Android on FreeBSD

gferenc88 wrote up a guide showing how to get Android running in Oracle VM VirtualBox on FreeBSD.

Maybe it is not a big thing, but I have managed to run the Android OS with OpenGL support on FreeBSD.

Before we start, you must have enabled the Linuxulator and install the Linux base distribution from ports (emulators/linux_base-f10).

Here is how he did it: Android on FreeBSD

android freebsd

 

bsdroid google android

BSDroid was a project that ported the Android framework to FreeBSD, and the main goal of project was to provide native binaries for tools and make it possible to develop Android applications on FreeBSD powered system without Android SDK for Linux.

Unfortunately, it has gone all quiet. Does anybody know what’s happening with BSDroid?

What’s new in FreeBSD

This video has been made from the slides and an audio recording of a NYCBUG talk by Eitan Adler in Jan of 2013 and gives an over view on the newest features in FreeBSD since 9.0. This talk covered some recent enhancements to FreeBSD as well some of the experimental upcoming changes. By the end of the talk you should have heard about one FreeBSD technology you hadn’t heard of before.

It covers:

  • bsdinstall
  • bsdconfig
  • Netmap
  • SMP PF
  • pkgng
  • Poudriere
  • clang + llvm
  • Capsicum
  • Auditdistd
  • New Hardware Support
  • Atheros Wireless
  • Virtualization
  • Filesystems: growfs, ZFS TRIM, FUSE, SU+J
  • CVS moving to svn

For more information on the future of FreeBSD source retrieval please see:

PC-BSD Status Update and Future Plans

PC-BSD LogoKris Moore has laid out his plans for the future of PC-BSD, especially around PC-BSD moving to rolling releases.

First of all, I want to let you know, that I’ve personally not been satisfied with the frequency of PC-BSD releases and updates. With us tracking the upstream FreeBSD releases, it has really tied our hands getting new releases out to the public. The past couple of releases had a delay of almost a year between them, which is WAY too long in my opinion. To further compound the problem, our build system wasn’t designed to do frequent updates of packages and our utilities, which made getting updates out to the community a long and tedious process. This is all going to change. What we are looking at going to now is more of a “Rolling-Release” model, first for our utilities & system packages, and eventually for the FreeBSD base itself.

Read the whole post: Status update and future plans

A decade of OS Access-control Extensibility (MAC)

This is an interesting piece on mandatory access-control by the well-known computer researcher and FreeBSD Foundation member Robert Watson:

To discuss operating system security is to marvel at the diversity of deployed access-control models: Unix and Windows NT multiuser security; Type Enforcement in SELinux; anti-malware products; app sandboxing in Apple OS X, Apple iOS, and Google Android; and application-facing systems such as Capsicum in FreeBSD. This diversity is the result of a stunning transition from the narrow 1990s Unix and NT status quo to security localization—the adaptation of operating-system security models to site-local or product-specific requirements.

A Decade of OS Access-control Extensibility

Making computing easier: PC-BSD 9.1

pc-bsd logo 100x100Distrowatch has favourable review of recently released PC-BSD 9.1:

…”Nothing is perfect and PC-BSD does have an Achilles’ heel, specifically hardware compatibility. As much as I enjoyed the polish and the features and the wonderful ease of use, I suspect hardware support will be the make or break issue for most people. On my desktop machine I could get PC-BSD working, but only with reduced resolution and video performance. On my laptop things basically worked well, but it took a little tinkering to get my wireless card up and running. When running the operating system in a virtual machine I installed the VirtualBox guest additions, but couldn’t get PC-BSD to display its desktop at full resolution. Luckily hardware support with PC-BSD is not a trial and error process, the hardware compatibility tool takes the surprises out of testing the distribution, even when running from the plain installation media.

I definitely recommend trying PC-BSD. This new release has really taken a step forward in usability and features compared to where the project was even a year ago. I would say 9.1 brings to the table a level of ease of use and trouble-free administration only found in a few of the top ranking Linux distributions. It is well worth the time to test drive this latest release.”

You can read the review in its entirety here: Making computing easier: PC-BSD 9.1.

If you’re not going to install PC-BSD 9.1 but are curious what it looks like, have a look at the screenshots on Chris Haney’s website.

Arch GNU/Linux Ported to run on the FreeBSD kernel

The Arch Linux distribution has been modified to run off the FreeBSD 9.0 kernel as an alternative to using Linux. The developer of ArchBSD explained his reasoning as enjoying FreeBSD while also liking the Arch Linux philosophy of a ‘fast, lightweight, optimized distro’.

After Debian GNU/kFreeBSD and Gentoo/FreeBSD we have a third Linux-FreeBSD hybrid.

Read the full article on Phoronix: Arch BSD: Arch Linux Atop The FreeBSD Kernel or follow some of the discussions here.

 

FreeNAS: Flexible, fast storage, and the price is right

NetworkWorld has published a very positive review of FreeNAS:

“It takes something different to stand out in the crowded network-attached storage market. How does free, as in free beer and free speech, sound? Overall, FreeNAS offers a very positive story, with flexibility, ease of management, good performance – and a price that can’t be beat.”

FreeNAS: Flexible, fast storage, and the price is right