Kylin OS – more details and download links

My last post on Kylin, China’s secure, FreeBSD based operating system, has raised quite a bit of interest and people have been asking for download links.

I’ve done some more research into Kylin, and came across the main Kylin website: kylin-os.com (Chinese). The government seems to have set up a company, Kyrin,  to research, develop, promote, educate and deploy Kylin in government departments and commercial enterprices, e.g.

  • China Construction Bank
  • North China Electric Power
  • Xiangcai Securities
  • Shanghai Unicom

Kirin also develops load balancing servers, NAS storage systems,  secure network storage (SecStor) and a Linux based Kylin version.

It’s interesting to note that NeoKylin, or any replacement for Kylin, is developed by China Standard Software and the National University of Defense Technology, and not by Kirin.

What is the reasoning (for the government) to begin developing a new product? Was Kylin with its proprietary security layer not secure enough? Or, is NeoKylin just another domestic Chinese product built with government sponsorship and funding like redflag-linux?

For the record, Kylin 2.1 is Freebsd 5.3 + linux_base-fc4. If you’re familiar with Chinese, you may download Kylin 2.1 from freebsdcentral.com:

I’ve not been able to get my fingers on Kylin 3.0 (yet).

More on Kylin OS (use Google Translate):

Considering FreeBSD Jails

Jon Buys has a blog post on ostatic.com about FreeBSD Jails. He goes into the different approaches of Linux and FreeBSD and how this becomes clear in virtualistion. He also goes into operating virtualisation vs application virtualisation.

In a traditional virtual machine, built the way VMware, Xen, and VirtualBox do VMs, the virtualization application runs an entire operating system as an independent entity. This requires the application to virtualize the hardware, producing CPU, RAM, and storage in software. The application then boots a new kernel in the virtualized environment, and runs specialized drivers, like VMware tools, inside of the newly booted operating system to allow communication between the two systems.

FreeBSD jails are very different. The jail does not boot its own kernel, and does not run a full version of the operating system. A jail is comprised of a filesystem, a hostname, an IP address, and an application. Jails can be seen as the logical successor to the older chroot environment, which restricted an applications access to the filesystem by providing the application it’s own root. Jails expand on this concept by further separating the host operating system and the application they are running. The difference between virtual machines and jails can be summed up by saying that virtual machines are for operating systems, jails are for applications.

Jon really likes Jails and concludes his post with:

FreeBSD jails allow an administrator to use a single operating system on a single physical machine, and then partition that machine into logical application entities that are no more than an IP address, a name, and the files absolutely necessary to run the application. I’ve been running the FreeBSD jails in a development environment for a while, and I’ve been very happy with them so far. You trade off some of the high-availability aspects that comes with the higher-priced VMware licenses, but what you get is a simple, reliable system.

Read the whole post: Considering FreeBSD Jails

NeoKylin. China’s new domestic FreeBSD based desktop O/S

Two respected Chinese software companies of two operating systems used in China are said to be joining forces (20/12/2010) to create a domestic operating system called NeoKylin.

China Standard Software and the National University of Defense Technology have signed a strategic partnership to launch an operating system brand known as “NeoKylin” that will be used for national defense and all sectors of the country’s economy.

China Standard Software said via a spokesman that the agreement was meant to pave the way for a stronger domestic operating system environment for China. No information has been offered on a timetable for any product launches under the new brand.

China Standard is the maker of the NeoShine Linux desktop series, which includes operating systems built to run in government organisations, business and personal computers.

Academics at the National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), on the other hand, are responsible for the Kylin operating system, a secure and FreeBSD based alternative to foreign software such as Microsoft Windows.

The Chinese government seems to be in favour of developing domestic operating systems and being less dependent on the West, i.e Microsoft Windows, out of security considerations (CIA/FBI backdoors??) and as a way to support the local economy. They are determined to kick Windows out of government departments and to make NeoKylin China’s new preferred O/S.

It is not clear whether Kylin will be used as server O/S and NeoKylin as desktop system, or whether NeoKylin will be deployed for both server and desktop use. Neither is it yet known when NeoKylin OS will be released in China.

Do you know have any information on NeoKylin? It would be great if you could share them with us all.

(via pcw)

Kylin, a Chinese FreeBSD based, secure O/S

The Kylin operating system is a server operating system focusing on high performance, availability and security. Its initial developement was  funded by a Chinese government-sponsored Research and Development (R&D) program in 2002. The first public version of Kylin was released in 2007.

Kylin is based on FreeBSD 5.3 with some proprietary security extensions to add an extra level of security to that operating system. Kylin, named after qili, a mythical beast, has been organised in a hierarchy model, including the basic kernel layer which is responsible for initializing the hardware and providing basic memory management and task management, the system service layer which is based on FreeBSD providing UFS2 and BSD network protocols, and the desktop environment which is similar to Windows. It has been designed to comply with the UNIX standards and is compatible with Linux binaries.

