Benchmarks: FreeBSD, Oracle Linux, UFS and ZFS

Some love benchmarks, others hate them, especially when ‘apples’ are compare with ‘pears’, when Linux is benchmarked against FreeBSD.

For what it’s worth there are some new benchmarks on openbenchmarking.org:

When looking at the FreeBSD vs Oracle Linux benchmarks, keep in mind that both operating systems are quite different kernels, FreeBSD 9 is an RC and that it’s easy to tweak some settings in FreeBSD to make it a lot faster.

 

 

FreeBSD 9.0-RC3 available

FreeBSD 9.0-RC3 is now available for download.

It is expected that this will be the last of the the test builds, and final release builds will be begun in about a week’s time.

The third and what should be final Release Candidate build for the 9.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Since this is the beginning of a brand new branch (stable/9).

The 9.0-RELEASE cycle will be tracked on the 9.0 todo page.

Mailinglist announcement and download instructions can be found here: FreeBSD 9.0-RC3 Available

Rolling Your Own Kernel (BSD Magazine 2011-12)

December’s issue of the BSD Magazine is available: Rolling Your Own Kernel.

  • Free Issue to Download! BSD 12/2011
  • Google Code-In and FreeBSD’s Participation
  • Installing PC-BSD on a Mac
  • Keeping Your Configuration Files Shiny as New Using sysmerge(8)
  • Rolling Your Own FreeBSD Kernel
  • OpenBSD 5.0: PHP, Cacti, and Symon
  • Extracting Useful Information From Log Messages
  • Anatomy of a FreeBSD Compromise (Part 1)
  • Hardening BSD with Security Levels
  • FreeBSD Foundation Update

FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 Available (Official)

It is now official: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 is available for download.

The second of the Release Candidate builds for the 9.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available. Since this is the first release of a brand new branch I cross-post the announcements on both -current and -stable.
But just so you know most of the developers active in head and stable/9 pay more attention to the -current mailing list. If you notice problems you can report them through the normal Gnats PR system or on the -current mailing list.

The 9.0-RELEASE cycle can be tracked at wiki.freebsd.org/Releng/9.0TODO.

For update details, MD5 checsums and FTP locationts, check out the announcement: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 Available.

Happy testing.

Heads up: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 seeding

There’s no official announcement yet, but for the fearless and those that can’t wait: FreeBSD 9.0-RC2 is being uploaded to the different, international mirrors.

One of the places where you can grab your copy, is ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/releases/i386/i386/ISO-IMAGES/9.0/

As usual, until there’s formal announcement, the files may have errors and can be removed at any time.

BHyVe – a Native FreeBSD Hypervisor

How to install and help test FreeBSD’s exciting new BHyVe hypervisor

Michael Dexter has published a tutorial on CFT on FreeBSD‘s upcoming type 2 hypervisor known as BHyVe. The article is an easy to follow tutorial showing how to configure, build and boot a hypervisor capable host and guest system. BHyVe currently only supports modern Intel’s x86 virtualization hardware & the project itself is still currently under early development.

FreeBSD is very much lacking virtualization features (not counting jails) and the BHyVe project is excellent news for FreeBSD!

“Neel Natu and Peter Grehan unveiled BHyVe (PDF), the “BSD HyperVisor” (incl. Audio) for FreeBSD at BSDCan 2011 and kindly helped me get it up and running. I invite you to do the same and explore the many possibilities of this up and coming alternative to Linux KVM. Because BHyVe relies primarily on the Virtual Machine Manager vmm.ko kernel module, it should be portable to other BSD’s and even other operating systems. BHyVe guest virtual machines run modified FreeBSD kernels at this time and there are many opportunities to remove this limitation. Be aware that BHyVe is under active development and should be considered experimental.”

Full article and howto: Hands-on BHyVe.

Thanks to Fernando and Krzysztof for the heads up.

Links

Writing FreeBSD kernel modules

Writing a FreeBSD kernel module. Many may think this is a difficult task, but if you know the basics of programming and have some knowledge of and experience with FreeBSD, it may not be as difficult as it sounds.

Jared Barneck has put together an easy to follow guide showing the basics of writing a “hello world” module: How to write a FreeBSD Kernel Module

Follow Jared’s steps and check out some of the online resources he’s linked to, and you’re ready to go.

Happy programming.