. 

For our Ubuntu run we were using Ubuntu 8.10 (x86_64) with the Linux 2.6.27 kernel, X Server 1.5.2, GCC 4.3.2, GNOME 2.24, the EXT3 file-system, and Java build 1.6.0_0-b12. OpenSolaris 2008.11 RC2 is based upon Solaris Nevada Build 101b with the Sun 5.11 kernel, X Server 1.3, GNOME 2.24, GCC 3.4.3, the ZFS file-system, and Java build 1.6.0_10-b33. Lastly, we were using FreeBSD 7.1 Beta 2 (AMD64) with X Server 1.4.2, GNOME 2.22, the UFS file-system, GCC 4.2.1, and Java 1.6.0_07-b02. Aside from changes made by the Phoronix Test Suite (and adding the GNOME packages to FreeBSD), all operating systems were left in their default configuration.

Conclusion

If simply counting which operating system was in first place most frequently, it would be Ubuntu. Ubuntu 8.10 x86_64 was in first place eight times, OpenSolaris 2008.11 RC2 was in first place seven times, and FreeBSD 7.1 Beta 2 AMD64 was in first just three tests. Depending upon your system usage, one operating system may appear more favorable, like OpenSolaris with the greater disk performance. To reiterate though, all of the testing was done on a single workstation-oriented system with dual quad-core processors and 4GB of RAM. FreeBSD and OpenSolaris were also using their latest testing builds while Ubuntu was using a final release copy

Full test results and diagrams can be found on the Phoronix website.

FreeBSD Security Advisory (FreeBSD-SA-08:11.arc4random)

Background

arc4random(9) is a generic-purpose random number generator based on the key stream generator of the RC4 cipher. It is expected to be cryptographically strong, and used throughout the FreeBSD kernel for a variety of purposes, some of which rely on its cryptographic strength.

arc4random(9) is periodically reseeded with entropy from the FreeBSD kernel’s Yarrow random number generator, which gathers entropy from a variety of sources including hardware interrupts. During the boot process, additional entropy is provided to the Yarrow random number generator from userland, helping to ensure that adequate entropy is present for cryptographic purposes.

Problem description

When the arc4random(9) random number generator is initialized, there may be inadequate entropy to meet the needs of kernel systems which rely on arc4random(9); and it may take up to 5 minutes before arc4random(9) is reseeded with secure entropy from the Yarrow random number generator.

Read further to find out about the impact, solution and workaround