Operating systems currently used in China are mainly developed overseas, and it seems to become clearer that it is a national strategy to develop China-owned computer software to replace proprietary software produced in the West. Kylin is approved for use by the People’s Liberation Army and has apparently been deployed in Chinese military, national defence and sensitive government organisations since 2007. Kylin is also being used in finance, governance and education.

(sources used: EuroBSDCon 2005 lecture and Wikipedia)

Happy 2011

Dear RSS Subscribers, #gvanessen Twitter followers and Facebook subscribers,

I hope you all will have a happy and prosperous 2011. May we see FreeBSD, and all systems based on it, further improve and expand market share in 2011.

If you come across any interesting bits of FreeBSD related news this year, let me know, or if you prefer and want to contribute regularly, let’s discuss and I can set you up as co-editor.

Feel free to contact me with suggestions how this website can be improved, leave comments on posts, or spread the word about freebsdnews.net.

Regards

Gerard

FreeBSD quick news and links (week 52)

Below some links to news articles and blog posts relating to FreeBSD, it’s development, howto’s etc, and other interesting bits and bops connected with the FreeBSD operating system.

1. Automatic Install with FreeBSD 64-bit on RootBSD.

All new RootBSD orders are now able to select FreeBSD 8.1-RELEASE 64-bit as an option in the order form. Although manual install is still an option, this selection will prompt our new automated installer for FreeBSD 64-bit that allows your VPS to be set up in a matter of minutes like our current 32-bit offering once your order is approved. FreeBSD 32-bit is still recommended for most users.

2. FreeBSD Foundation fund raising drive (2010)

This is a last plea from the FreeBSD Foundaion for 2010 donations. Can you help?

3. FreeBSD on Amazon EC2

FreeBSD 9.0 headed to the cloud as 8.2 nears release (internetnews.com). Related to this is Collin’s updated FreeBSD on Amazon’s EC2 FAQ

4. GhostBSD – Preview for the next release.

New Logo, new theme for GhostBSD 2.0 and plans to make it faster.

5. Running Pinta on FreeBSD (rhyous.com - howto).

Pinta is a drawing/editing program modeled after Paint.NET. It’s goal is to provide a simplified alternative to GIMP for casual users. It is currently early in development.

6. ZFS in Debian

ZFS is coming to Debian! Of course, it will be arriving there via the FreeBSD kernel. ZFS v28 s imminent in FreeBSD. Testers need to check out the new patch (via Ivan Voras’ blog).

7. Oracle highligts Solaris UNIX Plans

The OS will feature next-generation networking capabilities for scalability and performance, said John Fowler, Oracle executive vice president of systems, at a company event in Santa Clara, Calif. “It’s a complete reworking of [the] enterprise OS,” he said. Oracle took over Solaris when the company acquired Sun Microsystems early this year.

Full post:  Oracle highlights Solaris UNIX plans (computerworld.com)

Talking about UNIX, Novell has moved to quell growing concerns that it has sold Linux out to Microsoft as part of its Attachmate deal: Novell keeps Unix copyrights from Microsoft

8. FreeBSD: High Performance Packet Capture
Summary and background information: FreeBSD: High Performance Packet Capture

9. Marketing Assistant for Open Source Hardware Manufacturer

Ever wanted to work for a FreeBSD focused company? If ‘Marketing’ is your thing and you’re at ‘assistant level’, have a look at this vacancy with iXsystems: Marketing Assistant for Open Source Hardware Manufacturer

iXsystems is looking for a Marketing Assistant with developed writing skills and the ability to do some digital graphic work as well. The ideal candidate is both creative and hardworking with the ability to develop innovative ideas for ads and print related to open source servers and software. Applicants will need to be able to work five days a week from 10 am – 6pm. Some flex time is permitted, but minimum amount of time required in the office is 3 full days per week.

10. Trying PC-BSD 8.2-BETA2 (taosecurity). Richard Bejtlich took PC-BSD 8.2-BETA2 for a spin. His feedback here.

11. KDE Software Compilation 4.4.5 in ports

Announced: FreeBSD 8.2-RC1 and 7.4-RC1

Ken Smith has announced the availability of the first release candidates for FreeBSD 8.2 and 7.4

The first Release Candidate for the FreeBSD 7.4/8.2 release cycle is now available. For 7.4-RC1 the amd64, i386, pc98, and sparc64 architectures are available, for 8.2-RC1 those architectures plus ia64 and powerpc are available.

Full Announcement: FreeBSD 7.4/8.2-RC1 Available