Beta release: FreeNAS 0.69 b4

The FreeNAS guys are doing a great job: another beta release in the .69 series. The forth beta upgrades the underlying FreeBSD system to 6.4.

Majors changes:

  • Upgrade to FreeBSD 6.4.
  • Upgrade rsync to 3.0.4.
  • Upgrade PHPMailer to 2.2.1.
  • Upgrade Transmission to 1.34.

Minors changes:

  • * Add new attribute ‘Temporary directory’ to UPnP WebGUI to define a directory used to store temporary transcoded files.
  • Modify /etc/rc.d/samba script.
  • Add ‘Who’ combobox to RSYNC client/local jobs to select user which is used to execute this job.
  • Add ‘Enable’ checkbox to RSYNC client/local jobs to enable/disable them (FR 2123243).
  • Add hw.ata.to=15 to sysctrl to prevent ‘TIMEOUT – WRITE_DMA’ errors, e.g. when using APM for harddrives (FR 2101811).

Then there are still the usual bug fixes, restrictions and known bugs.

The latest beta can be downloaded here.

7 Reasons why BSD is better than Linux

Matt Hartley, who is using Linux full time himself gives 7 reasons why BSD operating systems are preferred over Linux (but he also admits that BSD has its shortcomings):

  1. BSD is dead simple
  2. Create your own OS
  3. Speed
  4. Stability
  5. Software packaging
  6. Security
  7. Suitability for intellectual property (IP)
Follow this link for the full reasoning.

And a related sort of article I thought I’d link to:

Why you should use a BSD style license for your Open Source Project

This document makes a case for using a BSD style license for software and data; specifically it recommends using a BSD style license in place of the GPL. It can also be read as a BSD versus GPL Open Source License introduction and summary.

Please don’t start a flame war on BSD and GPL; I know all the pros and cons; I’m only providing links to articles, so if you don’t agree with the views held, please leave comments on the website I’ve linked to

The New York City BSD Conference (NYCBSDCon) 2008

The New York City BSD Conference begins in a few weeks (October 11-12, 2008 at Columbia University in New York City), so make sure you register as soon as possible. NYCBSDCon brings together the best and brightest of the BSD communities from the New York area and beyond.

The conference costs $95, including breakfast and lunch on both days, in addition to a number of other extras. Full-time students and Columbia University affiliates pay only $50 with valid identification.

This year’s schedule is impressive: from file systems and the portable C compiler to system and network management, we are thrilled to be able to provide such strong content. A full array of BSD developers and systems administrators are speaking, including Pawel Dawidek, Michael Lucas, Jason Wright and DragonFly BSD’s Matt Dillon. And Jason Dixon looks again to top his 2006 presentation on “Is BSD Dying?” with a look at “BSD versus the GPL.”

While the conference officially begins on Saturday morning, October 11th, attendees will be gathering on Friday night at Havanna Central, just across from Columbia University.

More information, including the schedule and transportation options, can be found at http://www.nycbsdcon.org.

Check out my FreeBSD Events and Conferences calendar for more events

Setting up MLDonkey on FreeBSD (howto)

Linux/BSD: sharing experiences is a blog with useful howtos for FreeBSD and Linux. The latest howto is on setting up MLDonkey on an old, headless, PC.

MLDonkey is an open source, free software multi-network peer-to-peer application. Currently the following protocols are supported: eDonkey, Overnet, Bittorrent, Gnutella, Gnutella2, Fasttrack, FileTP and Kademlia.

I wanted to put my 266 Mhz Celeron to good use so I’ve decided to install MLDonkey without X11 support leaving only the core with both telnet and web interfaces.

Bellow are the steps need to install MLDonkey on FreeBSD 7.0:

Thanks for letting me know about this post, Ricardo!