pfSense 1.2 release available

pfSense logoThe pfSense development team has announced the release of version 1.2! This brings the features and bug fixes from more than 16 months of development since the 1.0 release. Already widely tested and deployed throughout the Release Candidate phase, this release provides the finishing touches on releases already proven in a wide range of network environments. The Release Candidate versions have been downloaded more than 250,000 times.

More on pfSense.

PBI creating tutorial (in Spanish)

Jacob Luevano has created a great tutorial for Spanish speakers showing how to create PBIs (PC-BSD’s click-n-install packages). If your mother tongue is Spanish and you’ve been wanting to create PBIs, there’s no excuse any more.

PC-BSD proporciona un sistema de empaquetar aplicaciones denominado PBI(Push Button Installer), el cual permite a los usuarios de una forma muy fácil instalar y eliminar aplicaciones. El formato es fácil de usar y permite a los desarrolladores definir menús,iconos,registrar tipos mime. Este documento pretende ayudar a los desarrolladores a empaquetar sus aplicaciones bajo PBI.

The tutorial can be found here.

FreeNAS 0.686.1 (stable) released

FreeNAS LogoVolker Teile from the FreeNAS team has announced today that FreeNAS 0.686.1 stable has been released. The following changes and additions have been made:

Majors changes:

  • Upgrade Samba to 3.0.28.
  • Add attributes ‘Guest account’ and ‘Null passwords’ to ‘Samba: Settings’ advanced section in WebGUI.
  • Enhance WebGUI + rc-script to define additional group memberships for user accounts.
  • Replace uShare UPnP Mediaserver with MediaTomb 0.10.0. This has been done because ushare’s latest version fails to build on FreeBSD, also new version requires external libs for DLNA support which is not ported to FreeBSD right at the moment. You have to reconfigure the UPnP service to get working properly. XBox 360 is not supported.
  • Increase mfsroot size to 54mb for embedded version. So hopefully the OS has enough memory for logfiles,… Especially with Samba tbd files, which increases rapidely with a huge number of users accessing the system.
  • Continue reading

FreeBSD KDE4 status update

Martin Wilke has been working hard to get KDE4 working on FreeBSD. He got KDE4 to build/work well but it’s not yet ready for production environments. The complete KDE4 4.0.1 (without i18n) distribution is now in the test tree. He’s working on the co-existence with KDE3 to make sure that both KDE3 and KDE4 can be installed together on the same system.

FreeBSD KDE4
click to enlarge

More FreeBSD KDE4 screenshots

FreeBSD 7.0-RC3 released

The availability of the third release candidate for FreeBSD 7.0 has been announced today.

freebsdWe’re doing a ‘mini-RC3′ to encourage testing of the Highpoint driver (hptrr) backout. Testing of 7.0-RC2 showed there were problems with the driver update done between RC1 and RC2. Because it’s a ‘mini-RC’ targeted at testing of one particular thing we have not bothered with setting up FreeBSD Update. You can use the normal cvsup-and-build method of doing an update for machines that are already up and running (branch tag RELENG_7_0) or install from scratch using the ISOs available on the FTP sites. If those who experienced problems related to the hptrr driver update could let us know one way or another whether or not you are still having problems with it that would be appreciated.

Here is the brief release announcement.

DesktopBSD – Unix for the masses

Reptiler reports:

Currently I’m playing around with DesktopBSD. This actually is because I’m anyway playing with Xen, so I decided to use the time I spend on Xen to try out a few more systems. One of those is DesktopBSD, a version of FreeBSD customized for desktop-use. Thus it offers what we are used to from many Linux-distros today, ease of use and installation, automatic hardware-detection and -setup, KDE, a nice package-manager etc.
By the way, I’m not using the latest version, which is 1.6. The version I use is 1.6RC2, just because I had the image on DVD anyway. But I guess it’s recent enough for this.

As said, DesktopBSD is based on FreeBSD, which becomes quite obvious when updating packages, because those come directly from the FreeBSD-mirrors.

One thing I personally really like is the function to check the installed software for security-holes. This is simply done by comparing the list of installed software with one (or more, I don’t know the internals of those function yet) of those websites where they keep track of that kind of information. The gathered information then can be seen in the package-manager, which I think is a really nice function.

[...]

Overall DesktopBSD leaves a good impression after the first few tests. For those who always wanted to try BSD this might be an option worth considering.

Read the whole article on Nuxified.org