Why FreeBSD is my favorite *nix OS (Scott Spear)

Scott Spear has created a nice summary with the reasons why he loves FreeBSD

Installation

FreeBSD provides a very easy installation process; it uses Sysinstall as an automated installation package to do it for you. All you have to do is answer some questions to create users and tell it which software to install and you are on your way to being up and running in a matter of minutes…. continued

Security

FreeBSD is one of the most secure operating systems available. There are a number of security features built into the system that deal with user and file system security. There are also a number of applications compatible with FreeBSD that offer added security beyond the default features….. continued

Compatibility

There are numerous hardware compatibilities listed on the hardware notice for each release of FreeBSD. It is compatible with all the major processors the most popular being Intel and AMD….. continued

Ports

The port system is a collection of software that is packaged and ready for installation on a FreeBSD system. You can download the source and install them very quickly and easily….. continued

Documentation

FreeBSD has many different options for documentation. They offer eight different kinds of documentation on their website including FAQ, Manual Pages, and the FreeBSD Handbook. There is also a web resources section, a for newbies section, and books and articles….. continued

Read the whole post here (webmasterbydesign.com – 08/10/2008)

FreeBSD 6.4-RC1 available

Ken Smith has announced the availability of the first release candidate for FreeBSD 6.4, the project’s production legacy branch

As the next step in the release of FreeBSD 6.4, the FreeBSD 6.4-RC1 builds are now available for testing. This is the first of an expected two release candidates. We encourage you to test out the release candidates, reporting any problems by submitting PRs or via email to the freebsd-stable list. If you would like to do a source-based update to 6.4-RC1 from an already installed machine you can update your tree to RELENG_6_4 using normal cvsup/csup methods. Note that as a somewhat inconvenient side-effect of the primary FreeBSD source repository now being in SVN the creation of the RELENG_6_4 branch in the CVS repository wound up checking in a ‘new’ version of every file, in some cases only changing the FBSDID

http://lists.freebsd.org/pipermail/freebsd-stable/2008-October/045869.html

Setting up a LAMP Server on FreeBSD

There are already many useful guides around showing how to set up and tune a FAMP server. Unlike some this guide gives also a bit more background details and explanation.

Setting up a LAMP server is a common task for systems administrators, and FreeBSD is one of the most reliable and stable operating systems available. You can swap out the L in LAMP with F for FreeBSD to build a fast and reliable Web server.

In this article I assume FreeBSD is already installed. If not, make sure you download the latest stable production version of FreeBSD and run the installer. I recommend choosing the MINIMUM option at the installer screen to quickly install only the most basic and necessary things.

Continued on cbhacker.com

Tuning FreeNAS and ZFS

FreeNAS 0.7 is still at alpha stage. However, HarryD is already using it as a production server and confirms it’s pretty stable after some minor tweaks.

It’s all very promising and I can’t wait for 0.7 final to come out. My advice, before that version is released, don’t blindly trust in ZFS, but make additional backups and store them on another machine. Just in case…

First of all it is important to ‘tune’ ZFS. I’ve seen some panics of my systems without using this parameters. It is necessary to use lots of RAM for ZFS. I have 2GB in my little server…
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