FreeBSD review and howtos from a Linux user

I recently decided to give the new 7.0 release of FreeBSD ago and was fairly impressed. I did use BSD along time ago on a home server for a few months but pretty much forgot everything about it from back then.

Firstly FreeBSD refers to both a kernel and userspace tools making it a whole operating system (userspace tools being the basic programs like shells and copy/move commands), this is different to Linux which is just a kernel and distros are technically called GNU/Linux to show that it is using the GNU userspace tools.

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BSDTalk interview with some FreeBSD Core members

There’s a new interview on BSDTalk . This one is with a few of the FreeBSD Core Team members: Warner Losh, George V. Neville-Neil, Murray Stokely, Hiroki Sato, Robert Watson, Brooks Davis, and Philip Paeps. The interview was recorded at BSDCan2008 in Ottawa, Cananda.

As a sidenote: it’s again time (after 2 years) for the FreeBSD Core Team elections . The FreeBSD Project has relied on democratic elections of the 9 member core team since 2000.

Candidates have 2 weeks in which to declare their candidacy and voting commences on June 19. Active FreeBSD committers are eligible to vote until July 16 and the results will be announced shortly thereafter. Watch this space.

new SpreadFreeBSD.org logos

There are new logos on our SpreadFreeBSD.org website which you can use.

SpreadBSD

Did you know you can help us spread the knowledge and awareness of FreeBSD/PC-BSD by putting one of the new logos on your website, blog or emails and get a point every time somebody clicks on the link?

Bij doing this you can get (by enough points) products from iXsystems free or discounted.

Have a look at the different logos: www.spreadfreebsd.org

pfSense – hardware/server request

Scott Ullrich from pfSense Project

is looking for anybody willing to donate a hardware or a fast server to speed up building and compiling of pfSense.

It seems more and more that I spend 90% of my time waiting for pfSense builds to validate code changes, kernel changes, etc
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Here’s a rundown of parts that would be ideal:

  • quad core cpu, or dualquad core if possible
  • 4g ram (not strictly necessary, but useful for cache)
  • 6 sata disks (western dig raptors would rock), and an areca or similar card with 256M-1G battery backed cache

Is there anybody able to help the pfSense project?

Read the whole blogpost and the comments here.