FreeBSD Foundation End-of-Year Fundraising Campaign

The FreeBSD Foundation has started its annual end-of-year fundraising campaign. The FBSD Foundation sponsors events and conferences, helps developers pay for travel costs and provides legal assistance with regards to intellectual property.

If you want to see more projects being funded and want to see the FreeBSD operation further grow, you can show your appreciation for the Foundation’s work so far: http://freebsdfoundation.org/donate/

We are deeply grateful for all the support we receive from so many individuals and organizations who value FreeBSD. We currently are at the half way point towards our goal of raising $400,000 this year. We are hoping that you, the FreeBSD community, will help us meet our goal by making a donation this month. By donating to the foundation, you are donating to the FreeBSD Project and community as a whole.

We have had the privilege of meeting many FreeBSD enthusiasts in person, through email, and on the phone. We are always impressed with the passion that these people have for FreeBSD. Most volunteer their precious time after work and some are more fortunate where they actually get paid by their companies to work with FreeBSD. When there is a BSD related conference we usually get quite a few travel grant applications requesting help with developers’ travel expenses. Thanks to your support, we have been able to sponsor the travel expenses of developers from Mexico, Lithuania, New Zealand, Germany, Japan, Denmark, and many other countries.

With your donations, the Foundation can continue to support FreeBSD activities such as:

  • development projects to support emerging technologies such as IPv6 support in FreeBSD, GEM, KMS, and DRI support for Intel drivers, Five New TCP Congestion Control Algorithms, and much more.
  • BSD conferences around the globe, including Europe, Japan, Canada, US, and Ukraine.
  • giving students and contributors the opportunity to attend conferences and developer summits.
  • maintaining the infrastructure of computers and equipment that support our community.
  • growing the FreeBSD community through marketing and outreach to users and businesses.
  • protecting the FreeBSD trademarks and providing the project with access to legal counsel.
  • helping FreeBSD continue to serve as the foundation for research and enterprise.

You can read Deb Goodkin’s 2011 Fundraising Letter on behalf of the Foundation Board.

Disclosure: I am not affiliated with the FreeBSD Foundation and have not been asked to post anything relating to their annual fundraising campaign. If you like my website (www.freebsdnews.net) and decide to donate towards my hosting fees and new projects, then I’ll forward 20% of your donations to the FreeBSD Foundation.

2011 FreeBSD Foundation Fund Raising Letter

Integrating LLVM into FreeBSD (video)

Some of you may be aware of the LLVM Developer Meeting 2011 that took place in mid-November in San Jose, CA.

FreeBSD developer and FreeBSD Foundation member Brooks Davis was present and talked about about the path of getting LLVM/Clang integrated into FreeBSD base as the default compiler to replace the GPLv3-licensed GCC compiler.


“The FreeBSD Project has been actively working to incorporate tools from the LLVM project into our base system including clang, libc++, and possibly lldb. This talk will cover our efforts so far including our plans to ship FreeBSD 9.0 with clang in the base system. I will cover both our current work to replace GPL licensed components with BSD(ish) licensed components and future or experimental work to incorporate new technologies made possible by LLVM”

Watch the video: Integrating LLVM into FreeBSD

More information an how to build FreeBSD with clang/llvm can be found here: Building FreeBSD with clang/llvm.

About LLVM: The Low Level Virtual Machine (LLVM) is a compiler infrastructure written in C++ that is designed for compile-time, link-time, run-time, and “idle-time” optimization of programs written in arbitrary programming languages. Originally implemented for C/C++, the language-agnostic design (and the success) of LLVM has since spawned a wide variety of front ends, including Objective-C, Fortran, Ada, Haskell, Java bytecode, Python, Ruby, ActionScript, GLSL, Clang, and others. (source: wikipedia)

 

Benchmarks: FreeBSD, Oracle Linux, UFS and ZFS

Some love benchmarks, others hate them, especially when ‘apples’ are compare with ‘pears’, when Linux is benchmarked against FreeBSD.

For what it’s worth there are some new benchmarks on openbenchmarking.org:

When looking at the FreeBSD vs Oracle Linux benchmarks, keep in mind that both operating systems are quite different kernels, FreeBSD 9 is an RC and that it’s easy to tweak some settings in FreeBSD to make it a lot faster.

 

 

FreeBSD 9.0-RC3 available

FreeBSD 9.0-RC3 is now available for download.

It is expected that this will be the last of the the test builds, and final release builds will be begun in about a week’s time.

The third and what should be final Release Candidate build for the 9.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Since this is the beginning of a brand new branch (stable/9).

The 9.0-RELEASE cycle will be tracked on the 9.0 todo page.

Mailinglist announcement and download instructions can be found here: FreeBSD 9.0-RC3 Available

Rolling Your Own Kernel (BSD Magazine 2011-12)

December’s issue of the BSD Magazine is available: Rolling Your Own Kernel.

  • Free Issue to Download! BSD 12/2011
  • Google Code-In and FreeBSD’s Participation
  • Installing PC-BSD on a Mac
  • Keeping Your Configuration Files Shiny as New Using sysmerge(8)
  • Rolling Your Own FreeBSD Kernel
  • OpenBSD 5.0: PHP, Cacti, and Symon
  • Extracting Useful Information From Log Messages
  • Anatomy of a FreeBSD Compromise (Part 1)
  • Hardening BSD with Security Levels
  • FreeBSD Foundation Update

FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 Available (Official)

It is now official: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 is available for download.

The second of the Release Candidate builds for the 9.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Since this is the first release of a brand new branch I cross-post the announcements on both -current and -stable.
But just so you know most of the developers active in head and stable/9 pay more attention to the -current mailing list. If you notice problems you can report them through the normal Gnats PR system or on the -current mailing list.

The 9.0-RELEASE cycle can be tracked at wiki.freebsd.org/Releng/9.0TODO.

For update details, MD5 checsums and FTP locationts, check out the announcement: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 Available.

Happy testing.