FreeBSD 10-RC5 released

freebsd_logo-100x100Glen Barber has announced, on behalf of the FreeBSD Release Engineering team, the 5th RC build for FreeBSD 10.

The waiting for 10.0 Release will soon be over, as this is (definitely, this time) be the last RC build.

Major changes between -RC4 and -RC5 include:

  • Fix an IPv4 multicast regression.
  • Fixes OpenSSL for CVE-2013-4353, CVE-2013-6449, CVE-2013-6450.
  • Revert a change to the kinfo_file structure to preserve ABI.
  • Fix a race condition which could prevent the file descriptor table from being properly updated.

The release build is expected to start on 15 January, so the release announcement will be soon to follow.

Check the release email for checksums and download locations.

BSDTalk interview with George Neville-Neil on FreeBSD Journal

Podcast LogosWill Backman of BSDTalk (BSDTalk 237) has uploaded a 22 minutes interview with George Neville-Neil (MP3 or OGG) wherein they talk about the upcoming FreeBSD Journal.

Will and George chat about the following – these are just some notes:

There’s already a BSD Magazine, but not a magazine focusing on FreeBSD only

The Editorial Board consists of the following members

  • John Baldwin
  • Daichi Goto
  • Joseph Kong
  • Dru Lavign
  • Michael Lucas
  • Kirk McKusick
  • George Neville-Neil
  • Hiro Sato
  • Robert Watson

Task of the Board is to find interesting content and articles, by talking to those active in the FreeBSD community.

Target market of the Journal is the FreeBSD community (so users know what’s going on) and developers (as they’re not involved in all parts of the FreeBSD operating system).

There will be 6 issues per year and each issue will be around one specific theme:

  • FreeBSD 10 (end of Jan 2014)
  • Networking
  • Virtualisation
  • Development tools
  • New hardware features

The magazine will be distributed through online channels so it can be read on tablets, also offline.

The FreeBSD Journal app  will be available for free trough the Google Play Store, Amazon Kindle Store and Apple iTunes. Though the app is free, a subscription is required to download the magazines, or single issues can be purchased.

A 1 year subscription (6 issues) costs $19.99 or $6.99 per single issue.

The FreeBSD Journal will be different from other mags:

  • Only electronic, no paper issue, just production costs to be paid for
  • No wastage due to spare paper copies
  • Just FreeBSD related and FreeBSD specific topics (ZFS, hardware etc)
  • Writers are often developers who are also able to write well

App and first issue to be released at same time, at the end of Jan 2014.

FreeBSD Foundation has allocated funds to cover the1st year. Subscription in place to re-coup some of the costs, or all. From next year, any profits will be used for the development and promotion of FreeBSD.

On freebsdjournal.com visitors can:

  • Contact editorial board
  • Leave feedback
  • Advertisers can contact board

Electronic issues won’t be available for download on freebsdjournal.com due to difficulties around subscriptions desktop apps. Journal only to be sold through app stores, at least for the the first number of months.

It won’t be possible to print copies of the Journal. Limited print runs may be available at FreeBSD related conferences.

The 1st issue (Jan 2014) will be about FreeBSD 10. Other subjects are:

  • FreeBSD 10 features
  • LLVM/Clang
  • ZFS
  • Beaglebone Black
  • Kernel related article
  • How to run a large data center with FreeBSD (NYI)
  • Columns
  • Events calendar
  • This day in BSD

This looks all very interesting, and I’m looking forward to the first Issue.

From what you have heard in the interview or read above, will you consider buying the FreeBSD Journal subscription?

FreeBSD (based) releases and events – December 2013

This is a quick recap of what happened in the world of FreeBSD in December 2013.

Releases

 

Events and Conferences

 

Magazine and videos

 

Projects

 

Faces, people and new committers

Faces of FreeBSD - 

New committers

  • Ganbold Tsagaankhuu (doc, src)
  • Jonathan Chu (ports)
  • Bryan Drewery (ports, src)

Ports Managers

PC-BSD 10.0-RC3 now available

Kris has announced RC3 version of the upcoming PC-BSD 10.0-RELEASE.

PC-BSD Logo

Notable features and changes from RC2 are:

  • Includes FreeBSD 10.0-RC3 from 12/26/2013
  • Updated KMS / AMD driver support
  • ISO file is a hybrid USB file, and can be “dd”ed to a USB media.
  • New text-based installer
  • New UEFI loader on installation media
  • Able to select between GRUB/BSD loaders during installation
  • New desktops! Gnome 3, Mate (Replaces Gnome2) and Cinnamon
  • And much more

Use the ISO with caution (not on production systems) and let the PC-BSD dev team know of any issues you may come across.

Announcement

FreeBSD Capsicum, MEGACORE, pfSense Store, Faces and more

Freebsd newsIn this post we have a mix of news snippets, links to howtos, projects, resources and software/package updates collated over the last two weeks. Just a round-up of those miscellaneous FreeBSD related links you may find interesting.

