Released: Portable C Compiler (pcc 1.0)

Thanks to funding by BSD Fund,  Anders Magnusson has released the first stable release of PCC 1.0.0 (Portable C Compiler) for i386 adn amd64. PCC was developed in order to create an alternative C compiler to GCC, but licensed under BSD.

pcc should be a well-working compiler on i386 and amd64 on a number of OSes, including the BSD’s, most Linuxes and also Microsoft Windows….

The compiler is based on the original Portable C Compiler by S. C. Johnson, written in the late 70′s. About 50% of the frontend code and 80% of the backend code has been rewritten. See the PCC History wiki page for details.

If you’re not familiar with PCC, the following from wikipedia may be of interest (portable c compiler):

The Portable C Compiler is an early compiler for the C programming language written by Stephen C. Johnson of Bell Labs in the mid-1970s—based in part on ideas from earlier work by Alan Snyder in 1973.

One of the first compilers that could easily be adapted to output code for different computer architectures, the compiler had a long life span. It shipped with BSD Unix until the release of 4.4BSD in 1994—when it was replaced by the GNU C Compiler. It was very influential in its day, so much so that at the beginning of the 1980s, the majority of C compilers were based on it.

The keys to the success of pcc were its portability and improved diagnostic capabilities:

  • The compiler was designed so that only a few of its source files were machine-dependent.
  • It was relatively robust to syntax errors and performed more thorough validity checks.

 

Links: ReleasePCC page

BSD Magazine 2011-04: FreeBSD: portability with VMware

A new issue of the free BSD Magazine is available: FreeBSD: Portability with VMware (pdf)

From the table of contents

Interview with Dru Lavigne

Dru Lavigne is a network and systems administrator, IT instructor, author and international speaker. She has over a decade of experience administering and teaching Netware, Microsoft, Cisco, Checkpoint, SCO, Solaris, Linux and BSD systems. She is author of BSD Hacks, The Best of FreeBSD Basics, and The Definitive Guide to PCBSD.

Why You Use FreeBSD Just May Start With A ‘Z’

You may have been using FreeBSD for a long time. You may have just started using it. Regardless of how long you’ve been using it, whether it’s been fifteen years or fifteen days, you have needs, and FreeBSD fulfills some or all of them.

OpenBSD improves upon /etc/rc.d/

The OpenBSD developers did not adopt a change like this until they were sure they had a mechanism that was both simple to implement and simple to use.

DragonFly News

There’s been some dramatic changes for DragonFly in the past month; all positive but having significant effects.

Package Management for the upcoming PC-BSD 9

Among the various improvements planned for PC-BSD 9.0, among the largest of these is the refreshed PBI package management format.

Converting a Physical Partition with FreeBSD to a vmware Image

Portability is something people increasingly value, because it has a number of advantages – you can, for example, carry your desktop (or server) anywhere with you and thus also all your very important personal data that you have created over some time, or perhaps over many years.

Build appliances with QEMU and OpenBSD

OpenBSD is the slimmest desktop OS. It is complete, functional and usable on any computer as long as your expectations are that of an engineer as opposed to a user.

Drupal on FreeBSD part 5

Continuing the series on the Drupal Content Management System, we will look at adding discrete PHP and Javascript code to our pages.

Mutt On OS X part 2

Last time (BSD Magazine 02/2011), we installed Mutt on OS X and read and sent mail from a Gmail account. This month, we’ll get one step closer to replacing Mail.app by learning a way to handle multiple accounts and how to search our Mac’s Address book from within Mutt.

Realtime Weather Data EMWIN on FreeBSD

Have ever run to the TV, turned on a radio, or browsed to a weather site, just to find out what the weather conditions are, or about to become? You can now have data delivered right to server, use in a web site, or sent as notifications to pagers via e-mail.

Benchmarking Different Kind of Storage

In this article we will examine 2 types of storage: an iSCSI and a local hard drive.

Content Management Made Easy The Open Source Way!

We take a look at the open-source Content Management Systems available for your enterprise website.

Download: BSD Magazine 2011-04: FreeBSD: Portability with VMware

Available: FreeNAS 8.0-RC4

iXsystems has announced the availability of FreeNAS 8.0-RC4. Barring major bugs this is likely the last release candidate before 8.0-RELEASE.

Beside mostly bug fixes there is one last bit of new functionality, which is GUI replacement of drives in volumes, and a few small pieces, such as the ability to edit powerd settings in the GUI.

Most notable changes in this RC are:

“Snapshot functionality has been added.  There are features to create periodic snapshot jobs, create one time snapshots, clone snapshots (which can then be exported as shares like any other dataset) and rollback to previous snapshot.

VLAN interfaces are fully supported.  VLANs can be created from the GUI or from the CLI menu on the console.

NFS shares can be set to use the full range of maproot and mapall options.  In addition, tuning is available for the NFS service to boost performance past gigE networking speeds.

Users and groups available to the system from any source (local users, LDAP, AD) are now presented anywhere a user or group is specified, whether it’s volume permissions, samba anonymous user, or NFS maproot.

