BSD Now Episode 25: a sixth pfSense (video)

bsd_now_logoThis is an interview with Chris Buechler, from the pfSense project, to learn just how easy it can be to deploy a BSD firewall. There’s also a walk through the pfSense interface so you can get an idea of just how convenient and powerful it is.

rootbsd_banner1This post is sponsored by our partner RootBSD, an expert in BSD style web hosting : stable, secure, flexible and friendly.

BSD Real-Time Operating System NuttX makes its 100th release: NuttX 6.33

nuttx_iconNuttX is a real-time operating system (RTOS) with an emphasis on standards compliance and small footprint. Scalable from 8-bit to 32-bit micro-controller environments, the primary governing standards in NuttX are POSIX and ANSI standards. Supported platforms include ARM, Atmel AVR, x86, Z80 and others.

Additional standard APIs from Unix and other common RTOS’s are adopted for functionality not available under these standards, or for functionality that is not appropriate for deeply-embedded environments.

NuttX was first released in 2007 by Gregory Nutt under the permissive BSD license, and today the 100th release was made: NuttX 6.33.

Newcons coming to Debian GNU/kFreeBSD

debian_logoFreeBSD vt(4) – commonly known as “Newcons”-, which is planned to replace Syscons as the default FreeBSD console, is now available on Debian GNU/kFreeBSD.

Newcons provides many interesting new features, such as KMS support, Unicode, double-width CJK characters, etc.

The Debian GNU/kFreeBSD team are now looking for volunteers: Newcons coming to Debian GNU/kFreeBSD (testers wanted!)

Build your own FreeBSD/EC2 images

Colin Percival has an interesting post (how to build FreeBSD/EC2 images) explaining how you can bake your own FreeBSD  images for Amazon EC2, and build them just the way you want them.

I have been building FreeBSD/EC2 images for the past three years, and based on the email I have been receiving, most people have been either using these images directly or modifying them to create images which suit their needs. However, there are some people who want to build their own images ab initio — most often, companies which have products built on “customized” versions of FreeBSD — and while I have helped a few people do this, it’s better if my help is not needed. To this end, earlier today I published my code for building FreeBSD AMIs. At its core, this process has two steps: First, building a disk image; and second, turning it into an AMI.

It would be now nice if somebody could make creating FreeBSD images for Google Cloud Engine real easy ;-)

 

Set up BitTorrent Sync in FreeNAS with Plugin (howto)

freenas-ixsystems-new-logoBen Milman from iXsystems has put together a tutorial (How to Set Up FreeNAS with BitTorrent Sync Using a Plugin) showing step-by-step how to install and set up BitTorrent Sync on FreeNAS.

BitTorrent Sync is a free, unlimited, secure file-syncing app which can be easily installed through the BitTorrent Sync plugin for FreeNAS. FreeNAS enables users to build network-attached-storage (NAS) on nearly any hardware platform of their choosing. There is an old tutorial on the BitTorrent blog showing how to configure BitTorrent Sync yourself, but with Josh Ruehlig’s plugin it’s a lot easier now.

If you are using FreeNAS and you need to sync and share large files with anybody via secure, distributed technology, try out the BitTorrent Sync plugin with these install notes.

Links: FreeNAS website | BitTorrent Sync

About FreeNAS: FreeNAS is a FreeBSD-based (nanobsd) and BSD licensed open source Network Attached Storage (NAS) Platform developed by iXsystems, optimised to support file storage and files sharing across Windows, Apple, and UNIX-like systems.