 

Jailing FreeBSD 4 on FreeBSD 10
michaelwlucas.com  - 02 Jan 2014

NYCBSDCon 2014  interview with Brian Callahan and Ike Levy
BSD Talk Interview with Brian Callahan and Ike Levy about the upcoming NYCBSDCon.
BSD Talk – 21 December 2013

FreeBSD Foundation Announces Capsicum Integration Project Completion
The Google Open Source Programs Office and the FreeBSD Foundation jointly sponsored Pawe? Jakub Dawidek for this project.
FreeBSD Foundation Blog – 17 December 2013

Faces of FreeBSD
Shteryana ShopovaIsabell Long | Brooks Davis | Kevin Martin |
FreeBSD Foundation Blog

Shop at the pfSense store
Now open

MEGACORE: iXsystems’ monster
ixsystems.com – 27 December 2013

Massively upgraded FreeBSD 10 to be released next week
Infoworld – 03 January 2014

McKusick denies FreeBSD lagging on security
itwire.com – 06 January 2014

ArchBSD new ISO available
archbsd.net – 25 December 2013

BSD Now Episode 18: Eclipsing Binaries (video)

The BSD Now TV Team has uploaded a new episode, Eclipsing Binaries – Episode 18, featuring an interview with Baptiste Daroussin. In this episode you will find the following topics being discussed:

  • Faces of FreeBSD continues
  • OpenPF?
  • Year of BSD on the server
  • Getting to know your portmgr
  • Interview with Baptiste Daroussin
  • Binary upgrades in OpenBSD
  • pfSense december hang out
  • BSDMag December issue is out
  • OpenBSD gets tmpfs
  • PCBSD weekly digests

rootbsd_banner1This post is sponsored by our partner RootBSD, an expert in BSD style web hosting : stable, secure, flexible and friendly.

FreeBSD 10.0-RC4 available

Glen Barber has announced the fourth, and possibly last, RC of the upcoming FreeBSD 10:

“The fourth RC build of the 10.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures. This is expected to be the final RC build of the 10.0-RELEASE cycle.

Changes between -RC4 and -RC4 include:

  • tighten default restrictions for ntpd(8) server;
  • fix kernel crash discovered with recent Java port update.”

The final release of FreeBSD 10 is expected within two weeks, on 14 January 2014.

BSD Magazine (December 2013) – CARP on FreeBSD

BSD_12_2013December’s issue of the BSD Magazine is now available: CARP on FreeBSD (free PDF download).

You’ll find the following subjects inside:

Configuring a Highly Available Service on FreeBSD – part 2: CARP and devd

In the first part of this series, we learned how to make high availability (HA) storage on FreeBSD using HAST. We learned how to control HAST and how to recover from failures. However, all those actions were still manual actions. In this second part of the series, Jeroen will teach how two basic building blocks, CARP and devd, work and how we can use them in the final part of our series to automate the failover of our NFS server.

FreeBSD Programming Primer – Part 11

In the penultimate part of our series on programming, Rob will look at using the Netbeans Integrated Development Environment to debug and edit our CMS.

Unix Basics – for Security Professionals

Unix is the widely known multi-user and multitasking operating system that exists in many variants (e.g. Solaris, Linux, UX, AIX …etc), and for serves mission critical server environments around the world. Ramkumar provides the basics of Unix Operating systems while discussing how UNIX addresses the above security challenges.

Introduction to Unix Kernel

It is usually a source of wonderment to PC users that the whole of the Unix operating system is in one executable. Instead of a hodge-podge of DLL’s, drivers, and various occasionally-cooperating executables, everything is done by the Unix kernel. When Unix was first introduced, the operating system was described as having a ‘shell’, or user interface, which surrounded a ‘kernel’ which interpreted the commands passed to it from the shell.

OpenBSD 5.4 as a Transparent HTTP/HTTPS Proxy

Wesley in his article will teach you how to configure Relayd for URL Blocking with https inspection and how to use and understand Packet Filter.

GhostBSD: A User-friendly, Lightweight BSD Alternative

GhostBSD is an open source desktop operating system based on FreeBSD which aims for a secure, user-friendly experience out of the box. GhostBSD comes with most common software choices already configured, giving the user a solid BSD installation out of the box. Adrian will tell you why he chose FreeBSD OS.

How Secure Can Secure Shell (SSH) Be?

To begin, let’s concentrate on the One Time Password (OTP). We are going to achieve our already secure SSH in conjunction with OTP for remote system connections. At first, in algorithmic meaning, OTP is a character string which should never repeat. Arkadiusz, in his article, demonstrates configurations as well as tricks that make using the protocol more secure.

Column by Rob Somerville

OPINION: With the UK government in collusion with the major search engines to censor 100,000 search terms to prevent child abuse, is the UK joining the ranks of the technological fascists?

Read and download: CARP on FreeBSD