Several functions in System -> advanced were hooked up, a few were deleted. Powerd now works, toggling between the CLI script and a normal login works, the MOTD updates properly, and the serial console works.

The kernel modules to support several RAID controllers were added, as well as the modules to enable mount_smbfs to work from the CLI.”

I’m looking forward to installing and using FreeNAS 8.0-Release. Hopefully we won’t have to wait too long for that one to come out. iXsystems has done a great job so far.

For more information, please refer to Josh’ release announcement: FreeNAS 8.0 RC-4

Upcoming FreeBSD Events: BSDCan, GSoC 2011

As most of you will be aware, BSDCan is one of the major annual BSD conferences, and Google sponsors development of the 5 big BSD’s each year in the Summer of Code. More info with regards to these events below.

BSDCan 2011

BSD Talk has a 15 minutes interview with Dan Langille, the organiser of BSDCan 2011, wherein they chat about the upcoming BSDCan conference: BSDTalk 203 – BSDCan and PGCon with Dan Langille

The FreeBSD Foundation will be providing a limited number of travel grants to individuals requesting assistance. Please fill out and submit the (PDF) Travel Grant Request Application by April 15, 2011 to apply for this grant.

This program is open to FreeBSD developers of all sorts (kernel hackers, documentation authors, bugbusters, system administrators, etc). In some cases we are also able to fund non-developers, such as active community members and FreeBSD advocates. Read further

Google Summer of Code 2011

Google Announces Summer of Code Accepted Projects
Google has announced the accepted projects list for its 2011 Google Summer of Code (GSOC) Program. Accepted Projects can be viewed on this page. FreeBSD is among them. If you want to take part, check out the FreeBSD GSoC ideas page.

Grazer Linuxtag 2011

FH Joanneum Graz, Graz, Austria  -

The Grazer Linuxtag is a one day event (09 April 2011, FH Joanneum Graz, Graz, Austria) on Linux and free software in general. Besides a FreeBSD booth and the possibility to take the BSDA certification exam there will also be a BSD Bootcamp with live workshops covering different FreeBSD topics. More information can be found here.

 

Finds of the day: Daemon oggcast and howtobsd.com

Whilst serving and checking out a few links today, I came across the following sites that you may be interested in too:

Daemon & Penguin oggcast.

The latest podcast is about GhostBSD 2.0 which was released last week (Released: GhostBSD 2.0):

In episode number 17, I go over a recent install of GhostBSD 2.0 which now has a home on my laptop. It happens to be one of the easiest installs so far. You end up with a fully configured FreeBSD running Gnome as the desktop. The GhostBSD team are doing a great job, so give it a try and you will be up and running in no time (Listen)

II howtobsd.comSimple way to understanding FreeBSD

This site has been around since October 2009 but I only stumbled upon it today. As the name suggests, you can find there many useful commands and howtos, e.g:

  • Create a SVN repository
  • Monitoring FreeBSD servers with Munin
  • Installing Ruby on Rails on FreeBSD
  • freebsd geom mirror howto
  • How to move FreeBSD system from one hdd to another
  • Backup freebsd howto with fsbackup

Available: m0n0wall 1.33

After eleven months of development, version 1.33 of the FreeBSD-based m0n0wall embedded firewall distribution has been released.

Manuel Kasper mentions that m0n0wall 1.33 includes several improvements over previous versions and will probably be the last version based on FreeBSD 6.4.

Some of the changes are:

  • a new image type “generic-pc-serial” has been added; the only difference to generic-pc is that it always uses the serial console
  • added Realtek customized network chip driver to support additional chipsets
  • updated ipfilter to 4.1.33
  • inbound NAT rules can now be added on the LAN interface with the WAN address as a target; this helps with accessing servers on an optional interface from the LAN interface by using m0n0wall’s WAN IP address

Links

Released: GhostBSD 2.0

Last week GhostBSD 2.0 was released

GhostBSD is a free operating system based on FreeBSD that can either be installed or run as Live-CD. Its default graphical environment is GNOME and GhostBSD 2.0 is based on FreeBSD 8.2.

The installer is not a point-and-click GUI but a python script. However, for most people who have used BSD or Linux, the questions are self explanatory.

Some of the changes, additions and features are:

  • support auto mount of USB Devices!
  • new logo
  • bug fixes
  • new live file system
  • improvements to GDM
  • based upon FreeBSD 8.2
  • package installation and management can be done with the new package manager, Bxpkg

Included software packages are:

  • Gnome 2.32
  • Rhythmbox 0.12.8_3
  • Pidgin 2.7.7
  • Firefox 3.6
  • Thunderbird 3.0.11

Prashanth has written a review on Das U-Blog: Review: GhostBSD 2.0

I tried to install GhostBSD 2.0 in VirtualBox but some issue would not allow the installer finish installation.

The GhostBSD Team has also released a new website. Unfortunately, it’s still very bare and contains some bugs and spelling errors. Hopefully this will be dealt with soon.

Let’s see how GhostBSD and PC-BSD 9.0 (Gnome) will square up…