MaheshaBSD Server Edition – document sharing server

Juraj from the MaheshaBSD Project has announced the MaheshaBSD Server Edition.

The objective of MaheshaBSD Server is to provide users and small businesses/institutions a way to operate the simplest and least demanding FTP/WWW server for the purpose of sharing documents (information). MaheshaBSD Server can be used both for an in-house document sharing or over the internet.

MaheshaBSD Server Edition comes as a USB image and its purpose is to show Windows users the flexibility of running FreeBSD off a USB flash drive.

It immediately supports quotas; and also a possibility to redirect a NTFS drive via mount_nullfs to MaheshaBSD Server, so that users can just simply copy any file to my easy to use FTP/WWW server, as you can see on the picture attached in this email (not many BSD LiveCD’s support writing to NTFS drives unfortunately).

Some of the features included (taken from the Documentation):

  • Portability – with a straightforward FTP/WWW server running off the USB flash drive it is much easier to come up with such a flash drive to any computer available on your in-house (or home) network (LAN) than to disassemble your computer and put the hard drive to another computer where an operating system is already running;
  • No need to purchase expensive licenses for an operating system because MaheshaBSD Server is itself an operating system (FreeBSD);
  • Immediate possibility to use this server – users without any knowledge of Unix can use easy to use free programs such as WinSCP (a Windows GUI application for copying data via SFTP) – they will just copy files into MaheshaBSD Server’s FTP/WWW directory and they will be immediately displayed in a browser;
  • By setting up IP Forwarding on ports 21 (FTP), 22 (SSH), 80 (HTTP) in your router settings you will have an instant possibility to operate a public Internet FTP/WWW server;
  • Security – as long as your FTP (or WWW) server is not running in Windows as a separate program, the environment where certain cleverer individuals may  always find a way to steal your sensitive data (in case you choose a Windows FTP/web server software with unreported security holes), you will be in a great advantage as regards security;
  • A possibility to mount NTFS/FAT32 disks/flash drives/USB hard drives and use them as a place for FTP/WWW data storage. Both editions – MaheshaBSD and MaheshaBSD Server – can easily mount NTFS disks for write access, a feature not available in many BSD LiveCD distributions;
  • Remote Admin.

The full MaheshaBSD Server Edition documentation can be read here (pdf).

MaheshaBSD Server Edition is free for personal use and businesses are required to buy a  $200 license.

We have not been able to test the Server Edition yet, but a $200 license is quite a fee for a document server licens. It would be interesting to see how MaheshaBSD Server Edition compares with FreeNAS 8.2. We may do a comparison a some point in the future.

PHK says md5crypt() algorithm no longer secure

This week has been interesting with regards to online security: LinkedIn, Last.fm, eHarmony, et al had security issues and breaches.

Not directly related to these breaches, but still in the realm of security, Poul-Henning Kamp, the author of md5crypt(), has said that md5crypt() is no longer secure despite being recommended as a password hashing function. md5crypt is used to encrypt passwords on some FreeBSD systems.

The md5crypt password scrambler was created in 1995 by yours truly and was, back then, a sufficiently strong protection for passwords.

New research has shown that it can be run at a rate close to 1 million checks per second on COTS GPU hardware, which means that it is as prone to brute-force attacks as the DES based UNIX crypt was back in 1995: Any 8 character password can be found in a couple of days.

As the author of md5crypt, I implore everybody to migrate to a stronger password scrambler without undue delay.

Continues

Miscelaneous FreeBSD news updates (KDE, PC-BSD, Raspberry Pi, FBSD Foundation, OSI)

Below some miscelaneous links to FreeBSD related news and updates:

KDE/FreeBSD Bulletin with recent FreeBSD KDE ports related updates.

PC-BSD 20120605 Snapshot now available for testing. There’s also a BSD Talk interview (BSDTalk 2016) with Kris Moore, founder of the PC-BSD project, which was recorded during BSDCan 2012. Kris talks about the features going into PC-BSD 9.1.

There are some FreeBSD developers that are trying to get FreeBSD running on the Raspberry Pi, a $25 ARM Linux/GNU box: Porting FreeBSD to the Raspberry Pi.

FreeBSD, a world apart (translatedfrom Spanish with Google Translate) – interesting blog post with some FreeBSDD background information. I like the collection of open source logos.

FreeBSD Foundation prepares launch of East Coast Mirror at NYI (announement)

Simon Phipps is the new OSI President:

Phipps has already been spearheading an OSI reform process, working with the rest of the board to open up the organisation. That process has led to the creation of Open Source Initiative affiliation, bringing the Apache Software Foundation, FreeBSD, Eclipse, Mozilla, Debian, and Creative Commons, along with other organisations, on board as affiliates.

Call for Testing (CfT): xorg 7.7

Martin Wilke has put out a call for people to help him test xorg 7.7, an open source implementation of the X Window System.

The FreeBSD Xorg Team is pleased to announce Xorg 7.7 Release. We are very happy to be able to Call for testing shortly after the Xorg team annouced 7.7 release. This CFT is also open for discussion on how we should move forward with xorg release as we are facing some issues and we would like to ask for your opinion. Right now we have 2 existing xorg versions in our Ports Tree. The situation is quite bad due to our poor graphic card support. That means we do not have much choice but to take it as how it is now. But with regards to mesa support, we have to face some new challenges.

Read the whole post and the instructions here: [CFT] Xorg 7.7 ready for testing!

 

BSDCan 2012 – “The technical BSD conference

Martin Cracauer, a FreeBSD developer, went to BSDCan 2012 and wrote up his experience on the Open Source at Google blog: BSDCan 2012 – “The technical BSD conference”. I’m sure this will have been read by many with an open source interst (26716 RSS followers). Good marketing!

The FreeBSD Foundation funded some FreeBSD developers’ and contributors’ travel expenses. In return they have sumarised what the did at BSDCan, how they got involved and what it means to them.

Read the feedback from:

Some of the BSDCan presentations can be viewed here, in case you missed them.