Presenting for FreeBSD

Last Satureday Remco Lodder did a presentation o on FreeBSD at the annual NLLGG Linux Community in the Netherlands. He explained how easy it is to contribute to FreeBSD and how to become part of (one of the) team(s).

The slides are in Dutch.

Voor het geval dat je dit leest, Remco: Goed gedaan! Jammer dat ik er niet bij kon zijn.

EDIT: English version now available

PC-BSD Thin Client Server

The PC-BSD Team has made the Thin Client Server 0.8 beta available! This PBI allows turning any PC-BSD 7.x system into a fully-functional Thin Client Server within just a few minutes. Users are encocouraged to read the Wiki which provides more details about using and working with the TCS PBI, and to provide feedback via the mailing list.  

This is great for schools and libraries. Have a look at the FenestrosBSD project (more on this project later…)

BSDers at the Googleplex

Matt Olander and Murray Stokely have written up a summary of the MeetBSD Conference last month:

The meetBSD 2008 conference recently held at the Googleplex in Mountain View, California, USA brought together more than 150 users and developers of the various flavors of the BSD operating system. The conference featured some great speakers, including talks by Robert Watson, Philip Paeps, Kris Moore and many others. There was also a panel to discuss the Google Summer of Code™ program, hosted by Murray Stokely and Leslie Hawthorn of Google. They were joined on stage by former mentors and students from the FreeBSD and NetBSD projects to give an overview of the program, some of the amazing results, and some tips and stories about participating. Saturday’s content wrapped up with impromptu breakout sessions to discuss PC-BSD, FreeBSD, security issues, and other topics.

After the first day of the conference, attendees were taken by bus to the Zen Buddha Lounge in Mountain View for a private party to celebrate the 15th Anniversary of the FreeBSD operating system. A great time was had by all and, like most birthday parties, this one included a cake! We went a step further though: our cake was shaped like the FreeBSD logo in 3D, complete with horns. Dr. Kirk McKusick had the honors of cutting the cake and handing out a few pieces.

Full blogpost here (Google Open Source Blog – 10/12/2008).

Man thanks to Google for making this conference possible!

Are you supporting FreeBSD?

Richard Bejtlich has been using FreeBSD in production environments since early 2000, and he continues to rely on it at home and at work. Even though he can download the operating system for free, he still subscribes through FreeBSDMall.com to support the project.

The FreeBSD Foundation is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to supporting and building the FreeBSD Project and community worldwide. You can see all the good work they are doing on their Web site. 

The Foundation set a $300,000 goal for 2008 fundraising, and it’s 2/3 of the way there.

It would be nice to find out how you’re supporting FreeBSD. Are you donating, coding, advocating, blogging?

PC-BSD 7.0.2 available

The PC-BSD Team is pleased to announce the availability of PC-BSD 7.0.2, with an updated FreeBSD 7.1-PreRelease under the hood and the latest KDE 4.1.3.

Version 7.0.2 contains a number of bugfixes and improvements. For a full list of changes, please refer to the changelog. Some of the changes are:

  • KDE 4.1.3
  • Improved desktop performance with Nvidia Cards
  • Improved NTFS write support
  • HAL fixes and improvements
  • Installation bugfixes

This version of PC-BSD can be downloaded and installed as a fresh install or, alternatively, can be updated to from PC-BSD 7.0.1 via the System Update tool or via a stand-alone PBI.

Many thanks for all the feedback we have received via the Forums and the Testing mailinglist.

Links: Download | Changelog | PBI Update

OpenBSM 1.1 alpha 3 snapshot

Robert Watson has announce alph3 of OpenBSM 1.1 

 The following are the change notes from the OpenBSM news file included with this release:

  • Add two new functions, au_bsm_to_errno() and au_errno_to_bsm(), to map between BSM error numbers (largely the Solaris definitions) and local errno(2) values for 32-bit and 64-bit return tokens.  This is required as operating systems don’t agree on some of the values of more recent error numbers.
  • Fix a bug how au_to_exec_args(3) and au_to_exec_env(3) calculates the total size for the token.  This bug resulted in “unknown” tokens being printed after the exec args/env tokens.
  • Support for AUT_SOCKET_EX extended socket tokens, which describe a socket using a pair of IPv4/IPv6 and port tuples.
  • OpenBSM BSM file header version bumped for 1.1 release.
  • Deprecated Darwin constants, such as TRAILER_PAD_MAGIC, removed.

OpenBSM releases and snapshots can be downloaded here: http://www.OpenBSM.org/

Frenzy (Dec 2005 – Dec 2008)

Sergei Mozhaisky has announced the release of Frenzy 1.1, a FreeBSD-based toolkit for system and network administrators. It is sad, but this version will be the project’s last release:

At last, Frenzy 1.1 is released. This is a final release of Frenzy, I decided to discontinue the development of this project.” What’s new? “Added Unionfs support; introduced FEM (Frenzy Extension Modules) system, which allows to plug-in additional software without rebuilding ISO image; Frenzy can now be booted from ISO image on hard drive; added options to boot with DMA disabled on ATAPI or ATA devices; added parameters to loader menu – ‘mode’ to choose resolution in console mode, ‘sound’ for sound card auto-detection, ‘nofem’ to disable FEM modules search and loading; added feature to use FAT partition as boot partition; bug fixes.

Read the detailed release notes for a complete list of changes and new features.

I’ve always liked Frenzy, and it was nice to have a BSD variant of nUbuntu (though not exactly the same). Frenzy is open source and hopefully someone else will take over and carry on with the project.

Quad-Core Storage Appliance with FreeNAS

iXsystems, the corporate sponsor behind PC-BSD and many BSD related Conferences, has released a NAS server wth FreeNAS: Titan FreeNAS Storage Appliance.

The Titan FreeNAS storage appliance provides security, scalability, and flexibility at a low total cost of ownership. Attach the Titan FreeNAS to your database, e-mail or web server for immediate access to additional storage and never run out of storage space again.

Titan 2120 NAS Storage Appliance Features

  • 2U form factor
  • 12 hot swap drive bays
  • Up to 12 terabytes of data storage capacity
  • Browser-Based UI for simple management
  • Advanced Journaling File System
  • Integrated RAID Support
  • Monitoring Utility
Full details for the Titan FreeNAS Storage Appliance can be found here.